Jan 28, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Legend for Courses

HC/HN: Honors Course  IN/IH: Integrated lecture/lab  LB: Lab  LC: Clinical Lab  LS: Skills Lab  WK: Co-op Work
SUN#: is a prefix and number assigned to certain courses that represent course equivalency at all Arizona community colleges and the three public universities. Learn more at www.aztransfer.com/sun.

 

Medical Laboratory Technician

  
  •  

    MLT 100 - Phlebotomy for Medical Laboratory Technology

    2 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Theory of basic phlebotomy techniques and procedures. Includes instruction for blood collection, patient care, quality assurance standards, medical terminology, anatomy, blood collection procedures, variables, computers and specimen processing, and point of care (POC) testing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 156IN  or BIO 160IN  or BIO 201IH  or BIO 201IN  or BIO 202IN .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 100LB  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    MLT 100IN - Phlebotomy for Medical Laboratory Technology

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Theory and practice of basic phlebotomy techniques and procedures. Includes blood collection for patient care, quality assurance standards, medical terminology, anatomy, blood collection procedures, variables, computers and specimen processing, and point of care (POC) testing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 156IN  or BIO 160IN  or BIO 201IH  or BIO 201IN  or BIO 202IN .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate good specimen collection technique while employment safety and HIPAA standards that apply to phlebotomy practice.
    2. Define basic medical terms and codes related to phlebotomy and laboratory testing.
    3. Identify phlebotomy-related vascular anatomy and cellular components.
    4. Demonstrate appropriate use of equipment and collection tubes for obtaining blood specimens using venipuncture, capillary collection, and point of care instruments (POC).
    5. Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, participating in problem solving and class discussions.

    Outline:
    1. Blood Collection for Patient Care
      1. Role of phlebotomist in healthcare setting
      2. Policies and procedures
      3. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability regulations
      4. Ethical and legal issues
    2. Quality Assurance Standards
      1. Regulatory agencies
      2. Standards and indicators
      3. Infection control
      4. Safety and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
      5. Personal wellness
    3. Medical Terminology
      1. Key terms
      2. Abbreviations and codes
    4. Anatomy
      1. Human vascular anatomy
      2. Identify veins and other blood vessels for blood collection
      3. Blood composition and formed elements
      4. Identify blood composition and formed elements
    5. Blood Collection Procedures
      1. Supplies
      2. Equipment selection
        1. Venipuncture
        2. Capillary puncture
        3. Blood cultures
      3. Patient preparation and identification
      4. Vacuum tube additives
      5. Order of draw
      6. Proper specimen labeling
      7. Special consideration
      8. Therapeutic drug levels
      9. Specimens for transfusion processing
      10. Blood cultures
    6. Variables
      1. Pre-analytical errors
      2. Restricted vascular access
      3. Contamination
      4. Failure to obtain specimen
      5. Special needs patients
      6. Infants and small children
      7. Problem sites
    7. Computers and Specimen Processing
      1. Laboratory information systems
      2. Interfaces
      3. Aliquot preparation
      4. Delivery and storage
    8. Collection of samples, performing Point of Care (POC) Testing
      1. Hemoglobin
      2. Glucose
      3. Coagulation
      4. Bleeding time
    9. Alternate collection sites and procedures
      1. Butterfly collections – hand, wrist, small veins
      2. Adjusting a needle, failure to obtain specimen
      3. Problem or difficult patients, restricted vascular access


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
  •  

    MLT 100LB - Phlebotomy for Medical Laboratory Technology Lab

    1 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Practice of basic phlebotomy techniques and procedures. Includes blood collection for patient care, quality assurance standards, medical terminology, anatomy, blood collection procedures, variables, computers and specimen processing, and point of care (POC) testing.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 156IN  or BIO 160IN  or BIO 201IH  or BIO 201IN  of BIO 202IN .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 100  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    MLT 199 - Introductory Co-op: Phlebotomy Lab Assisting

    1.5 Credits, 1.5 Contact Hours
    1.5 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Principles of job success in a medical lab setting. Includes laboratory workplace skills, communication skills, time and energy management, managing stress, career information, and preparing for employment. Also includes principles, theories, and practices in the career field; and problems in the work situation.

    Prerequisite(s): MLT 100IN  (or MLT 100  and MLT 100LB ).
    Corequisite(s): MLT 199WK  
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Employ good oral and written communication skills.
    2. Apply techniques for managing time, stress, and energy for job efficiency. 
    3. Create a resume and cover letter for use when applying for laboratory jobs.
    4. Evaluate and practice established HIPAA privacy and safety practices in the laboratory

    Outline:
    1. Laboratory Workplace Skills
      1. Culture, attitudes, and etiquette
      2. Safety
      3. Ethics
    2. Communication Skills
      1. Importance in job success
      2. Developing oral  and listening skills
      3. Developing written skills
    3. Time and Energy Management
      1. Identifying resources and their uses
      2. Techniques for managing job efficiency
      3. Prioritize workload
    4. Managing Stress
      1. Characteristics and causes of stress
      2. Techniques for managing job stress
    5. Career Information
      1. Review of career in field of study
      2. Sources of career information
      3. Uses of career information
      4. Career objectives and plans
    6. Preparing for Employment
      1. Identifying varied job markets and selecting job markets appropriate to your career objectives and plans
      2. Aspects of presenting oneself for employment
        1. Job information
        2. Resume writing
        3. References
    7. Principles, Theories, and Practices in the Career Field
      1. Application in the work situation
      2. Ongoing discussion
      3. Understanding through application
    8. Problems in the Work Situation
      1. Problem types identified
      2. Ways of dealing with problems encountered – ongoing discussion each session


