Sep 24, 2021  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Legend for Courses

HC/HN: Honors Course  IN/IH: Integrated lecture/lab  LB: Lab  LC: Clinical Lab  LS: Skills Lab  WK: Co-op Work
SUN#: is a prefix and number assigned to certain courses that represent course equivalency at all Arizona community colleges and the three public universities. Learn more at www.aztransfer.com/sun.

 

Fire Science

  
  •  

    FSC 101 - Principles of Emergency Services

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to fire protection and emergency services. Includes career opportunities in fire protection and related fields, culture and history of emergency services, fire loss analysis, organization and function of public and private fire protection services, and fire departments as part of local government. Also includes laws and regulations affecting the fire service, fire service nomenclature, specific fire protection functions, basic fire chemistry and physics, introduction to fire protection systems, introduction to fire strategy and tactics, and life safety initiatives.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define the history and culture of the fire service, the role of support organizations, and the scope, purpose, and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
    2. Identify fire protection and emergency-service careers in both the public and private sector and compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.
    3. Identify the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment, and apparatus and organizations that provide emergency response services.
    4. Recognize the components of career preparation, goal setting, wellness and fitness, and differentiate between fire service training and education.
    5. Explain the components of fire prevention and types of fire protection systems.
    6. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical chain reaction, the major phases of fire, and examine the main factors that influence fire spread and fire behavior.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify fire protection and emergency-service careers in both the public and private sector.
    2. Differentiate between fire service training and education, and the value of higher education to the professionalization of the fire service.
    3. Illustrate and explain the history and culture of the fire service.
    4. Identify and explain the components of fire prevention including code enforcement, public information, and public and private fire protection systems.
    5. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical chain reaction, the major phases of fire, and examine the main factors that influence fire spread and fire behavior.
    6. Identify and compare different types of building design and construction methods.
    7. Define the various fire detection and suppression systems.
    8. Define the role of national, state, and local support organizations in fire and emergency services.
    9. Describe the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment, and apparatus.
    10. List and describe the major organizations that provide emergency response service and illustrate how they interrelate.
    11. Describe the importance of wellness and fitness as it relates to emergency services.
    12. Compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.
    13. Discuss and describe the scope, purpose, and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
    14. Recognize the components of career preparation and goal setting.

    Outline:
    1. Careers in the Fire Protection/Emergency Services
      1. Opportunities/private, industrial, local, municipal, state, and federal
      2. Pay, hours of duty, benefits, promotion, and retirement qualifications
      3. Work ethics and human relations education training 
        1. Certificates
        2. Degrees
        3. Selection process
    2. History
      1. Evolution of the fire protection
      2. The U.S. fire problem: life and property
    3. Fire Prevention and Public Fire Education
      1. Fire investigation
      2. Code enforcement
      3. Public education
    4. Scientific Terminology
      1. Fire behavior
      2. Flammability and characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases
    5. Building Design and Construction
    6. Fire Detection and Suppression Systems
    7. The Role of Public and Private Support Organizations
      1. Local
      2. State
      3. Federal and national
      4. International
    8. Fire and Emergency Services Equipment and Facilities
    9. Management
      1. Emergency operations
      2. Organizational structure of fire and emergency services


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    FSC 110 - Rope I

    0.75 Credits, 1.25 Contact Hours
    .50 lecture periods .75 lab periods

    Introduction to basic rope rescue: safety, equipment, rope craft, anchors, mechanical advantage, belay systems, medical considerations, identifying terrain types, low angle evacuations, steep angle evacuations and steep angle rappel. Includes performance in rope craft, anchor construction, mechanical advantage construction, belay technique, patient packaging, low angle evacuations, and steep angle rappelling.

    Information: This class meets State of Arizona Fire Marshal requirements: NFPA 1983, NFPA 1500 special operations, NFPA 1670.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify appropriate rescue rope, accessory cord, and webbing and list the breaking strength for each. Properly don a recue harness.
    2. Identify rescue hardware, list use and breaking strength for each. Construct single point and multi point anchor systems using rope and webbing.
    3. Identify components of a simple mechanical advantage system and list the rules that apply to     mechanical advantage. Construct simple 2:1, 3:1, and 5:1 mechanical advantage systems.
    4. Package a patient in a stokes litter basket. Act as a litter bearer in flat and low angle evacuations.
    5. Rappel on steep angle terrain using both a rescue 8 and brake rack friction device. Properly belay a general class load.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify appropriate rescue rope, accessory chord and webbing and list the break strength for each.
    2. Identify rescue hardware and list use and break strength for each.
    3. Construct single point and multi point anchors using rope and webbing.
    4. Identify components of a simple mechanical advantage (ma) and list the rules that apply to ma.
    5. Construct a simple 2:1, 3:1, and 5:1 ma.
    6. Package a patient in a stokes litter.
    7. Act as a litter bearer in flat and low angle evacuations.
    8. Properly don a rescue harness.
    9. Properly belay a class 1 load.
    10. Rappel on steep angle terrain using both rescue 8 and brake rack decent device.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Rope Rescue
      1. Self-establish credibility
      2. Student-establish experience and history
      3. State expectations of the class
    2. Philosophy
      1. History of rope rescue
      2. Rescuer safety
    3. Equipment
      1. Software
        1.  Rope types
          1. Laid
          2. Braided
          3. Kern-mantle
        2. Rope construction
          1. Laid
          2. Braided
          3. Kerm-mantle
        3. NFPA 1983 life safety rope
          1. NFPA loads
            1. Class I (300 lb.)
            2. Class II (600 lb.)
          2. Safety margin
            1. Rope 15:1
            2. System (double rope) 10:1
        4. Rope care
          1. What harms rope (friction demo)
          2. Inspection
          3. Records
          4. Cleaning
        5. Webbing
      2. Hardware
        1. Carabineers
          1. Description
          2. Normal loading
          3. Side loading
          4. Types
          5. Care
        2. Pulleys
          1. Description
          2. Types
          3. Care
          4. D-D ratio 4:1
        3. Edge protection
          1. Roller
          2. Pad
        4. Anchor Plate
        5. Tri-link
        6. Decent control devices
          1. Brake rack
          2. Rescue 8
          3. Any other
      3. Personal Equipment
        1. Harnesses
          1. NFPA class I, II, III (demo donning and proper fit)
          2. Improvised
          3. Specialty
        2. Helmets
        3. Gloves
        4. Footwear
        5. Clothing
        6. Accessories
          1. Lights
          2. Water bottle
          3. Eye protection
          4. Cutting tool
    4. Knots, Bends, and Hitches
      1. Demonstration
      2. Performance
    5. Anchors
      1. Concepts
      2. Single point
      3. Multi-point
      4. Vector forces
      5. Distributing
      6. Sharing
      7. Picket systems (optional)
    6. Mechanical Advantages (ma)
      1. Concepts
      2. Rules
      3. Demonstration and participation
      4. 2:1 3:1 5:1 simple
      5. Integral systems
      6. Ganged systems
    7. Belay Concepts
      1. Personal
      2. System
    8. Skill Stations
      1. Anchors and class I belay demo
      2. Mechanic advantage
    9. Patient Packaging
      1. Guidelines
      2. Performance
    10. Litter Caries
      1. Positions
      2. Carey straps
      3. Litter wheel (optional)
      4. Route finding
      5. Crew rotation
      6. Caterpillar pass
      7. Belay lines
    11. Low Angle Scenarios
      1. Route finding
      2. Patient packaging
      3. Team rotation
    12. Steep Angle Evacuations (Rappel on BB rack and Fig. 8 tie off)
      1. Technical evacuation system components
        1. System anchors (Optional: components and commands)            
        2. Working line
          1. Lowering
          2. Raising
        3. Belay line
          1. Proper set up and operation of TPB
          2. Load releasing hitch
          3. System prusiks
          4. Z turn
      2. Litter rigging
      3. Litter bearer tie
    13. Commands, Checklist and Equipment
      1. System operation commands
      2. Complete skill checklist
      3. Critique and inventory equipment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 120 - Fire Behavior and Combustion

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the theories and fundamentals of fire behavior and combustion. Includes physical and chemical properties of fire, materials and their relationship to fire as fuel, and the use of water and other fire suppression agents and strategies.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define the physical properties and states of matter and describe the impact the combustion process may have on each.
    2. Given various types of fuels, discuss the impacts of the combustion process on the material and hazards firefighters may encounter during suppression activities.
    3. Explain the physical characteristics of fire and how they impact the tactics and strategy of firefighting.
    4. Describe the process of burning and the effects of water and other suppression agents that have on fire, as well as the techniques and strategies of extinguishment.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify the fundamental theories of fire behavior and combustion.
    2. Define units of measurement.
    3. Identify physical properties of the physical states of matter.
    4. Categorize the components of fire.
    5. Define the different types of heat, production, and measurement.
    6. Discuss various materials and their relationship to fires as fuel.
    7. Identify common flammable liquids and general properties of gases.
    8. Define and use basic terms and concepts associated with the chemistry and dynamics of fire.
    9. Discuss the characteristics of flame and combustion.
    10. Differentiate the various types of extinguishing agents.
    11. Classify and compare hazards by type.
    12. Explain the physical and chemical properties of fire.
    13. Describe and apply the process of burning.
    14. Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of water as a fire suppression agent.
    15. Articulate other suppression agents and strategies.
    16. Compare other methods and techniques of fire extinguishment.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction
      1. Matter and energy
      2. The atom and its parts
      3. Chemical symbols
      4. Molecules
      5. Energy and work
      6. Forms of energy
      7. Transformation of energy
      8. Laws of energy
    2. Units of Measurements
      1. International Systems (SI) of measurement
      2. English units of measurement
    3. Chemical Reactions
      1. Physical states of matter
      2. Compounds and mixtures
      3. Solutions and solvents
      4. Process of reactions
    4. Fire and the Physical World
      1. Characteristics of fire
      2. Characteristics of solids
      3. Characteristics of liquids
      4. Characteristics of gases
    5. Heat and its Effects
      1. Production and measurement of heat
      2. Different kinds of heat
    6. Properties of Solids Materials
      1. Common combustible solids
      2. Plastic and polymers
      3. Combustible metals
      4. Combustible dust
    7. Common Flammable Liquids and Gases
      1. General properties of gases
      2. The gas laws
      3. Classification of gases
      4. Compresses gasses
    8. Fire Behavior
      1. Stages of fire
      2. Fire phenomena
        1. Flashover
        2. Backdraft
        3. Rollover
        4. Flameover
      3. Fire plumes
    9. Fire Extinguishment
      1. Combustion process
      2. Characteristics of flame
      3. Fire extinguishment
    10. Extinguishing Agents
      1. Water
      2. Foams and wetting agents
      3. Inert gas extinguishing agents
      4. Halogenated extinguishing agents
      5. Dry chemical extinguishing agents
      6. Dry powder extinguishing agents
    11. Hazards by Classification Types
      1. Explosives
      2. Compressed and liquefied gases
      3. Flammable and combustible liquids
      4. Flammable solids
      5. Oxidizing agents
      6. Poisons
      7. Radioactive substances
      8. Corrosives


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    FSC 123 - Building Construction Related to the Fire Service

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to components of building construction as related to firefighter and life safety. Includes elements of construction and structure design shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, firefighting strategy and tactics, and analyze the hazards, tactical considerations, and the role of Geographic Information System as associated with the various types of building construction.
    2. Identify indicators of collapse in various building construction methods, and identify the indicators of potential structural failure as they relate to firefighter safety.
    3. Discuss theoretical concepts of how fire impacts major types of building construction, and differentiate between fire resistance, flame spread, and describe the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each.
    4. Identify the function of each principle structural component in typical building design, and explain the different loads and stresses that are placed on a building and their interrelationships.
    5. Classify occupancy designations of the building code, and classify major types of building construction in accordance with a local and model building code.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, firefighting strategy and tactics.
    2. Classify major types of building construction in accordance with a local and model building code.
    3. Understand theoretical concepts of how fire impacts major types of building construction.
    4. Analyze the hazards and tactical considerations associated with the various types of building construction.
    5. Explain the different loads and stresses that are placed on a building and their interrelationships.
    6. Identify the function of each principle structural component in typical building design.
    7. Differentiate between fire resistance, flame spread, and describe the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each.
    8. Identify various types of fire stopping and how each best functions.
    9. Describe how ordinary construction reacts to fire and identify indicators of collapse in wood frame structures.
    10. Describe how steel and concrete can be used to increase or decrease a structure’s resistance to stress and fire.
    11. Identify the indicators of potential structural failure as they relate to firefighter safety.
    12. Identify potential hazards to fire fighter safety and indicators of collapse in various building construction methods.
    13. Classify occupancy designations of the building code.
    14. Identify the role of Geographic Information System (GIS) as it relates to building construction.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction
      1. History of building construction
      2. Governmental functions, building and fire codes
        1. Codes and code administration
          1. Building codes
          2. Fire codes
          3. American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
          4. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
          5. Underwriters Laboratories Incorporated (UL)
          6. Testing and how to read
      3. Fire risks and fire protection
      4. Fire loss management and life safety
      5. Pre-fire planning and fire suppression strategies
    2. Principles of Construction
      1. Terminology and definitions
      2. Building and occupancy classifications
      3. Characteristics of building materials
      4. Types and characteristics of fire loads
      5. Effects of energy conservation
    3. Building Construction
      1. Structural members
        1. Definitions, descriptions, and carrying capacities
        2. Effects of loads
      2. Structural design and construction methods
        1. Structural failure and firefighter safety
      3. System failures
    4. Principles of Fire Resistance
      1. Standards of construction
      2. Fire intensity and duration
      3. Theory versus reality
    5. Fire Behavior versus Building Construction
      1. Flame spread
      2. Smoke and fire containment
        1. Construction and suppression systems
        2. HVAC systems
        3. Rack storage
        4. Combustible
    6. Major Construction Types
      1. Wood Construction
        1. Definition and elements of construction
        2. Types of construction
        3. Fire stopping and fire retardants
        4. Modifications/code compliance
      2. Ordinary Construction
        1. Definitions and elements of construction
        2. Structural stability and fire barriers
        3. Modifications/code compliance
      3. Steel Construction
        1. Definitions and elements of construction
        2. Structural stability, fire resistance, and fire protection of elements
        3. Modifications/code compliance
      4. Concrete Construction
        1. Definitions and elements of construction
        2. Structural stability, fire resistance, and fire protection of elements
        3. Modifications/code compliance
      5. High Rise Construction
        1. Early versus modern construction
        2. Vertical and horizontal extension of fire and smoke
        3. Fire protection and suppression
        4. Elevators
        5. Atriums and lobbies
        6. Modifications/code compliance
    7. Structural Failure
      1. Collapse
      2. Ventilation
      3. Non-combustible
    8. Safety
      1. Firefighter
        1. Identification of problems
          1. Hazards to firefighters
          2. Building design
          3. Specialized structures
          4. Fire resistance in construction
          5. Hazards to occupants
          6. How construction affects fire operations
      2. Occupant
    9. Geographic Information System (GIS)


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 124 - Fire Prevention

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to fundamental concepts relating to the field of fire prevention. Includes history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use and application of codes and standards, plans review, fire inspections, fire and life safety education, and fire investigation.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the history and philosophy of fire prevention, the national fire problem, the role and function of fire prevention, fire prevention organizations and associations, and the fire prevention bureau.
    2. Identify laws, codes, ordinance and regulations as they relate to fire prevention and the authorities having jurisdiction; and understand how code enforcement impacts life and property loss.
    3. Describe fire investigation, inspection, and life safety education practice and procedures; and identify the tools and equipment used.
    4. Identify and describe the standards for professional qualification for fire marshal, plans examiner, fire inspector, fire and life safety educator, and fire investigator and list opportunities in professional development for fire prevention personnel.
    5. Identify the types of hazards, basic engineering methods to control fire, and explain the difference between active and passive fire protection.
    6. Identify and understand the purpose of conducting fire investigations, and the standards associate with fire investigation, the importance of fire investigation in a fire prevention program, the importance of gathering data during fire investigations, and importance for investigators to work with law enforcement agencies.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe the history and philosophy of fire prevention.
    2. Understand code enforcement as it impacts life and property loss.
    3. Describe inspection practices and procedures.
    4. Define the national fire problem and the role of fire prevention.
    5. Identify and describe fire prevention organizations and associations.
    6. Identify laws, codes, ordinances, and regulations as they relate to fire prevention and the authorities having jurisdiction.
    7. Define the functions of a fire prevention bureau.
    8. Identify the tools and equipment used in fire investigation and life safety education.
    9. Identify and describe the standards for professional certifications for fire marshal, plans examiner, fire inspector, fire and life safety educator, and fire investigator.
    10. List opportunities in professional development for fire prevention personnel.
    11. Describe the principles of conducting a basic fire prevention inspection and describe the components of a fire prevention record, and reporting system.
    12. Identify the major and common fire hazards.
    13. State the types of building construction.
    14. Review the various occupancy classifications.
    15. Locate site access and means of egress.
    16. Illustrate the components and usage of the various types of fire extinguishment, protection, and alarm systems.
    17. Restate the procedures used in plan review process.
    18. Define code requirements for flammable liquids and other hazardous materials

    Outline:
    1. National Fire Problem and Role of Fire Prevention 
      1. Definition
      2. Historical overview
      3. Data analysis/Geographic Information System (GIS)
      4. Current trends of Fire Prevention
    2. Fire Prevention Organizations and Associations 
      1. Public: federal, state and local
      2. Private: international, national and regional
    3. Laws, Rules, Regulations and Codes
      1. Definitions
      2. Applicability
      3. Interrelationship
      4. Limitations
    4. Fire Prevention Bureau Functions
      1. Data collection and analysis
      2. Plans review
      3. Fire inspections  
      4. Fire and life safety education
      5. Fire investigations
    5. Tools and Equipment
      1. Data collection and analysis
      2. Plans review
      3. Fire inspections  
      4. Fire and life safety education
      5. Fire investigations
    6. Roles and Responsibilities of Fire Prevention Personnel
      1. Data collection and analysis
      2. Code development and interpretation
      3. Training and education
      4. Enforcement
      5. Management
      6. Professional Certification
        1. Categories and levels
        2. Local
        3. State
        4. National
    7. Professional Development
      1. National fire prevention development model
      2. Training and education
      3. Certification systems
    8. Inspection Procedures and Reports
      1. Conducting inspections
      2. Preparing written records
        1. Inspection reports
        2. Correspondence
        3. Handling complaints
        4. Records maintenance
    9. Fire Hazard Recognition
      1. Principles of electricity
      2. Combustible materials storage
      3. Hot work
      4. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems
      5. Special processes
      6. Special subjects
    10. Building Construction
      1. Construction classification
      2. Fire resistive construction and separations
    11. Occupancy Classifications
      1. Group identification
      2. Hazards unique to each
    12. Site Access and Means of Egress (Exits)
      1. Access requirements
      2. Hydrant placement
    13. Water-Based Fire Protection and Water Supply Systems
      1. Automatic sprinkler systems
      2. Standpipe and hose systems
      3. Fire pumps
      4. Water supply systems and water supply analysis
      5. Equipment
        1. Portable fire extinguishers
        2. Special agent fire extinguishing systems
        3. Fire detection and alarm systems
    14. Plans Review
      1. Reading construction drawings
      2. Architectural drawings
    15. Hazardous Materials and Flammable and Combustible Liquids
      1. Hazardous materials identification
      2. Flammable and combustible liquid storage use and dispensing requirements
      3. Storage, handling, and use of other hazardous materials
        1. Explosives
        2. Compressed and liquefied gases
        3. Flammable solids
        4. Toxic and highly toxic materials
        5. Oxidizers and organic peroxides
        6. Radioactive materials
        7. Corrosive materials
        8. Other regulated materials


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 125 - Hydraulics and Water Supply

    2.5 Credits, 3.5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 1.5 lab periods

    Introduction to hydraulics and water supply in fire service. Includes theoretical foundations and principles of water use in fire protection, water distribution systems, and survey of hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe water hydraulics and water hydraulic principles and discuss water as an extinguishing agent.
    2. Describe the function of special fire suppression systems and apply the application of mathematics and physics to the movement of water in fire suppression activities.
    3. List and describe the various sprinkler and standpipes water distributions systems.  
    4. List and describe the various types of water distribution systems and identify the design principles of fire service pumping apparatus.
    5. Discuss the principles and use of portable tanks and drafting during water tanker/tender operations.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe water hydraulics as it relates to fire protection and apply water hydraulic principles.
    2. Discuss water as an extinguishing agent.
    3. Apply the application of mathematics and physics to the movement of water in fire suppression activities.
    4. Demonstrate, through problem solving, a thorough understanding of the principles of forces that affect water, both at rest and in motion.
    5. List and describe the various types of water distribution systems.
    6. Identify the design principles of fire service pumping apparatus.
    7. Discuss the various types of fire pumps.
    8. Explain fire streams, calculate fire flow requirements and analyze community fire flow demand criteria.
    9. Discuss the proper procedures for the use of portable tanks and drafting during water tanker/tender operations.
    10. Describe the function of special fire suppression systems.

    Outline:
    1. Water as an Extinguishing Agent
      1. Physical properties
      2. Pressure and force
      3. Terms and definitions
    2. Math Review
      1. Fractions
      2. Ratios, proportions, and percentages
      3. Power and roots
    3. Water at Rest
      1. Basic principles of hydrostatics
        1. Pressure and force
        2. Six principles of fluid pressure
        3. Pressure as a function of height and density
        4. Atmospheric pressure
      2. Measuring devices for static pressure
      3. Tank and container capacity
        1. Volume
        2. Weight
    4. Water in Motion
      1. Basic principles of hydrokinetics
      2. Measuring devices for measuring flow
      3. Relationship of discharge velocity, orifice size, and flow
    5. Water Distribution Systems
      1. Water sources
      2. Public water distribution systems
      3. Private water distribution systems
      4. Capacity and distribution
      5. Friction loss in piping systems
      6. Fire hydrants and flow testing
      7. Hydraulics and testing
      8. Emergency provisions
    6. Fire Pumps
      1. Pump theory
      2. Pump classifications
      3. Priming systems
      4. Pump capacity
      5. Pump gauges and control devices
      6. Testing fire pumps
    7. Fire Streams
      1. Calculating fire flow requirements
      2. Effective horizontal and vertical reach
      3. Appliances for nozzles
      4. Performance of smooth-bore and combination nozzles
      5. Hand-held lines
      6. Master streams
      7. Nozzle pressures and reaction
      8. Water hammer and cavitation.
      9. Solid streams
      10. Fog streams reach and penetration
    8. Friction Loss
      1. Factors affecting friction loss
      2. Maximum efficient flow in fire hose
      3. Calculating friction loss in fire hose
      4. Friction loss in appliances
      5. Reducing friction loss
    9. Engine Pressures
      1. Factors affecting engine pressure
      2. Multiple lines
      3. Elevated and appliance application
    10. Standpipe  and Sprinkler Systems
      1. Standpipe systems
        1. Classifications
        2. Components
        3. Supplying standpipe systems
      2. Sprinkler Systems
        1. Classifications
        2. Components
        3. Supplying sprinkler systems
    11. Standard Operating Guidelines
      1. Initial pressures
      2. Tip sizes
      3. Master streams
    12. Fire Ground Operations
      1. Operational considerations
      2. Relay
      3. Tanker/tender operations
      4. Portable tanks
      5. Drafting
    13. Special Systems
      1. Foam
      2. Standpipes
      3. Automatic sprinklers


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 126 - Fire Protection Systems in the Fire Service