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
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    MLT 199WK - Introductory Co-op Work: Phlebotomy Lab Assisting

    1.5 Credits, 4.5 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 4.5 lab periods

    A supervised cooperative work program for students in an occupation related area. Clinical coordinators work with students and their preceptors in a hospital, clinic laboratory, or outpatient collection station. The student develops competency and improved self-confidence when collecting and processing blood, urine or other body fluid samples in the laboratory workplace.

    Prerequisite(s): MLT 100IN  (or MLT 100  and MLT 100LB ).
    Corequisite(s): MLT 199  
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. Students complete 68 clock hours of supervised placement at approved work site.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply principles, knowledge, and skills of patient identification, sample collections, and processing while improving team building skills learned in the classroom. 
    2. Perform sixty-eight (68) clock hours of supervised clinical training in a laboratory setting, the majority which must be in an accredited laboratory.
    3. Perform a minimum of one hundred (100) successful unaided blood collections, including dermal punctures and venipunctures.

    Outline:
    1. Clinical Site Assigned
      1. On-Site Supervisor
      2. Student’s objectives and activities
      3. Expectations
        1. Professionalism, workplace rules
        2. 68 hours of clinical training
        3. 100 successful unaided blood collections
        4. Other fluid samples collected
    2. Team Building Skills
    3. Review Progress
      1. Student review of performance
      2. Job-site supervisor review of performance
        1. Hours completed
        2. Knowledge
          1. Blood collections completed
          2. Fluid samples collected
          3. Competency
        3. Review completion of student’s objectives/activities
        4. Self-Confidence


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
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    MLT 230 - Immunohematology and Immunology

    4.00 Credits, 4.00 Contact Hours
    4.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to basic immunohematology related to methods utilized in the clinical laboratory. Includes discussion of donor blood collection, blood components, immunology and complement, principles of serological testing, genetics, blood group systems, identification of unexpected antibodies, and neonatal and obstetrical transfusion practice. Also includes antiglobulin testing, positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT), gel and solid phase testing, pre-transfusion compatibility testing, transplantation and molecular testing, International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) product labeling, adverse effects of blood transfusions, immune hemolysis, and quality assurance.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 230LB  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    MLT 230IN - Immunohematology and Immunology

    5 Credits, 7 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to basic immunology related to methods utilized in the clinical laboratory. Includes blood collection, blood components, immunology and complement, principles of serological testing, genetics, blood group systems, antiglobulin testing, gel and solid phase testing, and identification of unexpected antibodies. Also includes neonatal and obstetrical transfusion practice, pre-transfusion compatibility testing, International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) product labeling, adverse effects of blood transfusions, positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT), immune hemolysis, quality assurance, transplantation, and molecular testing.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN , and MAT 151  or assessment intoMAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.   Explain the donor selection process, product preparation, processing, International Society of Blood   Transfusion (ISBT) labeling, testing, and use of blood components.

    2.   Identify, define, and distinguish the immune processes as they relate to immunohematology and the       characteristics of antigens and antibodies of the ABO, Rh, and other blood group systems.

    3,   Obtain accurate results using a variety of methods on samples including ABO, Rh, DAT, IAT, crossmatch,       phenotype (and control selection), donor selection; and test for adverse effects of transfusions. 

    4.   Identify units, reagents and samples using standard labeling practices.

    5.   Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and      participating in problem solving discussions.


    Outline:
    1. Blood Collection
    2. Blood and Blood Components
    3. Immunology and Complement
    4. Principles of Serological Testing in Immunohematology
    5. Genetics
    6. ABO and H Blood Group Systems
    7. Rh Blood Group System
    8. Other Blood Group Systems
    9. Antiglobulin Testing
    10. Gel and Solid Phase Testing
    11. Identification of Unexpected Antibodies
    12. Neonatal and Obstetrical Transfusion Practice
    13. Pre-Transfusion Compatibility Testing
    14. International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) Product Labeling
    15. Adverse Effects of Blood Transfusion
    16. Investigation of the Positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT) and Immune Hemolysis
    17. Quality Assurance
    18. Transplantation
    19. Molecular Testing


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
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    MLT 230LB - Immunohematology and Immunology Lab

    1.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Application and practice of techniques for basic immunohematology related to methods utilized in the clinical laboratory. Includes ABO and Rh typing, indirect/direct antiglobulin test (IAT/DAT), antibody screens, Ab identification and phenotyping, pre-transfusion testing, work-ups for adverse effects of transfusions, hemolytic disease, and maternal and neonatal testing. Also includes tube testing, MTS gel and solid phase (capture) techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 230  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    MLT 240 - Urinalysis and Body Fluids

    2.00 Credits, 2.00 Contact Hours
    2.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the fundamental clinical lab techniques of urine and body fluids testing. Includes discussion of collection, physical and chemical examination, microscopic examination, body fluids, and individual fluids.

     

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 240LB  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.



  
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    MLT 240IN - Urinalysis and Body Fluids

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the fundamental clinical lab techniques of urine and body fluids. Includes collection, physical and chemical examination, microscopic examination, body fIuids, and individual fluids.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN , and MAT 151  or assessment into MAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.   List the normal and abnormal constituents/composition and function of urine and selected body fluids, and   evaluate their clinical significance. 
    2.   Discuss evaluation and interpretation of test outcomes and correlate test results with patient condition(s). 

    3.   Use the examination of samples to determine the presence of normal and abnormal   constituents/composition of urine and selected body fluids, and evaluate their clinical significance. 
    4.   Assess samples for proper collection and perform analysis of urine, fecal, and body fluid samples, including    use and calculations for hemocytometer counting chamber.
    5.   Evaluate and interpret laboratory test outcomes and correlate test results with patient condition(s). 
    6.   Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and participating in problem solving discussions.


    Outline:
    !.       Urine Collection Methods and Rejection Criteria for Each

             A.   Random

             B.   Timed

             C.   Clean catch

             D.   Midstream

             E.   Catheterization

             F.   Suprapubic aspirate

    II.       Anatomical Areas of the Kidney and the Physiologic Function of Each 

    III.      Appropriate Specimen Handling

             A.   Preservatives for timed urine specimens

             B.   Chemical changes preservatives may cause

             C.   Procedures for obtaining optimal results

                  1.   Renal disease

                  2.   Glucose tolerance

                  3.   Pregnancy test

                  4.   Quantitative creatinine or urea

                  5.   Fecal analysis

    IV.     Urinalysis Results

             A.   Microscopic components of normal and abnormal urine samples

             B.   Significance of each

    V.      Diagnostic Testing of Other Body Fluids

             A.   Normal presentation

             B.   Indications for collection

             C.   Collection methods

             D.   Testing methods

             E.   Interpretation of results

             F.   Significance in diagnosis of disease states

             G.   Body fluids

                   1.   Cerebrospinal

                   2.   Synovial

                   3.   Pleural

                   4.   Pericardial

                   5.   Peritoneal

                   6.   Amniotic

                   7.   Seminal

                   8.   Vaginal

                   9.   Gastric

                   10.  Saliva

    VI.     Urine Collection

             A.   Specimen methods of collection

                   1.   Collection and testing random urine specimen

                   2.   Collection and testing midstream clean catch specimen

                   3.   24-Hour (timed) specimen collection procedure

                   4.   Clean catch specimen collection: male/female

             B.   Specimen rejection

                   1.   Contaminated specimens

                   2.   Mislabeled

                   3.   Nonmatching requisition forms

                   4.   Unpreserved

                   5.   Improperly transported

    VII.    Collection and Use of Specimens with Appropriate Preservatives

             A.   Advantages and disadvantages

                   1.   Refrigerated specimen

                   2.   Sodium fluoride

                   3.   Light gray C&S tube

                   4.   Yellow UA plus tube

             B.   Physical and chemical changes in urine specimen

                   1.   Unrefrigerated urine

                   2.   Unpreserved urine

                   3.   Effects of bacterial growth on color, clarity, and chemistry results

    VIII.    Calculations Using Results Obtained from Testing

             A.   Glomerular filtration rate

             B.   Creatinine clearance

             C.   Osmotic gap

             D.   Hemocytometer (body fluids)

    IX.     Physical and Chemical Examination of Urine

             A.   Evaluation of color and clarity on urine specimens

             B.   Urine concentration

                   1.   Osmolality (osmometer)

                   2.   Specific gravity (refractometer)

                   3.   Ionic strength (reagent dipstick)

             C.   Reagent dipstick chemistry analysis of urine

                   1.   pH

                   2.   Protein

                   3.   Glucose

                   4.   Bilirubin

                   5.   Ketones

                   6.   Nitrite

                   7.   Blood

                   8.   Leukocytes

                   9.   Urobilinogen

                   10.  Specific gravity

                   11.  Ascorbic acid

             D,   Sources of error

                   1.   Proper reagent dipstick technique

                   2.   Adulterated specimens

                   3.   Interfering substances

                   4.   Confirmatory tests

                         a.   Clinitest

                         b.   Ictotest

                         c.   Refractometer

                   5.   Correlating chemistry and microscopic results

             E.   Microscopic examination of urine

                   1.   Standardized microscopic examination

                         a.   KOVA standard urinalysis system

                         b.   Non-standard conical tube system

                   2.   Formed elements in urine sediment

                         a.   Red blood cells

                         b.   White blood cells

                         c.   Renal tubular epithelial cells

                         d.   Transitional epithelial cells

                         e.   Casts

                         f.    Crystals

                         g.   Bacteria

                         h.   Sperm

                         i.    Mucous

                         j.    Artifacts

                         k.   Oval fat bodies

                         l.    Eosinophils

    X.      Gross Evaluation Including Color, Clarity and Rejection Criteria on Body Fluids

             A.   Synovial

             B.   Pleural

             C.   Pericardial

             D.   Peritoneal

             E.   Amniotic

             F.   Seminal

             G.   Vaginal

             H.   Gastric

    XI.     Calculation of Number of Cells in a Variety of Body Fluids Using Dilution Factors and Hemocytometer Counts 

             A.   Origin

             B.   Indications for collection

             C.   Procedures for laboratory evaluation

             D.   Interpretation and diagnosis

    XII.    Cell Differentiations, Morphology Evaluation, Analyte Quantitation, Pregnancy or Special Testing on  a Variety of Body Fluids 