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to fire protection systems in the fire service. Includes features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppressions systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe all aspects of sprinkler systems to include components, flow testing and maintenance for residential and commercial systems.
    2. Define the terms of fire detection system and fire suppression system.
    3. Identify the various types of detectors to include fixed-temperature heat, rate-of-rise heat, smoke, flame, fire-gas, and other detection devices.
    4. Describe pump components and accessories require for the installation of a fire pump.
    5. Identify the different classes of standpipe systems and their intended use.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe principles and characteristics of suppression agents.
    2. Describe the basic elements of a public water supply system including the sources, distribution networks, piping and hydrants.
    3. Identify the different types and components of sprinkler, standpipe, and foam systems.
      1. Describe the types and components of standpipe systems.
      2. Explain the inspection, testing and maintenance of standpipe systems.
      3. Name the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards that deal with standpipe systems.
      4. Describe the types and components of fire pumps.
      5. Explain how to conduct a flow test for a fire pump installation.
      6. Name the NFPA standards that deal with fixed fire pumps.
    4. Describe the elements of residential and commercial sprinkler legislation.
    5. Identify the different types of non-water based fire suppression systems.
    6. Explain the basic components of a fire alarm system.
      1. Describe the types and components of fire alarm and detection systems.
      2. Name the NFPA standards that deal with fire alarm and detection systems.
    7. Identify the different types of detectors and explain how they detect fire.
    8. Explain the benefits of fire protection systems in various types of structures
    9. Explain why water is a commonly used extinguishing agent.
    10. Discuss the appropriate application of fire protection systems.
    11. Describe the hazards of smoke and list the four factors that can influence smoke movement in a building.
    12. Explain the operation and appropriate application for the different types of portable fire protections systems.
      1. Explain the criteria for locating fire extinguishers in a business.
      2. Identify the appropriate extinguishing agent with a specific type of fire.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Fire Protection Systems
      1. The role fire protection systems play in protecting life
        1. Safety and welfare
        2. General public and firefighters
      2. Overview of the different types of fire protection systems
      3. The role of codes and standards in fire protection system design
    2. Suppression Agents and Principles
      1. Combustion
      2. Suppression
    3. Water Supply Systems for Fire Protection Systems
      1. Sources for fire protection water supply
      2. Distribution networks
      3. Piping
      4. Hydrants
      5. Utility company interface with the fire department
    4. Water-Based Fire Suppression Systems
      1. Properties of water
        1. Water as an effective extinguishing agent
        2. How water extinguishes fire
      2. Sprinkler systems
        1. Types of systems and applications
        2. Types of sprinklers and applications
        3. Piping, valves, hangers and alarm devices
        4. Fire department operations in buildings with sprinkler systems
      3. Residential sprinkler systems
      4. Residential and commercial sprinkler legislation
      5. Standpipe systems
        1. Types and applications
        2. Fire department operations in buildings with standpipes
      6. Foam systems
      7. Water mist systems
      8. Fire pump
        1. Types
        2. Components
        3. Operation
        4. Fire pump curves
    5. Non-Water Based Fire Suppression Systems
      1. Carbon dioxide systems
        1. Applications
        2. Extinguishing properties
        3. System components
      2. Halogenated Systems
        1. Halon 1301 and the environment
        2. Halon alternatives
        3. Extinguishing properties
        4. System components
      3. Dry/wet chemical extinguishing systems
        1. Extinguishing properties
        2. Applications
        3. UL 300
    6. Fire Alarm Systems
      1. Components
      2. Types of fire alarm systems
      3. Detectors
        1. Smoke
        2. Heat
        3. Flame
      4. Audible and visual devices
      5. Alarm monitoring
      6. Testing and maintenance of fire alarm systems
    7. Smoke Management Systems
      1. Hazards of smoke
      2. Smoke movement in buildings
      3. Types of smoke management systems
      4. Firefighter operations in buildings with smoke management systems
    8. Portable Fire Extinguishers
      1. Types and Applications
        1. Foam
        2. Carbon Oxygen (CO2)
        3. Dry chemical
        4. Halogen
        5. Explosion suppression
        6. Specialized
      2. Selection
      3. Placement
      4. Maintenance
      5. Portable fire extinguisher operations


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 127 - Principles of Emergency Services Safety and Survival

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the basic principles and history related to national firefighter life safety initiatives. Includes cultural and behavioral change, organizational health, safety profile, research investigation, national health and safety, risk management, and publication education of fire and life safety.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the importance of personal and organizational accountability for health and safety throughout the fire service.
    2. Identify why the fire service is focusing greater attention on the integration of risk management with incident management at all levels.
    3. Explain the importance why the fire service is developing and implementing national standards for training, qualifications, and certifications that are equally applicable to all firefighters based on the duties they are expected to perform.
    4. Define why the fire service must investigate all firefighter fatalities, injuries and near misses.
    5. Define why national standards for emergency response policies and procedures should be developed and championed.
    6. Define why public education must receive more resources and be championed as a critical fire and life safety program.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify and explain the 16 life safety initiatives.
    2. Describe how obtaining grants can support safety and survival initiatives.
    3. Describe how the concepts of risk management affect strategic and tactical decision-making.
    4. Illustrate how technological advancement can produce higher levels of emergency services safety and survival.
    5. Discuss how incorporating the lessons learned from investigations can support cultural change throughout the emergency services.
    6. Discuss how adopting standardized policies for responding to emergency scenes can minimize near-misses, injuries, and deaths.
    7. Define and describe the need for cultural and behavioral change within emergency services related to safety, leadership, supervision, accountability, and personal responsibility.
    8. Explain the vital role of local departments in national research and data collections systems.
    9. Describe the need for national training standards related to professional development including qualifications, certifications, and re-certifications.
    10. Explain how the increase in violent incidents impacts safety for emergency services personnel when responding to emergency scenes.
    11. Explain the need for personal and organizational accountability for health and safety.
    12. Discuss the importance of investigating all near-misses, injuries, and fatalities.
    13. Recognize the need for counseling and psychological support for emergency services personnel, their families, as well as, identify access to local resources and services.
    14. Defend the need for annual medical evaluations and the establishment of physical fitness criteria for emergency services personnel throughout their careers.
    15. Describe and evaluate circumstances that might constitute an unsafe act.
    16. Explain the concept of empowering all emergency services personnel to stop unsafe acts.
    17. Discuss the importance of fire sprinklers and code enforcement.
    18. Describe the importance of public education as a critical component of life safety programs.
    19. Explain the importance of safety in the design of apparatus and equipment.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction
      1. History of fire service culture
      2. Organizational culture
      3. Individual role in culture/behavior
      4. History of line of duty deaths and injury statistics
      5. Defining the nature of the problem
      6. Life safety initiatives
    2. The National Context, Health and Safety
      1. National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
      2. Medical and fitness standards
      3. Data collection, national fire incident reporting system (NFIRS)
      4. Research and investigation, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    3. Training, Equipment, Response
      1. Training, education, credentialing
      2. Apparatus and equipment
      3. Emergency response to emergency scenes
      4. Violent accidents
      5. Emerging technologies
    4. Organizational Health and Safety Profile
      1. Personal and organizational accountability
      2. Present condition and culture
      3. Investigations-internal
      4. Analyzing your profile
      5. Utilizing grants to meet needs
    5. Risk Management
      1. Risk management concepts and practices
      2. Unsafe acts
      3. Empowerment definition
    6. Prevention
      1. Home fire sprinklers
      2. Code enforcement
      3. Public education of fire and life safety
      4. Counseling and psychological support


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    FSC 128 - Incident Safety Officer

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Concepts, techniques and skills for the Company Officer (CO) to function as the Safety Officer at fire department incident operations. Includes decision-making skills and personal safety (safety cues). Includes a focus on Safety Officer’s responsibility in responding to incident scenes. Also includes incident-specific, scene-oriented application using safety scenarios.

    Information: This class meets State of Arizona Fire Marshal requirements: NFPA 1983, NFPA 1500 special operations, NFPA 1670.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define the role of the Incident Safety Officer at emergency scenes.
    2. Describe the regulations, standards, and policies as they apply to the ISO.
    3. Define risk management in terms of incident scene safety.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Discuss the role of the Incident Safety Officer (ISO) within the Incident Command System.
    2. Utilize various record-keeping and documentation practices of the ISO.
    3. Identify the role of Risk Management as it relates to the fire service.
    4. Recognize the various emergency incident safety considerations.
    5. Demonstrate key communications and monitoring techniques, which are critical in handling emergency scene safety.
    6. Synthesize and utilize the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to be an Incident Safety Officer (ISO).
    7. Differentiate safe and unsafe actions and operations based on safety cues.
    8. Identify pre-emergency measures that will reduce firefighter injuries.
    9. Assess for risks that may present hazards to firefighting personnel at emergency incidents.

    Outline:
    1. Manuals and introductions
      1. Student manuals.
        1. Issue student manual (SM). Students may want to take notes on real-life examples that the instructor or other students may offer
        2. The SM is essentially a reference work, but will be used for unit activities
      2. Individual student introductions
        1. State name, department, and position
        2. State what you hope to take away with you when you complete the course
        3. Identify an incident safety problem within your department
    2. Goal, Scope and Target Audience
      1. Provide the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to be an effective Incident Safety Officer (ISO)
      2. Scope:  the correct actions for an ISO to take while functioning at an incident
      3. Audience:  Company Officers (CO’s) who are experienced in firefighter safety issues and are familiar with an Incident Command System (ICS)
    3. Course Overview
      1. Role of the Incident Safety Officer
        1. Identify safe and unsafe actions and operations based on safety cues.
      2. Regulations, standards, and policies
        1. Identify applicable regulations, standards, and policies that affect the ISO
      3. Recordkeeping and documentation
        1. Identify the documentation tasks that must be performed by the ISO
      4. Risk management
        1. Define risk management in terms of incident scene safety
        2. Identify pre-emergency measures.
        3. Forecast risks that may present hazards to personnel.
      5. Incident considerations:  communications and monitoring
        1. Working within an ICS
        2. Monitoring actions at an incident
        3. Making changes to department policy and procedures based on incident outcome
      6. Personal checklist
        1. Allows students an opportunity to evaluate their departments’ ISO programs.
    4. Story of the Incident Command System
      1. Impetus for the development of an improved interagency incident management system
        1. Devastating wildland fires in Southern California in the early 1970’s
        2. Examining various aspects of interagency response to incidents
      2. FIRESCOPE
      3. Evaluate acronym, which derives its name from:
        1. Fire Resources of California
        2. Organized for potential emergencies
      4. Primarily a command and control system delineating job responsibilities and organizational structure
      5. Purpose is the management of day-to-day operations for any emergency or non-emergency situation
      6. Flexible enough to manage catastrophic incidents involving thousands of emergency response and management personnel
    5. National Inter-Agency Incident Management System (NIIMS)
      1. Developed by the wildland community to provide a common system for wildland fire protection agency use at local, State, and Federal levels
      2. The NIIMS organization includes the following agencies:
        1. Bureau of Land Management
        2. Bureau of Indian Affairs
        3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
        4. U.S. Forest Service
        5. Representatives of State foresters
        6. National Park Service
      3. Consists of five major subsystems:
        1. The ICS
          1. Operating requirements
          2. Eight interactive components
          3. Procedures for organizing and operating an on-scene management structure
          4. Standardized training
        2. Nationwide qualifications and certification system
        3. Publications management
        4. Supporting technologies
      4. Need for a single ICS
        1. Inconsistencies in the system began to develop, and hybrid systems came into existence
        2. Single system is critical to effective command and control of major incidents
        3. Reduce inherent confusion that may be associated with larger scale incidents where local, State, and Federal agencies work together
      5. National Fire Service Incident Management System Consortium
        1. Created in 1990 to evaluate an approach to developing a single Command system
        2. Purpose was to determine what ICS would look like in the future
        3. Consortium consists of many individual fire service leaders, representatives of most major fire service organizations, and representatives of Federal agencies, including FIRESCOPE
        4. Identified the need to develop operational protocols within ICS, so that fire and rescue personnel would be able to apply the ICS as one common system
        5. Model Procedures Guide for Structural Firefighting
        6. First Consortium document that was completed (1993)
        7. Basic premise is that now the organizational structure found in the FIRESCOPE ICS is enhanced with operational protocols
        8. Protocols allow the Nation’s fire and rescue personnel to apply the ICS effectively, regardless of area of the country
    6. National Fire Academy (NFA)
      1. Adopted FIRESCOPE ICS in 1980
      2. Has incorporated this material into its training curriculum
    7. Other FIRESCOPE Model ICS applications
      1. Multi-casualty
      2. Hazardous Materials
      3. Urban Search and Rescue (US&R)
    8. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) formally adopted FIRESCOPE ICS as the Incident Management System for any Federal Response
    9. Summary
      1. Review administrative issues if there are any questions
      2. The ISO must have the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to perform effectively at an incident
        1. Functions of the on-scene safety officer
        2. Audience should be CO’s familiar with safety issues
        3. Safety cues
        4. This concept will be used throughout the course
        5. Safety cues are conditions or indications that the ISO needs to be aware of at an incident scene
        6. These conditions or indications could be structural, unsafe acts by personnel, or unsafe conditions
        7. The experienced ISO, when operating at an incident scene, will focus on these safety cues


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 130 - Strength and Fitness for the Fire Service

    1 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    .5 lecture periods 1.5 lab periods

    Overview of fitness as it pertains to prospective firefighters. Includes endurance training, flexibility training, strength conditioning and use of equipment in Fire Incident Readiness Evaluation.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the physical requirements for performing basic firefighting tasks.
    2. Demonstrate proper exercise techniques for specific conditioning programs and perform specific manipulative firefighter tasks.  
    3. Explain the physical and mental aspects of well-being and conditioning and how health and fitness relate to performance, productivity and quality of life in the workplace. Discuss how the aforementioned relate to proper training and effective physical and mental performance.   
    4. Apply skills of physical and mental aspects of performance required in physical agility testing and firefighting and explain the relationship between firefighter fitness evaluations and the physical agility pre-employment tests.
    5. Explain the relationship of proper nutrition to total fitness and explain the impact of protective clothing on the physical performance of firefighters.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe the physical requirements for performing basic firefighting tasks.
    2. Explain the relationship of proper nutrition to total fitness.
    3. Explain the impact of protective clothing on the physical performance of firefighters.
    4. Explain the physical and mental aspects of well-being and conditioning.
    5. Demonstrate proper exercise techniques for specific conditioning programs.
    6. Explain the relationship between proper training and effective physical and mental performance.
    7. Apply skills of physical and mental aspects of performance required in physical agility testing and firefighting.
    8. Perform specific manipulative firefighter tasks.
    9. Explain the relationship between firefighter fitness evaluations and the physical agility pre-employment tests.
    10. Contrast and compare firefighter health and fitness to performance, productivity, and quality of life in the workplace.

    Outline:
    1. Physical Requirements of Firefighting
      1. Flexibility
      2. Aerobic conditioning
      3. Muscular strength
      4. Muscular endurance
    2. Nutrition
      1. Basic balanced diet
      2. Specialized diets
    3. Firefighting Environment
      1. Micro effects of inside protective clothing
      2. Macro environment of outside protective clothing
    4. Physical Aspects of Well-Being and Conditioning
      1. Exercise principles
        1. General adaptation
        2. Specificity of training
        3. Overload principle
      2. Exercise physiology
        1. Aerobic and anaerobic energy sources
        2. Muscle physiology
        3. Recovery from undertraining and overtraining
        4. Myotatic stretch reflex
        5. Physical effects of environment
        6. Injury prevention
    5. Proper Exercise Techniques
      1. Flexibility
      2. Weight training
      3. Specialized programs
      4. Implementation of organizational programs
    6. Firefighting
      1. Equipment
        1. Hydrant
        2. Ladders
        3. Hose evolutions
        4. Others equipment
    7. Mental Aspects of Performance
      1. Stress model
      2. Relaxation techniques
      3. Focus training
      4. Visualization
      5. Performance keys
      6. Mastering skills
    8. Tasks
      1. Ventilation
      2. Search and rescue
      3. Others
    9. Physical Agility Preparation
      1. Physical and mental fitness
      2. Mastering motor skills
      3. Pre-employment evaluation
    10. Lifelong Fitness and Conditioning
      1. Physiologic change and the aging process
      2. Changes in job requirements


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 149 - Fire Operations I

    4 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Specialized classroom and practical experience in the techniques of firefighting. Includes the chemistry of fire, use of water and other agents, firefighting equipment and its uses, firefighting practices and safety.

    Information: Completion of FSC 149 and FSC 150  will help prepare the student for successful completion of State of Arizona Firefighter I & II practical evaluations. Only when taken as a part of the Pima Community College Fire Academy can students be concurrently enrolled in FSC 149 and FSC 150 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Students will be able familiar with agencies that regulate fire and demonstrate knowledge of the properties, characteristics and classes of fire.
    2. Students will know the importance of and how to utilize the different types of personal protective equipment necessary to maintain a safe environment.
    3. Students will be familiar with the different types of ladders, as well as how to use and maintain them.
    4. Students will be able to utilize different types of fire extinguishers and will have an extensive knowledge base related to what extinguishing agents to use for different types of fires.
    5. Students will be able to explain the reasons ventilation may be necessary, and to determine what types of ventilation will be most beneficial for different types of fires.
    6. Students will be knowledgeable about all of the tolls and hoses on the apparatus.  They will be able to utilize and maintain all of the tools on the apparatus.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify the various agencies that regulate the fire service.
    2. Discuss the properties and characteristics of fire.
    3. List the appropriate personal protective equipment for a given situation.
    4. Put on a self-contained breathing apparatus within National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) guidelines.
    5. Describe the classes of fire.
    6. Describe the appropriate extinguishing agent for a specific class of fire.
    7. Describe the chemical and physical nature of different extinguishing agents.
    8. Demonstrate the use of different types of fire extinguishers on different classes of fires.
    9. Describe the different types of hose and appliances.
    10. Demonstrate the advancement of hose lines.
    11. Demonstrate the maintenance of hose and appliances.
    12. Describe the different types of fire service ladders.
    13. Demonstrate raising and lowering different types of ladders.
    14. Demonstrate the maintenance of fire service ladders.
    15. Locate tools carried on a fire apparatus.
    16. Demonstrate the appropriate use of fire service hand tools.
    17. Explain the different types of ventilation
    18. Identify the reasons for the ventilation.
    19. Discuss the importance of firefighter safety.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction and Orientation
      1. Rules and regulations
      2. Manuals and procedures
      3. Agencies
    2. Fire Behavior
      1. Chemistry and properties of fire
      2. Heat and combustion
    3. Personal Protective Equipment
      1. Turnouts
      2. Breathing Apparatus
        1. Types
        2. Use
        3. Maintenance
    4. Fire Extinguishers
      1. Classes of fire
      2. Extinguishing agents
    5. Fire Hose and Appliances
      1. Sizes and types
      2. Identification, selection and use of nozzles
      3. Maintenance
    6. Fire Extinguishment
      1. Fire streams
      2. Fire protection systems
      3. Water supply systems
    7. Ladders
      1. Types
      2. Use
      3. Maintenance
    8. Tools and Equipment
      1. Types
      2. Use
      3. Maintenance
    9. Ventilation
      1. Vertical
      2. Horizontal
      3. Mechanical
    10. Firefighter Safety
      1. Equipment
      2. Fire fighting


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/2022
  
  •  

    FSC 150 - Fire Operations II

    4 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 149 . Specialized classroom and practical experience in the practices and techniques of fire fighting. Includes principles of community fire defense, methods of entry, rescue, tools, apparatus, equipment, salvage, hydraulics, and fire extinguishment.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
    Information: Completion of FSC 149  and FSC 150 will help prepare the student for successful completion of State of Arizona Firefighter I & II practical evaluations. Only when taken as a part of the Pima Community College Fire Academy can students be concurrently enrolled in FSC 149  and FSC 150.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify different techniques for handling a rescue.
    2. Describe the primary functions of the Engine Company and Ladder Company.
    3. Show knowledge of using a fire hydrant and the ability to connect hoses and nozzles appropriately to develop a water supply line.
    4. Demonstrate of when and how to utilize different types of ventilation.
    5. Address the necessity for customer service skills to be utilized when dealing with an emergency.
    6. Describe some of the benefits of public education.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify the appropriate tools used for forcible entry.
    2. Tie three fire department knots.
    3. Demonstrate a right hand or left hand search of a building.
    4. Explain the functions of an engine company.
    5. Demonstrate advancing a pre-connected 1¾” hose line.
    6. Demonstrate making a water supply line with large diameter hose.
    7. Demonstrate advancing a hose line in coordination with other members.
    8. Explain the workings of a fire hydrant.
    9. Describe the different phases of burning.
    10. Demonstrate the appropriate use of different types of nozzles.
    11. Explain the functions of a ladder company.
    12. Demonstrate the appropriate technique for roof ventilation.
    13. Demonstrate the technique for positive pressure ventilation.
    14. Identify common roof types and construction in the Tucson area.
    15. Explain the purpose of overhaul.
    16. Demonstrate the use of a salvage cover.
    17. Explain the importance of fire prevention.
    18. Identify common fire hazards found in business occupancies.
    19. Explain the importance of customer service.

    Outline:
    1. Rescue
      1. Forcible entry
      2. Ropes and knots
      3. Extrication
    2. Engine Company Operations
      1. One person hose operations
        1. Hose handling
        2. Supply lines
        3. Hose appliances
      2. Team hose operations
        1. Advancing lines on grade
        2. Advancing lines above and below grade
        3. Large stream devices
        4. Protection systems
      3. Water supply
        1. Hydrants
        2. Static sources
        3. Testing and records
      4. Firefighting
        1. Phases of burning
        2. Fire stream application
        3. Safety
    3. Ladder Company Operations
      1. Ventilation
      2. Tools
      3. Roof types
      4. Salvage and overhaul
    4. Fire Prevention
      1. Public education
      2. Introduction to fire codes
    5. Communications
      1. Use of the radio
      2. Order model


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    FSC 153 - Hazardous Materials

    1.5 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    1.25 lecture periods .75 lab periods

    Basic chemical concepts and their applications to the field of fire science. Includes classes and properties of hazardous materials; recognition and identification of materials; management of materials in transit, in use, and in storage; and management of hazardous materials incidents.