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    MLT 240LB - Urinalysis and Body Fluids Lab

    1.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the fundamental skills used for clinical lab techniques of urine and body fluids testing. Includes collection, physical and chemical examination, microscopic examination, body fluids, and individual fluids.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 240  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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    MLT 250 - Clinical Microbiology

    3.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    3.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the structure, identification, and control of bacteria. Includes discussion of categories and classification of bacteria, ecology and spread of bacteria, pathogenesis of bacterial infections, clinical bacteriology methodology, various organisms, clinically significant anaerobic bacteria, methods in antimicrobial testing, mycobacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, and local disease processes.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 250LB  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 250IN - Clinical Microbiology

    5 Credits, 9 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 6 lab periods

    Introduction to the structure, identification, and control of bacteria. Includes categories and classification of bacteria, ecology and spread of bacteria, pathogenesis of bacterial infections, clinical bacteriology methodology, various organisms, clinically significant anaerobic bacteria, methods in antimicrobial testing, mycobacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, and local disease processes.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN , and MAT 151  or assessment into MAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.   Identify proper growth requirements for bacterial organisms, their clinical significance and susceptibility to       antibiotics by interpreting smears, correlating specific microbiology test results with organisms and disease       states, and interpreting susceptibility procedural results.

    2.   Employ basic techniques used in bacteriology, including proper operation of the compound microscope,       aseptic handling of bacteriology specimens, preparation and staining bacteriological smears, selection of       proper media, and performance of susceptibility procedures.

    3.   Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and      participating in problem solving discussions.


    Outline:
    1. Introduction
      1. Role of the clinical microbiologist
      2. Factors impacting the current and future operation of the microbiology laboratory
      3. Basic bacteriology concepts
        1. Taxonomy
        2. Morphology
        3. Genetics
        4. Metabolism
      4. Host microorganism interactions
    2. Clinical Bacteriology Methodology
      1. Specimen collection, transport, and processing
      2. Direct smear preparation and microscopic examination
      3. Laboratory cultivation of bacteria
      4. Control of microorganisms
        1. Sterilization
        2. Disinfection
        3. Antisepsis
      5. Quality assurance in the clinical bacteriology laboratory
    3. Categories and Classification of Bacteria
    4. Ecology and Spread of Bacteria
    5. Pathogenesis of Bacterial Infections
    6. Catalase Positive Gram Positive Cocci
      1. Staphylococcus
      2. Micrococcus
    7. Catalase Negative Gram Positive Cocci
      1. Streptococcus
      2. Streptococcus-like bacteria
    8. Gram Negative Cocci
      1. Neisseria
      2. Moraxella
    9. Enterobacteriaceae
      1. Clinical significant tribes and genera
      2. Proteeae
      3. Salmonella
      4. Shigella
      5. Citrobactereae
      6. Eschericheae
      7. Klebsiellae
      8. Yersiniae
    10. Vibrionaceae
      1. Characteristics of the genus
      2. Vibrio cholerae
      3. Other vibrios
    11. Campylobacter and Related Taxa
      1. Enteric campylobacters
      2. Other clinically significant campylobacters
      3. Arcobacter, helicobacter, and flexispira
    12. Nonfermentative Gram Negative Bacilli
      1. Pseudomonads
      2. Acinetobacter
      3. Alcaligenes
    13. Hemophilus
    14. Miscellaneous Gram Negative Bacilli
      1. Gardnerella
      2. Legionella
      3. Bordetella
      4. Francisella
      5. Pasteurella
      6. Brucella
    15. Aerobic Gram Positive, Non-Sporeforming Bacilli
      1. Corynebacterium
      2. Listeria
      3. Lactobacilli
    16. Aerobic Spore-Forming Gram Positive Bacilli
      1. Bacillus anthrax
      2. Bacillus cereus
    17. Clinically Significant Anaerobic Bacteria
      1. Collection and transport of specimens
      2. Procedures for isolation and characterization of anaerobes
      3. Clostridium genus
      4. Anaerobic gram negative bacilli
      5. Anaerobic gram positive cocci
    18. Spirochetes
      1. Treponema
      2. Leptospira
      3. Borrelia
    19. Methods in Antimicrobial Testing
      1. Principles and procedures
      2. Quality control
      3. Major classes of antibiotics and their mode of action
      4. Safety precautions
    20. Mycobacteria
      1. Morphology and staining characteristics
      2. Pathogenic species
      3. Culture methods
    21. Viruses and Other Microorganisms
      1. Viruses (e.g. cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, influenza, varicella-zoster)
      2. Other microorganisms (e.g. chlamydia and mycoplasma)
    22. Local Disease Processes
      1. Urinary tract
      2. Normally sterile body fluids
      3. Respiratory tract
      4. Genital tract
      5. Skin, soft tissues, joints, bone
      6. Intestinal disease
      7. Central nervous system
      8. Eye


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    MLT 250LB - Clinical Microbiology Lab

    2.00 Credits, 6.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 6 lab periods

    Application and practice of techniques in the identification and control of bacteria. Includes structure, categories and classification of bacteria, ecology and spread of bacteria, pathogenesis of bacterial infections, clinical bacteriology methodology, various organisms, clinically significant anaerobic bacteria, antimicrobial testing, mycobacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, and local disease processes.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 250  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 265 - Parasitology and Immunology/Serology

    2.00 Credits, 2.00 Contact Hours
    2.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the basics of mycology and parasitology host relationships and their effects. Includes discussion of fungi, medical parasitology, specimen collection, techniques for examination, special techniques, other specimens, detection and diagnosis of parasitic infections, clinically important parasites, and immunology and serological testing.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN   and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 265LB  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.