    Information: Equivalent to State of Arizona’s First Responder, 40-hour course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe terminology and principles for Hazardous Material incidents.
    2. Describe the Incident Management System and function of the different branches.
    3. Identify Federal, State and local agencies requirements and standards for Hazardous Materials.
    4. Describe protective equipment and measures to be taken during a hazardous material incident.
    5. Describe the Department of Transportation (DOT) marking, placarding and labeling of products.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. List the key regulatory standards that impact the management of hazardous materials.
    2. Describe the following toxicological principles: exposure, toxicity, contamination, dose/response relationship, routes of exposure, chronic/acute exposure.
    3. Describe the following toxicological terms and describe their significance: parts per million (ppm), lethal dose (LD50), lethal concentration (LC50), threshold limit value-time weighted average (TLV/TWA), and threshold limit value-ceiling (TLV/C).
    4. Identify the key element of the Incident Management System necessary to coordinate response activities at a hazardous materials incident.
    5. Identify and describe the duties and functions of the Hazardous Materials (HM) Branch within the Incident Management System.
    6. Identify the guidelines for the safe approach and positioning of response personnel at a HM incident.
    7. Define and describe the significance of staging.
    8. Identify the procedures required to protect the public at a HM incident.
    9. Describe the role of security and law enforcement officers at a HM incident.
    10. Identify the procedures for establishing scene control through the use of control zones.
    11. Explain the difference between evacuation and protect-in-place.
    12. List and describe the basic methods of identifying hazardous materials.
    13. Identify the basic design and construction features of bulk packages, nonbulk packages and storage vessels.
    14. Identify each of the railroad tank cars and Intermodal tank containers by type.
    15. Describe the specialized marking systems found at fixed facilities.
    16. Describe the Department of Transportation (DOT) specification markings for nonbulk and bulk packaging.
    17. Identify and describe placards, labels, markings and shipping documents used for the transportation of hazardous materials.
    18. Describe the concept of hazard assessment and risk evaluation.
    19. Identify the types of hazard and response information available from each of the following resources and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each resource: reference manuals, technical information centers, material safety data sheets, monitoring instruments.
    20. Define the following terms and their impact and significance on the selection of chemical protective clothing: degradation, penetration, permeation, breakthrough time, permeation rate.
    21. Identify the process and factors to be considered in selecting the proper level of protective clothing and respiratory protection at a HM incident.
    22. Describe the advantages, limitations and proper use of different types of protective clothing and respiratory protection at a HM incident.
    23. Define the terms: strategic goals and tactical goals.
    24. Identify and describe the application, advantages and limitations of the following methods of spill control: absorption, adsorption, covering, damming, dicing, dilution, diversion, dispersion, retention, vapor suppression.
    25. Define and describe the difference between direct contamination and cross contamination.
    26. State the general conditions that require an emergency decontamination.
    27. Describe the stations in the decontamination sequence for conducting field decontamination.
    28. Describe the importance of a post-incident analysis of a HM incident.
    29. Identify the regulatory reporting requirements of federal, state and local agencies.

    Outline:
    1. Hazardous Materials Management System
      1. Definitions
      2. Laws, regulations and standards
      3. Management system
    2. Health and Safety
      1. Toxicology
      2. Health and safety management procedures
      3. Site safety practices and procedures
    3. Incident Management System (IMS)
      1. IMS overview
      2. Command operations
      3. HM Branch operations
    4. Site Management and Control
      1. Establishing command
      2. Approach and positioning
      3. Isolation procedures
      4. Hazard control zones
      5. Evacuation and isolation-in-place
    5. Recognition and Identification
      1. Methods and procedures
      2. Reference sources
    6. Hazard and Risk Evaluation
      1. Hazard and risk assessment
      2. Sources of information
      3. Evaluating risk
      4. Terrorism
    7. Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment
      1. Basic principles
      2. Level of protective clothing
    8. Implementing Response Objectives
      1. Basic principles
      2. Goals and objectives
      3. Spill and leak control and containment
      4. Special tactical problems
    9. Decontamination
      1. Decontamination methods
      2. Clean-up
      3. Terminating the incident 


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 160 - Wildland Firefighting

    2 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    1.5 lecture periods 1.5 lab periods

    Basic wildland firefighting. Includes locating and reporting the fire, incident operations and management, suppression equipment, fire behavior, size-up, methods of suppression, and safety.

    Information: This course meets Arizona Center for Fire Service Excellence and Arizona Department of Forestry Guidelines for Wildland Firefighting Training.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify and describe the contributing factors and indicators that affect the start, spread and rapid increase of wildland fire for the safe and effective fire management activities.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge in the preparation and proper and safe use of all common PPE, tools, resources and equipment used in effective fire management activities
    3. Demonstrate knowledge in all NWCG created safety tools designed to insure adequate hazard assessment and clear communications.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge in the national, state and local agencies organization and resource deployment   utilized in the control of wildfire.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of wildfire suppression strategy and tactics.
    6. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of common non-wildland fire related exposures, including threatened structures and hazardous material, which commonly complicate or threaten the wildland fire arena.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Discuss the relationship between State and local government wildland firefighting organizations and the federal wildland firefighting organizations.
    2. Identify and discuss: the three sides of the fire triangle; the environmental factors of wildland fire behavior that affect the start and spread of wildland fires; and the situations that indicate problem or extreme for behavior.
    3. Demonstrate the use of portable weather equipment.
    4. Identify parts of a fire and define fire behavior and other useful firefighting terms.
    5. Explain the importance of the proper use and maintenance of assigned Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
    6. List the benefits of maintaining a high level of physical fitness and health and staying hydrated can reduce firefighting fatigue.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of the National Interagency Incident Management System (NIIMS), Incident Command System (ICS) and the firefighter’s chain of command as it relates to an incident.
    8. Demonstrate familiarity with the Fireline Handbook and Incident Response Pocket Guide, identifying types and cultural differences of resources utilized in wildland fire operations.
    9. Identify the Watch Out Situations and common denominators on tragedy fires.
    10. Apply the appropriate Standard Firefighting Orders to minimize the potential for serious injury or death.
    11. Describe how Lookouts, Communications, Escape Routes and Safety Zones (LCES) is related to the Standard Firefighting Orders (SFO).
    12. Discuss the function, inspection and care of the fire shelter and demonstrate its proper deployment and use.
    13. Identify safety hazards and explain how Human Factors, Situational Awareness, Risk Management, communications, and teamwork affect the risk of injury.
    14. Identify safety procedures as applicable to travel to and from the fire.
    15. Demonstrate the proper use, handling and maintenance of commonly used hand tools.
    16. Demonstrate the proper use, handling and maintenance of commonly used fire ignitions tools.
    17. Identify and demonstrate the proper use, handling and care of commonly used water tools including the backpack pump, fire hose lines, and couplings, adaptors and accessories.
    18. Describe and demonstrate hose lay and fire stream methods.
    19. Describe the methods and hazards of suppressing wild fires utilizing various fire control lines and identify threats to the fire line and personnel.
    20. Describe coordination techniques of crews and explain tactical considerations utilizing various resources.
    21. Describe a systematic method of locating spot fires and other considerations when patrolling a fire.
    22. Describe the proper procedures, use, and care of radio equipment.
    23. Explain the importance of and techniques for mop up of a wildland fire.
    24. Explain the importance of an “After action Review” and how it relates to the Wildland Firefighter.
    25. Explain the general guidelines when reacting to a possible hazardous materials emergency.
    26. Identify the wildland/urban interface watch out situations and personnel safety concerns in wildland/urban interface fires.
    27. Demonstrate the proper set up and operation of a portable pump
    28. Find a geographic location on a map and determine the legal description, as defined by the Public Land Survey System, and vice versa.

    Outline:
    1. Course Introduction and Overview of Wildland Firefighting
      1. Introduction of course, instructors, students, and course requirements
      2. Operation of state firefighting organizations
      3. Interagency relationships
      4. Role of local fire department
    2. Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior
      1. Basic fire behavior concepts
        1. Fire triangle
        2. Heat transfer
        3. Fuels
      2. Topography
      3. Fire weather
    3. Fire Terminology
      1. Parts of the fire
      2. Fire behavior terms
      3. Other useful terms in firefighting
    4. Firefighter Preparedness
      1. PPE
      2. Accountability
      3. Physical fitness
      4. Hydration
      5. Personal and camp hygiene
    5. Incident Command System (ICS)
      1. Chain of command
      2. ICS structure
      3. Responsibilities of each ICS sections
    6. Resource Classification
      1. Crew typing
      2. Machine typing
      3. Cultural differences
    7. Firefighter Safety
      1. Watch outs situations and standard fire orders
      2. Common denominators of tragedy fires
      3. LCES
      4. Fire shelter deployment
      5. Human factors
        1. Communications
        2. Situational awareness
        3. Risk management
    8. Travel Safety
      1. Travel to and from fire assignments
      2. Various modes of transportation
    9. Hand Tools
      1. Use
      2. Care
      3. Maintenance
    10. Ignition Devices
      1. Fuse
      2. Drip torch
    11. Water Tools
      1. hoses
      2. backpack pumps
      3. appliances
    12. Suppression
      1. methods of attack
      2. suppression techniques
      3. coordinated crew techniques
      4. engine tactics
      5. retardant operations
    13. Patrol and Communications
      1. Patrol considerations
      2. Radio(s) use and procedures
    14. Mop Up
      1. Dry mop up
      2. Wet mop up
      3. Machine piles
      4. Cold trailing
    15. Practical Skills Lab
      1. Fire shelter drill and deployment
      2. Fireline construction and hand tool maintenance
      3. Portable pump operations
      4. Progressive hose lays
    16. Hazardous Material
      1. Guidelines
      2. Clues for detection
    17. Wildland and Urban Interface (WUI)
      1. WUI Watch Outs
      2. Safety considerations
    18. Portable Pumps
      1. Types
      2. PPE
    19. Locating and Reporting a Fire
      1. Maps and mapping systems
      2. Standard mapping symbols and legends
      3. Public land survey system and legal descriptions
      4. Land ownership, geographic locations, and acreage estimations
      5. Fire reporting information and recordkeeping


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 163 - Fire Apparatus and Equipment

    3 Credits, 3.5 Contact Hours
    2.75 lecture periods .75 lab periods

    Overview, concepts, and techniques to use fire equipment. Includes automotive apparatus (pumpers, aerial ladders, lift platforms, hose wagons, transports and utility vehicles), water towers, heavy auxiliary mechanical equipment and appliances, generators, compressors, rescue and forcible entry tools and cutting torches.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  and FSC 150 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the history and evolution of types of fire apparatus, uses of fire apparatus, and equipment.
    2. Demonstrate safe and competent methods of operating Fire Apparatus and Equipment. 
    3. Demonstrate and Conduct a fire apparatus annual pump test per NFPA Standards.
    4. Describe the appropriate maintenance of fire apparatus and equipment.
    5. Describe the process in which to properly specify all fire apparatus and equipment.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe the evolution of fire apparatus and equipment through history.
    2. Identify and describe the types and uses of fire apparatus and equipment.
    3. Describe the construction of fire apparatus and equipment.
    4. Demonstrate the safe and competent use of different types of fire apparatus and equipment.
    5. Conduct a pump test on a fire apparatus to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards.
    6. Describe the appropriate maintenance of fire apparatus and equipment.
    7. Construct design specifications for a piece of fire service equipment as an aid to its selection and purchase

    Outline:
    1. History and Development of Fire Equipment
      1. Fire apparatus
    2. Apparatus
      1. Construction
      2. Operation
      3. Maintenance and troubleshooting
        1. Apparatus
        2. Equipment
    3. Pumps
      1. Pump accessories
      2. Pumping procedures
      3. Testing
      4. Maintenance and troubleshooting
    4. Procedures
      1. Engine
      2. Aerial ladder
      3. Aerial platform
      4. Other specialized equipment
      5. Specifications and purchasing


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 170 - Fire Service Leadership

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Practical training for fire service leadership and supervision. Includes decision-making, problem solving, running a meeting, managing multiple roles, creativity, power, and ethics. Also includes situational leadership, delegation, coaching, and discipline.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
    Information: This course meets National Fire Academy (NFA) requirements for Leadership I, II, and III. FSC 170A , FSC 170B , and FSC 170C  together constitute FSC 170.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define basic decision-making styles.
    2. Describe the requirements for running an effective meeting.
    3. Identify typical multiple roles and responsibilities of a company officer.
    4. Identify the importance of creativity and innovation in fire service organizations.
    5. Identify the basic leadership behaviors and styles.
    6. Identify the levels of employee development.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Match appropriate decision-making styles to given situations.
    2. Cite the advantages and potential disadvantages of group decision-making.
    3. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of individual and group problem-solving.
    4. Identify the major techniques for maximizing individual participation in the group process, brainstorming and nominal group technique.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to facilitate the nominal group technique and brainstorming process.
    6. Outline the critical steps in a problem-solving model.
    7. Discuss the necessity for having planned meetings.
    8. Identify types of meetings and the importance of the meeting agenda.
    9. Identify possible sources of role conflict for the company officer.
    10. Develop and apply a strategy for resolving role conflicts.
    11. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of role modeling in the fire service.
    12. Discuss the value of diversity in the fire service.
    13. Define creativity and innovation.
    14. Identify ways of fostering creativity in subordinates.
    15. Use effective techniques for selling new ideas.
    16. Identify the types of power.
    17. State the sources and limits of different types of power.
    18. Differentiate between the use and abuse of different types of power.
    19. Identify techniques for enhancing a power base.
    20. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance and impact of ethics upon the fire department and its members.
    21. Demonstrate an ability to make decisions involving ethical practices.
    22. Describe the steps in handling an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) complaint.
    23. Demonstrate the ability to match employee development with leadership styles.
    24. Identify ways of matching leadership styles to diverse populations of employees.
    25. Define delegation and identify the benefits derived from and the barriers that prevent effective delegation.
    26. Identify the four critical coaching techniques.
    27. Define coaching techniques and demonstrate the ability to match coaching techniques with subordinate performance.
    28. Demonstrate an understanding of the uses of discipline to correct improper employee behavior.
    29. Identify methods for applying discipline consistently, fairly, and impartially.