  
  •  

    MLT 265IN - Parasitology and Immunology/Serology

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the basics of mycology and parasitology host relationships and their effects. Includes fungi, medical parasitology, specimen collection, techniques for examination, special techniques, other specimens, detection and diagnosis of parasitic infections, clinically important parasites, and immunology and serological testing.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  and MAT 151  or assessment into MAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.  Discuss performance and interpretation of selected serological tests.

    2.  Compare and contrast adaptive and innate immunity; immunogenicity; and the immune response in regard  to antibodies, antigens, complements, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and disease states, including autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, hypersensitivity, various viral and bacterial infections, and  transplant and tumor immunology.

    3.  Describe and interpret serologic tests including dilutions, titers, agglutination, precipitation, labeled and unlabeled immunoassays, molecular assays, and flow cytometry.

    4.  Identify and differentiate common pathogenic; opportunistic; and contaminating fungal elements, including growth requirements, key biochemical tests, and associated disease states.

    5.  Discuss the life cycle, hosts, infective and diagnostic states, morphology, pathology, and epidemiology of common parasitic agents.

    6.  Discuss specimen types, collection methods, specimen preservation and preparation, staining, and interfering substances when identifying fungal and parasitic organisms.

    7.  Perform (when available) and interpret serologic tests, including dilutions, titers, agglutination, precipitation, labeled and unlabeled immunoassays, molecular assays, and flow cytometry.

    8.  Apply concepts of adaptive and innate immunity; immunogenicity; and the immune response in regard to antibodies, antigens, complements, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and disease states, including       autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, hypersensitivity, various viral and bacterial infections, and transplant and tumor immunology to test methods and results.

    9.  Perform lactophenol cotton blue scotch tape and/or tease prep of several fungal isolates.

    10.  Identify parasites from multiple fixed slide specimens.

    11.  Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and participating in problem solving discussions.


    Outline:
    I.       Fungi Identification

             A.   Yeast

                   1.   Candida

                   2.   Cryptococcus

                   3.   Geotrichum

             B.   Dimorphic fungi

                   1.   Blastomyces

                   2.   Coccidiodes

                   3.   Histoplasma

                   4.   Sporothrix

             C.   Dermatophytes

                   1.   Epidermophyton

                   2,   Microsporum

                   3.   Trichophyton

             D.   Zygomycetes

                   1.   Absidia

                   2.   Mucor

                   3.   Rhizopus

             E.   Opportunistic molds/septate hyaline molds

                   1.   Aspergillus

                   2.   Penicillium

             F.   Specimen collection

             G.   Morphology and staining

    II.       Introduction to Medical Parasitology

             A.   Parasites, parasitism, and host relations

             B.   Pathogenesis of parasitic infections

    III.      Specimen Collection

    IV.     Techniques for Stool Examination

    V.      Special Techniques

    VI.     Use of Other Specimens

             A.   Cellophane type swabs

             B.   Genital specimens

             C.   Urine

             D.   Sputum

             E.   Aspirates and biopsies

             F.   Sigmoidoscopy

             G.   Abscess material

             H.   Muscle biopsy

    VII.    Detection and Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections

    VIII.    Clinically Important Parasites

             A.   Protozoa

                   1.   Amoeba

                   2.   Flagellates

                   3.   Sporozoa

                   4.   Ciliophora

             B.   Helminths

                   1.   Intestinal nematodes

                   2,   Tissue and blood nematodes

                   3.   Trematodes

                   4.   Cestodes

    IX.     Introduction to Immunology and Serological Testing

             A.   Immunology

             B.   Pre-analytical test principles

             C.   Specimen collection

             D.   Statistic and evaluation of test methods

    X.      Serological Testing

             A.   Autoimmunity

                   1.   Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)

                   2.   Thyroid antibodies

             B.   Infectious diseases

                   1.   Viral

                         a.   Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) / infectious mononucleosis

                         b.   Hepatitis

          c.   Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) / human t-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) / cytomegalovirus           (CMV)