    Outline:
    1. Decision Making Overview
      1. Advantages
      2. Disadvantages
      3. Leader’s role
      4. Decision-making styles
      5. Selecting the right style
    2. Groups
      1. Using groups effectively
      2. Techniques to maximize group participation
    3. Problem Solving
      1. Responsibilities of company officer
      2. Problem solving model
      3. Nominal group technique (NTG)
        1. Silent generation of ideas
        2. Recording ideas
        3. Clarification
        4. Voting
        5. Scoring
      4. Brainstorming
    4. Meetings
      1. Requirements
      2. Types of Meetings
      3. Requirements for running a successful meeting
      4. Meeting agenda importance
    5. Managing Multiple Roles
      1. Company officer and organization role
      2. Role expectations
      3. Sources of role conflict
      4. Role conflict strategy
      5. Role modeling
      6. Handling diversity
      7. Value of diversity in the fire service
    6. Creativity and Innovation
      1. Definition
      2. Elements of creativity and innovation
      3. Creativity  and innovation blocks
      4. Fostering creativity
      5. Selling ideas
    7. Power
      1. Definition
      2. Sources and types of power
      3. Responses to power
      4. Effective use of power
      5. Power skills
      6. Building a power base
    8. Ethics
      1. Definition and importance
      2. Roots of ethics
      3. Principles of ethical behavior
      4. Ethical decision-making
    9. EEOC and the Fire Service
      1. Sources of information
      2. Steps in handling complaints
    10. Situational Leadership
      1. Definition
      2. Leadership styles
      3. Employee development levels
      4. Matching leadership styles with employee development levels
      5. Matching leadership styles to diverse populations
    11. Delegation
      1. Definition
      2. Principles of effective delegation
      3. Benefits and barriers to effective delegation
    12. Coaching
      1. Definition and coaching techniques
      2. Characteristics of an effective coach
      3. Matching coaching style with employee development
      4. Training versus counseling
    13. Discipline
      1. Definition
      2. Positive versus negative discipline
      3. Correcting behavior
      4. Rules and regulations
      5. Progressive discipline
      6. Disciplinary interview
      7. Consistency in discipline methods


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 170A - Fire Service Leadership I

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Practical training for fire service leadership and supervision. Includes decision-making, problem solving, and running a meeting.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
    Information: This course meets National Fire Academy (NFA) requirements for Leadership I, II, and III. FSC 170A, FSC 170B  and FSC 170C  together constitute FSC 170 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define basic decision-making styles.
    2. Describe the requirements for running an effective meeting.
    3. Cite the advantages and potential disadvantages of group decision-making.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Match appropriate decision-making styles to given situations.
    2. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of individual and group problem-solving.
    3. Identify the major techniques for maximizing individual participation in the group process, brainstorming and nominal group technique.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to facilitate the nominal group technique and brainstorming process.
    5. Outline the critical steps in a problem-solving model.
    6. Discuss the necessity for having planned meetings.
    7. Identify types of meetings.
    8. Describe the importance of a meeting agenda.

    Outline:
    1. Decision Making Overview
      1. Advantages
      2. Disadvantages
      3. Leader’s role
      4. Decision-making styles
      5. Selecting the right style
    2. Groups
      1. Using groups effectively
      2. Techniques to maximize group participation
    3. Problem Solving
      1. Responsibilities of company officer
      2. Problem solving model
      3. Nominal group technique (NTG)
        1. Silent generation of ideas
        2. Recording ideas
        3. Clarification
        4. Voting
        5. Scoring
      4. Brainstorming
    4. Meetings
      1. Requirements
      2. Types of Meetings
      3. Requirements for running a successful meeting
      4. Meeting agenda importance


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 170B - Fire Service Leadership II

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 170A . Includes practical training for fire service leadership and supervision. Also includes managing multiple roles, creativity, power, and ethics.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
    Information: This course meets National Fire Academy (NFA) requirements for Leadership I, II, and III. FSC 170A , FSC 170B, and FSC 170C  together constitute FSC 170 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify typical multiple roles and responsibilities of a company officer.
    2. Identify the importance of creativity and innovation in fire service organizations.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance and impact of ethics upon the fire department and its members.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify possible sources of role conflict for the company officer.
    2. Develop and apply a strategy for resolving role conflicts.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of role modeling in the fire service.
    4. Discuss the value of diversity in the fire service.
    5. Identify ways of fostering creativity in subordinates.
    6. Use effective techniques for selling new ideas.
    7. Identify the types of power.
    8. State the sources and limits of different types of power.
    9. Differentiate between the use and abuse of different types of power.
    10. Identify techniques for enhancing a power base.
    11. Demonstrate an ability to make decisions involving ethical practices.
    12. Describe the steps in handling an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) complaint.

    Outline:
    1. Managing Multiple Roles
      1. Company officer and organization role
      2. Role expectations
      3. Sources of role conflict
      4. Role conflict strategy
      5. Role modeling
      6. Handling diversity
      7. Value of diversity in the fire service
    2. Creativity and Innovation
      1. Definition
      2. Elements of creativity and innovation
      3. Creativity  and innovation blocks
      4. Fostering creativity
      5. Selling ideas
    3. Power
      1. Definition
      2. Sources and types of power
      3. Responses to power
      4. Effective use of power
      5. Power skills
      6. Building a power base
    4. Ethics
      1. Definition and importance
      2. Roots of ethics
      3. Principles of ethical behavior
      4. Ethical decision-making
    5. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Fire Service
      1. Sources of information
      2. Steps in handling complaints


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 170C - Fire Service Leadership III

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 170B . Includes practical training for fire service leadership and supervision. Also includes situational leadership, delegation, coaching, and discipline.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
    Information: This course meets National Fire Academy (NFA) requirements for Leadership I, II, and III. FSC 170A , FSC 170B , and FSC 70C together constitute FSC 170 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the basic leadership behaviors and styles.
    2. Identify the levels of employee development.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to match employee development with leadership styles.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify ways of matching leadership styles to diverse populations of employees.
    2. Define delegation and identify the benefits derived from and the barriers that prevent effective delegation.
    3. Identify the four critical coaching techniques.
    4. Define coaching techniques and demonstrate the ability to match coaching techniques with subordinate performance.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the uses of discipline to correct improper employee behavior.
    6. Identify methods for applying discipline consistently, fairly, and impartially.

    Outline:
    1. Situational Leadership
      1. Definition
      2. Leadership styles
      3. Employee development levels
      4. Matching leadership styles with employee development levels
      5. Matching leadership styles to diverse populations
    2. Delegation
      1. Definition
      2. Principles of effective delegation
      3. Benefits and barriers to effective delegation
    3. Coaching
      1. Definition and coaching techniques
      2. Characteristics of an effective coach
      3. Matching coaching style with employee development
      4. Training versus counseling
    4. Discipline
      1. Definition
      2. Positive versus negative discipline
      3. Correcting behavior
      4. Rules and regulations
      5. Progressive discipline
      6. Disciplinary interview
      7. Consistency in discipline methods


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 173 - Records and Reports

    0.5 Credits, 0.5 Contact Hours
    .5 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the elements and qualities of good report writing and comprehensive documentation. Includes form, style, and methodologies for writing various reports, techniques for developing an accurate narrative, and proper and improper conclusions. Also includes effective and correct use of grammar and the mechanics of writing.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the characteristics of good reports and field notes.
    2. Demonstrate the techniques of writing a complete, descriptive, and accurate narrative.
    3. Discuss the difference between an administrative and operational report.
    4. Demonstrate correct writing mechanics and the use of proper grammar.

    Outline:
    1. Reports and Field Notes
      1. Characteristics of good reports
      2. Taking field notes
    2.  Elements of Composition
      1. Proper and improper conclusions
      2. Obtaining information
    3.  Elements of  Reports
      1. Administrative
      2. Operational
    4.  Writing Mechanics
      1. Grammar
      2. Proper writing


    Effective Term:
    Full Calendar Year 2009/2010
  
  •  

    FSC 174 - Fire Investigation I

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to fundamental concepts of fire scene investigation. Includes emergency responder responsibilities and observations, conducting origin and cause interpretation, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and elements of fire dynamics.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define how constitutional amendments apply to fire investigations and how case law decisions affected fire investigations.
    2. Explain the role of the fire setter and their motives to start fires.
    3. Define the process of investigating a fire to include of conducting fire origin and cause, conducting an investigation using the scientific method and the process of performing a fire investigation.
    4. Define methods for case investigation, importance of documentation, proper preparation of records and reports and how this translates into preparing for a court session to include proper courtroom demeanor and techniques for giving testimony.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify the responsibilities of a firefighter when responding to the scene of a fire, including scene security.
    2. Demonstrate the importance of documentation and evidence preservation process needed for successful resolution.
    3. Identify the processes of proper documentation.
    4. Describe the implications of constitutional amendments as they apply to fire investigations.
    5. Identify key case law decisions that have affected fire investigations.
    6. Define investigation terms and techniques of the combustion process to assist the untrained investigator or attorney.
    7. Explain the basic elements of fire dynamics and how they affect cause determination.
    8. Compare the types of building construction on fire progression.
    9. Describe how fire progression is affected by fire protection systems and building design.
    10. Discuss the basic principles of electricity as an ignition source.
    11. Determine potential health and safety hazards.
    12. Describe the process of conducting investigations using the scientific method.
    13. List and identify the agencies involved in arson investigation and describe the techniques used to achieve cooperation and information from these agencies.
    14. Define methods for case investigation and proper preparation of records and reports.
    15. Describe proper courtroom demeanor and techniques for giving testimony.
    16. Define the process of conducting fire origin and cause.
    17. Identify cause and origin, and differentiate between accidental and incendiary.
    18. Explain the procedures used for investigating vehicle fires.
    19. Identify the characteristics of an incendiary fire and common motives of the fire setter.