                         d.   Rubella/measles

                         e.   Other viruses

                   2.   Microbial

                         a.   Cold agglutinins

                         b.   Syphilis

                         c.   Other microorganisms

             C.   Nucleic acid testing

                   1.   Western, southern blot testing

                   2.   Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

                   3.   Other tests

    XI.     Techniques for Stool Examination

    XII.    Detection and Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections

             A.   Special Techniques

             B.   Slide Review of Clinically Important Parasites

                   1.   Protozoa

                         a.   Amoeba

                         b.   Flagellates

                         c.   Sporozoa

                         d.   Ciliophora

                   2.   Helminths

                         a.   Intestinal nematodes

                         b.   Tissue and blood nematodes

                         c.   Trematodes

                         d.   Cestodes

    XIII.    Test Methods for Diagnosis

             A.   Immunology

             B.   Pre-analytical test principles

             C.   Specimen collection

             D.   Statistic and evaluation of test methods

    XIV.   Serological Testing – as available

             A.   Labeled and unlabeled immunoassays

             B.   Heterogeneous and homogeneous sandwich methods

                   1.   Cartridge testing

                   2.   Kit testing

             C.   Rapid plasma reagin (RPR)

             D.   Rheumatoid factor (RF)

             E.   Mono

    XV.    Serologic Dilutions


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    MLT 265LB - Parasitology and Immunology/Serology Lab

    1.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the basics of mycology and parasitology host relationships and their effects. Includes application and practice in medical parasitology, specimen collection, techniques for examination, special techniques, detection and diagnosis of parasitic infections, identification of clinically important parasites, and immunology and serological testing.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN   and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 265  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 275 - Hematology

    4.00 Credits, 4.00 Contact Hours
    4.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    The study of red cells, white cells, and platelets looking at structure, formation, and the diseases associated with these cells. Includes discussion of types of blood cells, normal and abnormal blood cells, maturation, disease states, hemoglobins, hemoglobinopathies, hemostasis, coagulation, fibrinolytic system, instrumentation, and quality controls and assurance.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 275LB  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 275IN - Hematology

    5 Credits, 7 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    The study of red cells, white cells, and platelets looking at structure, formation, and the diseases associated with these cells. Includes types of blood cells, tests, normal and abnormal blood cells, maturation, disease states, hemoglobins, hemoglobinopathies, hemostasis, coagulation, fibrinolytic system, instrumentation, and quality controls and assurance.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN , and MAT 151  or assessment in MAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.  Correlate test results with known values (normal 5-10%, abn. 10-20%), inclusions and abnormalities of white   blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) with associated clinical conditions and disease states.

    2.  Discuss RBC and the differences in hemoglobins including clinical significance, electrophoresis results, and red cell indices.

    3.  Describe fibrinolytic and coagulation mechanisms, associated laboratory tests (including normal and abnormal findings) and relate these to specific disorders and therapies.

    4.  Perform white blood cells (WBC) differentials in various stages of maturation, correlating results with known values (normal 5-10%, abn. 10-20%), inclusions and abnormalities of WBC and red blood cells (RBC) with associated clinical conditions and disease states.

    5.  Perform red cell indices calculations from patient complete blood count (CBC) results as well as interpret other hematology test results, including hemoglobin electrophoresis and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) results.

    6.  Perform and interpret the results (including normal and abnormal findings) of fibrinolytic and coagulation laboratory tests, including prothrombin time (PT/INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT).

    7.  Perform automated blood count and coagulation analysis, including application of Westgard Rules, instrument maintenance, quality control, and reporting of results.

    8.  Improve critical thinking and organizations skills by attending class, completing lab assignments, and participate in classroom laboratory activities