    Outline:
    1. Emergency Responder Responsibilities and Observations
      1. Responsibilities of the fire department
      2. Responsibilities of the firefighter
      3. Responsibilities of the fire officer
      4. Observations when approaching the scene
      5. Observations upon arrival
      6. Observations during firefighting
      7. Identification of incendiary devices
    2. Constitutional Law
      1. Criminal law
      2. Constitutional amendments
    3. Case Studies
      1. Michigan v. Tyler
      2. Michigan v. Clifford
      3. Daubert decision
      4. Benfield decision
      5. Kuhmo v. Carmichael decision
    4. Fire Investigations Terminology
      1. Terms as they apply to structural fires
      2. Terms as they apply to vehicle fires
      3. Other common investigative terms
    5. Basic Elements of Fire Dynamics
      1. Ignition
      2. Heat transfer
      3. Flame spread
      4. Burning rate
      5. Fire plumes
      6. Fire analysis
    6. Building Construction
      1. Types of construction
      2. Building materials
      3. Building components
    7. Fire Protection Systems
      1. Extinguishment systems
      2. Detection systems
      3. Signaling systems
      4. Other building services
    8. Basic Principles of Electricity
      1. Basic electricity
      2. Wiring systems
      3. Common electrical systems
    9. Health and Safety
      1. Methods of identification
      2. Common causes of accidents
      3. Common causes of injuries
    10. Fire Scene Investigations
      1. Examining the fire scene
      2. Securing the fire scene
      3. Documenting the fire scene
      4. Evidence collection and preservation
      5. Exterior examination
    11. Investigation
      1. Cooperative agencies
      2. Sources of information
    12. Case Investigation and Preparation
      1. Witnesses
      2. Arrest and detention
      3. Records and reports
    13. Courtroom Demeanor and Testimony
      1. Testifying
      2. Expert witness
    14. Determining Point of Origin
      1. Interior examination
      2. Area of origin
      3. Fire patterns
      4. Other indicators
      5. Scene reconstruction
      6. Point of origin
    15. Types of Fire Causes
      1. Accidental
      2. Natural
      3. Incendiary
      4. Undetermined
    16. Vehicle Fires
      1. Examination of scene
      2. Examination of exterior
      3. Examination of driver and passenger areas
      4. Examination of engine compartment
      5. Examination of fuel system
      6. Examination of electrical system
    17. Fire Setters
      1. Characteristics of arson
      2. Common motives


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 180 - Driver Training for Fire Service

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Techniques for driving and handling fire vehicles. Includes safe operating procedures, defensive driving, apparatus inspection, training in emergency maneuvers, and the key components of the driving system.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 149 FSC 150  and FSC 151.
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the major considerations in preparing to drive a fire vehicle.
    2. Differentiate and describe the major critical driving situations.
    3. Identify the techniques required to handle critical driving situations.
    4. Demonstrate safe operating procedures, including driver preparation and types of vehicular maneuvers.
    5. Discuss vehicle dynamics including kinetic energy, centrifugal forces, inertia, coefficient of friction, and tires.
    6. Demonstrate the use emergency maneuvers.
    7. List the key components of the driving system.
    8. Explain the facilities and equipment required to create and maintain a driving course.

    Outline:
    1. Driver Preparation
      1. Seat adjustment
      2. Hand position
      3. Mirrors
      4. Instrument panel
    2. Vehicle Dynamics Theory
      1. Kinetic Energy
      2. Centrifugal Forces
      3. Inertia
      4. Coefficient of Friction
      5. Tires
    3. Vehicle Dynamics - Application
      1. Serpentine
      2. Evasive procedures
      3. Controlled braking
      4. Skid control
      5. Off-road recovery
      6. Blowouts
    4. Facilities and Equipment
      1. Layout
      2. Safety aspects
      3. Vehicle preparation
      4. Special equipment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2008/09
  
  •  

    FSC 252 - Fire Service Strategy and Tactics

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Principles and tactics of fire service ground control. Includes fireground factors and management, command operations and functions, life safety, personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents.

    Information: This class is in compliance with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) model curriculum. This is the capstone course for degree.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Systems (ICS) as related to strategy and tactics, and create a strategy and evaluate rescue options.
    2. Explain the components of building construction and why pre-fire planning and review is significant to the success of life safety and fire-ground management.
    3. Define the importance of fire-ground communications and the components of the initial radio report.
    4. Explain the factors during size-up, significance of each factor, and analyze their relationship to effective fire-ground management.
    5. Compare an offensive fire attack to a defensive fire attack, explaining the basics of each and identifying the rationale for each strategy.
    6. Define and describe the significance of overhaul and salvage at emergency incidents.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Discuss fire behavior as it relates to strategies and tactics.
    2. Create a strategy and implement appropriate tactics.
    3. Identify and categorize various types of fire apparatus and extinguishing equipment.
    4. Identify the basics of building construction and how they interrelate to pre-fire planning and strategy and tactics.
    5. Describe the steps taken during size-up.
    6. Explain the main components of pre-fire planning and identify steps needed for a pre-fire plan review.
    7. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Systems (ICS) as related to strategy and tactics.
    8. Demonstrate the various roles and responsibilities in ICS/NIMS.
    9. List factors to be considered during size-up and define the significance of each factor.
    10. Examine the significant of fire ground communications.
    11. List fireground factors and incident priorities and analyze their relationship to effective fireground management.
    12. Describe basic command operations and list basic components of an initial radio report.
    13. Describe and evaluate strategic and tactical rescue options.
    14. Describe the methods used for effective exposure protection.
    15. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of master stream devices.
    16. Describe the contributing factors of confinement applicable in fire service company operations.
    17. Explain the relationship and proper use of ventilation during offensive extinguishment operations.
    18. Define and describe the significance of overhaul and salvage at emergency incidents.

    Outline:
    1. Fire Chemistry Terms and Concepts
      1. Heat transfer
      2. Principles of fire characteristics of materials
      3. Fire classifications
    2. Extinguishing Equipment
      1. Extinguishing equipment
      2. Fire apparatus
      3. Personnel requirements
    3. Visual Perception
      1. Pre-planning
      2. Size-up
    4. Pre-Fire Planning
      1. Concept
      2. Phases
      3. Methods
      4. Format
      5. Occupancy classifications
      6. Building types
    5. Fireground Management Principles
      1. Incident management systems
      2. Characteristics of command
      3. Pre-planning
      4. Action plans
      5. Incident priorities
      6. Firefighter safety
    6. Basic Division Tactics
      1. Size-Up
        1. Facts
        2. Probabilities
        3. Own Situation
        4. Decision
        5. Plan of Operation
    7. Fireground Factors
      1. Building construction
      2. Fire location and extent
      3. Building occupancy
      4. Life hazards and location
      5. Area around building
      6. Resources
      7. Arrangement and environmental factors
      8. Special-systems and other concerns
      9. Apparatus placement
        1. Offensive attack
        2. Defensive attack
    8. Exposure protection
      1. Safety considerations from a command perspective
        1. Incident safety officer
    9. Coordinating Activities
      1. Decision-making
      2. Command operations and functions
        1. Assumption and confirmation and position
        2. Situation evaluation
        3. Communications
          1. Initial actions
          2. Initial radio report
          3. Scene evaluation
          4. Order model
        4. Strategy, attack plan, and assigning of units
        5. Development of fireground organization
        6. Attack plan
          1. Review
          2. Evaluation
          3. Revision of attack plan
        7. Command
          1. Continuing
          2. Transferring
          3. Terminating command
    10. Rescue
      1. Life safety problems of fire
      2. Determination of life hazard
      3. Rescue resources and operations
    11. Exposures
      1. Principle of contributing factors
      2. Exposure protection operations
    12. Fire stream management
      1. Heavy stream devices
      2. Handlines
      3. Tactical use of protective systems
    13. Confinement
      1. Fire separations
      2. Fire loading
      3. Built-in protection
      4. Operations
    14. Ventilation
      1. Relationship to objectives
      2. Equipment
      3. Roof types
      4. Methods
    15. Salvage
      1. Relationship to objectives
      2. Equipment
      3. Operations during fire
      4. Operations after fire


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    FSC 260 - Fire and Emergency Services Instructor

    2 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Theoretical and practical training in developing and instructing fire and emergency services training programs. Includes an exploration of safety and legal issues, adult learning psychology, developing, planning and presenting effective instruction, evaluating student learning, teaching diverse learners, and use of instructional media.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 189
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course concurrently with FSC 189. Meets the requirements for the Arizona State Fire Marshal Instructor I certification and NFPA 1041.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the role of the emergency services instructor.
    2. Define the three learning domains and discuss their significance in the learning process.
    3. Define learning style and discuss the various styles or senses through which students learn.
    4. Deliver a presentation from the instructor guide or lesson plan.
    5. Participate in a critique to discuss presentation techniques.
    6. Explain the purpose of evaluation and describe tasks required for evaluating courses and instructional design.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Discuss characteristics that make an effective instructor.
    2. List the components of the communications model and discuss factors that aid in communicating effectively.
    3. List professional development resources, programs and opportunities.
    4. Discuss how and why instruction is important to the organization.
    5. Explain the instructor’s role in reinforcing safety and following the organization’s safety plan.
    6. Discuss the purpose of copyright laws and the requirements to be followed when using the works of others.
    7. State the importance of maintaining and securing records and reports.
    8. Discuss the instructor’s role in influencing learning.
    9. Define motivations and discuss its major theories, relating them to ways in which instructors can motivate students to learn.
    10. Prepare a presentation using a prepared instructor guide or lesson plan.
    11. Demonstrate appropriate instructional behaviors and mannerisms.
    12. List physical aspects of learning environments and discuss how the setting plays a major role in learning.
    13. Differentiate the types of torts and the significance of each in emergency services training.
    14. Discuss the various aspects of liability and the responsibilities associated with them.
    15. List and discuss the various legal protections available for instructors.
    16. Explain instructor obligations for reporting substance abuse and steps to be taken to assist the suspected abuser.
    17. Discuss how instructional methods affect the process of learning and remembering.
    18. List and discuss various factors that may affect learning and determine those that enhance learning.
    19. List and discuss various characteristics that shape learners and influence their ability.
    20. List and discuss methods that instructors can use to manage individual learners.
    21. List and examine steps for preparing to teach.
    22. Differentiate the various instructional delivery methods and determine those that are appropriate for certain types of emergency services training lessons.
    23. Discuss the requirements and considerations needed for planning practical training evolutions in permanent and acquired facilities.
    24. List the safety steps to consider and implement when planning practical training evolutions.
    25. Determine criteria for selecting the appropriate instructional media.
    26. Demonstrate the operation and use of commonly used instructional media.
    27. Explain the purpose of testing and describe the classification of tests.
    28. Describe and perform methods of scoring and interpreting test data.
    29. Review and apply the steps for creating tests and develop a test that includes each type of test question based on lesson objectives.
    30. Review and apply the steps for evaluating tests and decide whether results indicate accomplishment of the behavioral objective.

    Outline:
    1. Challenges of Emergency Service Instruction
      1. The role of the instructor
      2. Communication model
      3. Importance of instruction
    2. Safety
      1. Instructor’s role in safety
      2. Safety resources
    3. Legal Considerations
      1. Types of laws
      2. Responsibility and liability
      3. Legal protection
    4. Psychology of Learning
      1. Learning processes
      2. Learning styles
      3. Motivation
      4. Learner characteristics
      5. Managing individual learners
    5. Instructional Delivery
      1. Presentation guidelines, methods and techniques
      2. Preparation
    6. Practical Training
      1. Planning
      2. Safety
      3. High-hazard training
    7. Instructional Media
      1. Selecting appropriate media
      2. Utilizing media
      3. Troubleshooting and maintenance
    8. Testing and Evaluation
      1. Purposes of testing
      2. Testing methods and techniques
      3. Creating and evaluating tests
      4. Scoring and interpreting


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 270 - Leadership I for Fire Service Executives

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Concepts, techniques, and application of effective executive leadership. Includes leadership styles and characteristics, the effective executive, and leaders with vision, influence and motivation. Also includes being a change facilitator in a traditional organization, and the future of leadership.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 170  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the characteristics of an effective executive and how effectiveness can be learned.
    2. Synthesize and discuss the many elements of organizational change theory and how you can facilitate the technical changes and the personal changes.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Explain the leadership paradox of being the visionary, giving the organization direction, while working within a realistic context.
    2. List examples of leaders who would be successful in a global, technological, socially competitive society.
    3. Differentiate techniques for creating a culture with leaders at all levels of the organization and give examples of the one that may be most effective for you.
    4. Utilize concepts and techniques to cope with various leadership challenges of the present and future.