    Outline:
    I.       Types of Blood Cells

             A.   Red - Erythrocytic maturation

             B.   White

                   1.   Normal white cells in peripheral blood

                         a.   Neutrophils

                         b.   Lymphocytes

                         c.   Monocytes

                         d.   Eosinophils

                         e.   Basophils

                   2.   Leukocytic maturation

             C.   Platelets - Thrombocytic maturation

    II.       Associated Hematology Lab Tests

             A.   Normal values

             B.   Abnormal values

             C.   Associated clinical conditions

             D.   Associated disease states

    III.      Normal and Abnormal Red Blood Cells and White Blood Cells

             A.   Characteristics used to differentiate between types of blood cells

             B.   Inclusions and abnormalities of blood cells and associated clinical conditions and disease states

    IV.     Disease States

             A.   Anemias resulting from decreased cell production

             B.   Hemolytic anemias

             C.   Anemias secondary to blood loss

             D.   Inflammation and infection

             E.   Non-malignant WBC disorders of the white cells

             F.   Malignant disorders

    V.      Hemoglobins

             A.   A

             B.   A2

             C.   F

             D.   S

             E.   C

             F.   D

             G.   Oxyhemoglobin

             H.   Carboxyhemoglobin

             I.    Methemoglobin

             J.   Sulfhemoglobin

    VI.     Hemoglobinopathies

             A.   Sickle cell

             B.   Hemoglobin C

             C.   Hemoglobin SC

             D.   Hemoglobin E

             E.   Thalassemia

    VII.    Facets of Hemostasis

             A.   Coagulation mechanisms and abnormalities

             B.   Fibrinolytic system

    VIII.    Tests

             A.   Hemoglobin and hematocrit

             B.   Complete blood count (CBC) - indices calculations

             C.   Differential

             D.   Reticulocyte count

             E.   Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)

             F.   Hemoglobin electrophoresis

             G.   Prothrombin time (PT)/NR

             H.   Activated partial thromboplastic time (aPTT)

             I.    D-dimer

             J.   Thrombin time (TT)

             K.   Dilute Russell viper venom (DRVV)

    IX.     Normal White Cells in Peripheral Blood

             A.   Neutrophils

             B.   Lymphocytes

             C.   Monocytes

             D.   Eosinophils

             E.   Basophils

    X.      Normal and Abnormal White Blood Cells

             A.   Size

             B.   Shape

             C.   Coloration

             D.   Nuclear cytoplasm ratio

             E,   Chromatin

             F.   Leukocytic maturation

    XI.     Normal and Abnormal Red Blood Cells

             A.   Size

             B.   Shape

             C.   Coloration

             D.   Distribution

             E.   Inclusion bodies

             F.   Erythrocytic maturation

    XII.    Instrumentation

             A.   Hematology instruments: CBC analyzer, coagulation analyzer, point of care instruments

             B.   Patient sample acquisition on various hematology analyzers

             C.   Maintenance of hematology analyzers

             D.   Troubleshooting techniques

             E.   Theory and methodology of hematology analyzers

    XIII.    Westgard Rules

             A.   Theory and application toward sample data

             B.   Identify trends and shifts

             C.   Troubleshooting techniques

    XIV.   Quality Controls and Quality Assurance


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    MLT 275LB - Hematology Lab

    1.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    The study and testing of red cells, white cells, and platelets looking at structure, formation, and the diseases associated with these cells. Includes types of blood cells, tests, normal and abnormal blood cells, maturation, disease states, hemoglobins, hemoglobinopathies, hemostasis, coagulation, fibrinolytic system, instrumentation, and quality controls and assurance.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment in MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 275  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 285 - Clinical Chemistry

    3.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    3.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Theoretical application of fundamentals of chemistry in a clinical setting. Includes discussion of chemical substances, instruments, laboratory procedures, blood and urine chemistry abnormalities, and laboratory instrument computers and information systems.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 285LB  
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.


  
  •  

    MLT 285IN - Clinical Chemistry

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Fundamentals of chemistry including theoretical application and performance in a clinical setting. Includes chemical substances, instruments, laboratory procedures, blood and urine chemistry abnormalities, and laboratory instrument computers and information systems.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN , and MAT 151  or assessment into MAT 189 .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program and obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. IN is the integrated version of the course with the lecture and lab taught simultaneously.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.  Define metabolic pathways basic to the physiology of the human body.

    2.  Describe the general principles of electrophoresis and its role in disease diagnosis.

    3.  State the theory behind commonly performed laboratory procedures and correlate results with disease states and clinical significance for a variety of biochemical substances such as electrolytes, enzymes, tumor markers, and pharmaceuticals.

    4.  State the basic statistical calculations to analyze quality control data, and to determine reliability of clinical chemistry assays in the chemistry laboratory (Westgard Rules).

    5.  Differentiate between and describe the interface between laboratory instrument computers and the laboratory information system. 

    6.  Explain how to perform dilutions, titers, conversions, and other mathematical calculations for chemistry.

    7.  Operate and maintain standardized procedures for chemistry instrumentation.

    8.  Perform common laboratory procedures and correlate results with disease states and clinical significance for a variety of biochemical substances such as electrolytes, enzymes, tumor markers, and      pharmaceuticals.

    9.  Apply basic statistical calculations to analyze quality control data, and to determine reliability of clinical  chemistry assays in the chemistry laboratory (Westgard Rules); and perform standardized procedures for chemistry using basic instrumentation, including electrophoresis, enzymatic spectrophotometry, and other analytical methods.

    10.  Perform dilutions, titers, conversions, and other mathematical calculations for chemistry.

    11.  Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and participating in problem solving discussions


    Outline:
    I.       Chemical Substances and Correlation to Abnormalities or Disease States 