    Outline:
    1. Leaders, Heroes, CEOs, and Celebrities
      1. Similarities
      2. Differences
    2. Leadership Styles and Characteristics
      1. Sharks
      2. Dolphins
      3. Ostrich and others
    3. The Effective Executive
      1. Trust and credibility
      2. Maximizing resources
      3. Diversity
      4. Development of other leaders
    4. Leaders and Managers with Heads in the Clouds and Feet on the Ground
      1. Vision
      2. Influence
      3. Motivation
    5. Being a Change Facilitator in a Traditional Organization
      1. Change theory
      2. The role of the change agent, manager, and facilitator
    6. Leaders of the Future: Same or Different?
      1. Organizations
      2. Motivation
      3. Many leaders within a traditional hierarchy
      4. Legal issues and policy development
      5. Social and community issues
      6. Power, politics, and partnerships (sharing power)
    7. Your Future as a Leader
      1. Career management, leaving a legacy, transactional and transformational
      2. Leading the metropolitan fire service agency of the future


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 271 - Leadership II for Fire Service Executives

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 270 . Includes organizational structure, roles and responsibilities, and organizational values. Also includes organizational vision, fiscal management and priorities, innovative organizations, and executive leadership.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 270  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the organizational history including people and events.
    2. Define supervision, management, and leadership in a fire service organization.
    3. Examine and describe the vision for the future.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Explain the organizational culture.
    2. Synthesize and describe the organizational values.
    3. Apply principles of fiscal management to internal and external financial resources.

    Outline:
    1. Organization Culture
      1. Elements of culture
      2. Power structures and influences
      3. Creating culture
      4. Managing the culture
    2. Roles and Responsibilities
      1. Supervision
      2. Management
      3. Leadership
    3. Organization
      1. Values
      2. Vision
      3. Fiscal management and priorities
      4. Innovative Organizations In Search of Excellence
      5. Executive Leadership for Organizational Excellence
      6. Self knowledge
      7. Taking risks
      8. Persistence
      9. Commitment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 272 - Leadership III for Fire Service Executives

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 271 . Includes communication skills, presentation skills, and verbal and writing skills at an executive level. Also includes interpersonal skills, labor relations, conflict management, ethical and unethical persuasion, and the media.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 271  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss and demonstrate techniques of persuasive oral and written communication.
    2. Synthesize and apply communication skills in negotiating through a basic communication process

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Demonstrate presentation techniques for meetings, seminars, public forums, and professional conferences.
    2. Diagnose your own style of interpersonal communication and that of others.
    3. Explain and demonstrate conflict situations and the appropriate actions to manage each situation.

    Outline:
    1. Communication Skills for Executives
      1. Definitions
      2. Examples
      3. Situations and techniques
      4. Organizational theories
    2. Presentation Skills
      1. Written
      2. Oral
      3. Technical
    3. Skills at an Executive Level
      1. Verbal applications
      2. Writing applications
    4. Interpersonal Skills
      1. One-on-one
      2. Groups
      3. Teams
    5. Labor Relations
      1. Negotiation
      2. Collaboration
    6. Conflict Management
      1. Communication skills resolution
    7. Ethical and Unethical Persuasion
      1. Openness and inquiry
      2. Falsification, deception, disqualification, misdirection
    8. The Media
      1. Print
      2. Non-print


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 273 - Leadership IV for Fire Service Executives

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 272 . Includes the local fire department in relation to its city government, local policy development. Also includes legal aspects of the city and department procedures, relationships with organized labor, networking and community relations, relations with local and state fire service providers, and understanding the national and international fire service.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 272  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the multiple relationships of a fire department and its local community.
    2. Develop a plan for networking with public and private agencies and community organizations.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Identify the political and business processes of the local municipality and their legal aspects.
    2. Synthesize local, state, national, and international trends of the fire service.

    Outline:
    1. Local Fire Department and City Government Relationship
      1. Sources of social stability
      2. Economic development
      3. Power structures
      4. Dealing with multiple constituencies
    2. Local Policy Development
      1. Social engineering
      2. Relevant operations to the culture and community
    3. How Local Educational Systems Work
      1. Kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12)
      2. Community colleges
      3. Universities
    4. Legal Aspects of City and Department Procedures
      1. Employment
      2. American for Disabilities Act (ADA)
      3. Liability
      4. Risk management
    5. Networking and Community Relations
      1. Techniques of networking
      2. Partnerships
    6. Relations with Local and State Fire Service Providers
      1. Pima County fire chiefs
      2. State fire marshal
    7. National and International Fire Service Providers


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 274 - Leadership V for Fire Service Executives

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Continuation of FSC 273 . Includes reasoning, thinking patterns, problem identification, and problem solving strategies. Also includes problem solving styles, decision- making models and approaches, personal decision making, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): FSC 273  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Differentiate between creative and routine thinking patterns.
    2. Explain the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Discuss the information gathering methods used by managers.
    2. List the four problem-solving styles of managers, including their strengths and weaknesses, and identify each student’s style.
    3. Utilize at least four decision-making strategies and evaluate the appropriateness to various situations

    Outline:
    1. Reasoning
      1. Inductive
      2. Deductive
    2. Thinking Patterns
      1. Blooms taxonomy
      2. Creativity and innovation
    3. Problem Identification
      1. Situational analysis
      2. Perception
      3. Stereotyping
      4. Halo effect
      5. Interviews and surveys
    4. Problem Solving Strategies
      1. Individual
      2. Group
      3. Relationship to leadership style
    5. Problem Solving Styles of Leaders
      1. Myers-Briggs sensing
      2. Myers-Briggs feeling
      3. Identify one’s own style
    6. Decision-Making Models and Approaches
      1. Continuum of approaches from authoritarian to participative
      2. Situational analysis of which model to use
    7. Personal Decision Making
      1. Self-renewal
      2. Career renewal
    8. Evaluation
      1. Approaches and alternatives
      2. Evaluation short and long term
      3. Quantitative and qualitative
      4. Formative and summative


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 280 - Fire Chief Preparation

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Preparation for professional fire personnel to become chief officers. Includes incident command, communication, and disaster management.

      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Compare business decision-making with fire service administrative decision making.
    2. Demonstrate how quality circles can be installed in the fire service.
    3. Identify the concept of human resource management.
    4. Note characteristics of fire department budgeting.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Describe the contingency or situational approach to management.
    2. Contrast traditional, human relations, and human resources approaches to management.
    3. Explain the general theory of budgeting.
    4. Expand on the management of material resources.
    5. Define “fire loss management.”
    6. Indicate how the management of the fire department is increasing in legal complexity.
    7. Report how the law affects personnel management.
    8. State the functions of the Fire Department as programs.
    9. Synthesize and apply results oriented management.
    10. List key components of Management by Objectives (MBO).
    11. Use the characteristics of effective performance appraisal.
    12. Describe the implications of changing labor relations for fire service management.
    13. List the steps involved in labor negotiations within a unionized Fire Department.
    14. Differentiate disasters from smaller emergencies.
    15. Analyze comprehensive emergency management.
    16. Explain the role of incident command system (ICS) in emergency management.
    17. Examine factors leading to fire department involvement in emergency medical service.
    18. Deduce problems related to implementing an emergency medical systems (EMS) program.
    19. Specify methods related to administering an EMS program.
    20. Forecast the outlook for emergency medical services in the future.
    21. List and describe the duties of a fire prevention bureau.
    22. Determine the importance of public education in relation to fire prevention.
    23. Illustrate the political and legal implications and the importance of complete current and accurate records for the fire prevention manager.
    24. Define “comprehensive code administration.”
    25. Show the interrelationship among these four terms: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.
    26. Diagram the steps in developing an emergency management plan.

    Outline:
    1. Management and Organizational Behavior
      1. Organization and management
        1. Formal theories of public organization
        2. Approaches to management
        3. Organizational principles
        4. Organizational change
      2. Resource management
        1. Managing human resources
        2. Managing material resources
        3. Productivity improvement
      3. Program management
        1. Environment of program management
        2. Management basics
        3. Setting program objectives
        4. Implementation
        5. Evaluation
    2. Strategic Analysis of Fire Department Operations
      1. Emergency management
        1. Fire service role
        2. Evolution of Federal Emergency Management policy
        3. Mitigation options
        4. Preparedness
        5. Response
        6. Recovery
      2. Emergency Medical System  (EMS)
        1. Planning for EMS
        2. Alternative operational plans
        3. Management issues
      3. Fire prevention/code enforcement
        1. Prevention
        2. Comprehensive code administration
    3. Public Finance
      1. Budget, finance and cost containment
      2. Budgetary setting
      3. Theory of budgeting
      4. Types of budgets
      5. Budget controls
      6. Cost pressures and cost containment
      7. Budget preparation
      8. Budget presentation
    4. Legal Aspects of the Fire Department
      1. Civil rights obligations
      2. Tort liability
      3. Conflict of interest
    5. Personnel Issues
      1. Personnel management
        1. Human resource planning
        2. Position classification
        3. Job analysis
        4. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) laws and affirmative action
        5. Recruitment
        6. Performance appraisal
      2. Labor management relations
        1. Organizing efforts and procedures
        2. Bargaining
        3. Impasse resolution
        4. Grievances
        5. Discipline
    6. Disaster Management
      1. Control of fire department operations at catastrophic disasters
        1. Incident command
        2. Impact of natural disasters
          1. Earthquakes
          2. Hurricanes
          3. Floods
          4. Tornadoes
      2. Integrated emergency management system


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2017/18
  
  •  

    FSC 289 - Current Issues in Fire Science

    2 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 3 lab periods

    Study of current issues in the fire service. Includes developing and writing an independent, applied research project, utilizing various computer applications for formatting and design, and use of the Internet and library resources.

    Recommendation: WRT 101  or an equivalent AGEC course that prepares student to complete the independent research project which requires college level writing skills.
    Information: Completion of twenty credits in FSC prefix courses is required before enrolling in this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate a familiarity with a variety of research methodologies.
    2. Develop a research topic based on a fire service issue.

    Performance Objectives:
    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Conduct an independent applied research project utilizing an American Psychological Association (APA) format.
      1. Identify a critical issue within the fire service as determined by previous experience and/or course work.
      2. Conduct a meta-analysis of relevant source material on the stated issue.
      3. Write an applied research paper according to predetermined formatting guidelines.
      4. Provide recommendations for addressing the stated issue.
      5. Demonstrate a familiarity with a variety of research methodologies, including the library and internet.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to use basic computer applications, including word processing and data bases, to format and compose an applied research paper.
    3. Differentiate levels of validity and credibility of source material.
      1. Identify legitimate and credible source material.
      2. Evaluate the quality of various types of source material.
      3. Develop a logical hypothesis based upon the findings.
    4. Defend the findings and recommendations of the final report.
      1. Discuss the validity of individual research methods.
      2. Discuss the logic of the analysis of the source material.
      3. Discuss the applicability of the final recommendations.

    Outline:
    1. Purpose of Research
      1. Discovery and interpretation of data
      2. Interpretation of facts and critical thinking
      3. What is ‘applied’ research?
      4. Professionalism – What does it mean?
    2. Discussion of research methods
      1. Historical
      2. Descriptive – Meta-analysis
      3. Correlational
      4. Experimental
    3. Technology
      1. Review of Pima Community College home page and access
      2. Computer applications utilized in formatting a research paper
        1. Word Processor
      3. Computer applications utilized in analyzing and manipulating data
        1. Data Base
    4. Research Resources
      1. Library
        1. Local
        2. National Fire Academy Learning Center
      2. Internet
        1. Identifying valid and credible source material
        2. Review relevant source sites
      3. Organizing source material
    5. Developing a research paper
      1. Abstract
      2. Table of Contents
      3. Introduction
        1. Background
        2. Problem statement
        3. Purpose statement
        4. Research questions and hypothesis
      4. Literature Review
        1. Citing sources
        2. Summarizing sources
      5. Procedures and Methodology
        1. Analyzing data
        2. Manipulating data
      6. Discussion
        1. Interpreting results
        2. Comprehensive analysis of the data
        3. Compare and contrast different source findings
        4. Provide implications to the fire service
      7. Recommendations
        1. Logically relates to the research
        2. Feasibility of application
      8. References
        1. Proper formatting of source material


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19