    II.       Laboratory Instrumentation, Validation, Quality Control, Troubleshooting, and Reagents

    III.      Requirements for and Preparation of Laboratory Procedures Reports

             A.   Principles of the procedure

             B.   Function of each reagent used

             C.   Clinical significance of the test

             D.   Results

             E.   Conclusions

    IV.     Criteria for Evaluation of Results of Blood and Urine Samples and Correlation to Disease States

             A.   Altered acid base balance

             B.   Kidney disease

             C.   Liver disease

             D.   Heart disease

             E.   Neurological system disorders

             F.   Endocrine and reproductive system disorders

             G.   Bone and muscle disease

             H.   Neoplasms

             I.    Nutritional status

             J.   Fetal abnormalities

             K.   Pediatrics and geriatrics

             L.   Therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse

    V.      Requirements for Instrument Computers and Laboratory Information Systems

    VI.     Calculation of Lab Math Values

             A.   Molar solutions

             B.   Unit conversions

             C.   Dilutions

             D.   Serial dilutions

             E.   Molarity and normality

             F.   pH

    VII.    Measurement of Chemical Substances and Ions

             A.   Na

             B.   K

             C.   Cl

             D.   Glucose

             E.   Blood urea nitrogen (BUN)

             F.   Creatinine

             G.   Proteins and amino acids

             H.   Uric acid

             I.    Alkaline phosphatase

             J.   Electrolytes

             K.   Cardiac markers

             L.   Blood gases

             M.  Enzymes

             N.   Bilirubin

             O.   Hormones

             P.   Minerals

             Q.   Lipids

    VIII.    Quality Control / Statistics

             A.   Westgard Rules

             B.   Accuracy

             C.   Precision

             D.   Mean

             E.   Calibration Curve

             F.   Standard Deviation

             G.   Calibrators

             H.   Standards

             I.    Controls

             J.   Reagent stability

    IX.     Operation and Evaluation of Instrumentation

             A.   Troubleshooting

             B.   Instrument maintenance

             C.   Method validation

             D.   Analytical measurement range (AMR)

             E.   Lot to lot variation

    X.      Use of Chemistry Instrumentation to Obtain Accurate Results

             A.   Glassware

             B.   Transfer pipettes

             C.   Volumetric pipettes

             D.   Spectrophotometry

             E.   Chemiluminescence

             F.   Spectrophotometers

             G.   On board dilutors

             H    Electrophoresis equipment

             I.    Pointe 180 (Westgard Rules)

             J.   Centrifuge

             K.   Balances

             L.   Chromatography

    XI.     Interpretation and Correlation of Blood and Urine Chemistry Abnormalities

             A.   Metabolic acidosis/alkalosis

             B.   Respiratory acidosis/alkalosis

             C.   Creatinine clearance

             D.   Calcium homeostasis

             E.   Liver disease

             F.   Heart disease

             G.   Neurological system disorders

             H.   Endocrine and reproductive system disorders

             I.    Neoplasms

             J.   Nutritional status

             K.   Fetal abnormalities

             L.   Pediatrics and geriatrics

             M.  Therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    MLT 285LB - Clinical Chemistry Lab

    1.00 Credits, 3.00 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Perform fundamentals of chemistry in a clinical setting. Includes chemical substances, instruments, laboratory procedures, blood and urine chemistry abnormalities, and laboratory instrument computers and information systems.

    Prerequisite(s): With a grade of B or better: BIO 205IN  , and MAT 151   or assessment into MAT 189  .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 285  .
    Information: Students must be admitted to the Medical Laboratory Technician program or obtain consent of instructor before enrolling in this course.
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  •  

    MLT 299 - Advanced Co-op: Medical Laboratory Technician

    6.5 Credits, 6.5 Contact Hours
    6.5 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Comprehensive review of course work to prepare the student for national certifying examinations, provide a forum for discussion of current issues and technologies in clinical laboratory science, and augment the concurrent clinical experience. Students share their experience in the clinical area through discussion of topics of interest and presentation of case studies.

    Prerequisite(s): MLT 100IN  (or MLT 100  and MLT 100LB ), MLT 240IN , MLT 275IN , MLT 285IN , MLT 250IN , and MLT 265IN .
    Corequisite(s): MLT 299WK  
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. This is the capstone course for the MLT program.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Meet with coordinator and cohort to discuss rotation, and present departmental review for ASCP medical laboratory technician exam preparation.
    2. Evaluate readiness for the national certifying examinations through mock exam testing.  
    3. Discuss the importance of team building, and career advancement including opportunities for continuing education after graduation.

    Outline:
    1. Principles, Theories, and Practices in Clinical Laboratory
      1. Application in the work situation
      2. Understanding through application
    2. Program Review of Student Performance
      1. Study question-submitted electronically
      2. Department examinations completed at the West Campus testing center
      3. Complete weekly assignments for each department
    3. Clinical Laboratory Discussion
      1. Case study presentations
      2. New technology and automation
      3. Planning for quality
      4. Challenges in the work setting
    4. Strategies for Successful Board Examination
      1. Test taking skills
      2. Review materials
      3. Mock registry exams
    5. Continuing Education After Graduation


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    MLT 299WK - Advanced Co-op Work: Medical Laboratory Technician

    7.5 Credits, 22.5 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 22.5 lab periods

    A supervised cooperative work program for students in an occupation related area. Teacher-coordinators work with students and their supervisors in a hospital or clinic laboratory. The student develops competency and improved self confidence in the laboratory workplace.

    Prerequisite(s): MLT 100IN  (or MLT 100  and MLT 100LB ), MLT 240IN , MLT 275IN , MLT 285IN , MLT 230IN , MLT 250IN , and MLT 265IN  
    Corequisite(s): MLT 299  
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. Students complete a minimum of 338 clock hours of supervised placement at approved work site.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply the basic principles, knowledge, and skills learned in the classroom to evaluate and interpret laboratory test results for accuracy and efficiency. 
    2. Complete a clinical rotation at an assigned CLIA licensed laboratory facility for a minimum of 338 hours in hematology, coagulation, chemistry, urinalysis, body fluids, microbiology, serology, and blood bank/transfusion medicine.
    3. Improve critical thinking and organizational skills by attending class, completing assignments, and participating in problem-solving discussions.

    Outline:
    1. Assigned Clinical Rotation Site
      1. Expectations
        1. A minimum of 338 hours experiencing:
          1. Hematology
          2. Coagulation
          3. Chemistry
          4. Urinalysis
          5. Body fluids
          6. Microbiology
          7. Serology
          8. Blood bank/transfusion medicine
          9. Review Progress
      2. Job-site supervisor review of performance, Preceptor evaluation of student
        1. Hours completed
        2. Evaluate, perform, and interpret laboratory test and results
        3. Review completion of student’s objectives/activities
      3. Student evaluation of clinical rotation experience


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19