Jan 23, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Legend for Courses

HC/HN: Honors Course  IN/IH: Integrated lecture/lab  LB: Lab  LC: Clinical Lab  LS: Skills Lab  WK: Co-op Work
SUN#: is a prefix and number assigned to certain courses that represent course equivalency at all Arizona community colleges and the three public universities. Learn more at www.aztransfer.com/sun.

 

Art

  
  •  

    ART 100 - Basic Design

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the elements and principles of visual design. Includes identifying and interpreting creative problems; emphasizing art and design skills; writing reviews of gallery visits/museum visits/artist lecturers; articulating and demonstrating progressive skills in their own work; participating in individual and group critiques; and relating their work on a conceptual, interpersonal and global level.

    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA; Meets CTE - A&H.




    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate basic creative use of formal art and design elements and principles.
    2. Demonstrate basic use of a variety of art materials, techniques and processes as applied to creative practices and expression.
    3. Demonstrate proper use of basic design vocabulary from various historical, aesthetic and cultural perspectives.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Demonstrate creative use of the art elements of line, shape, space, value, texture, volume, and color.
    2. Demonstrate creative use of the art principles of harmony, variety, balance, tension, rhythm, proportion, repetition, and contrast.
    3. Demonstrate skill development in the basic art areas of drawing, painting, introductory color, collage, and sculpture materials.
    4. Discuss art appreciation from a formal and historical perspective.
    5. Demonstrate observational, descriptive, analytical, and interpretive skills.
    6. Utilize appropriate design vocabulary and articulate aesthetic and cultural connections.

    Outline:
    1. Creative Problems: Art Elements, Principles, and Their Presentation
      1. Identify the elements and principles  
        1. Their own work
        2. The work of their peers
        3. The environment
        4. Established contemporary and historical artists
      2. Interpret the elements and principles 
        1. Their own work
        2. The work of their peers
        3. The environment
        4. Established contemporary and historical artists
    2. Emphasizing Art and Design Skills
      1. Lectures
      2. Demonstrations
      3. Activities
    3. Written Reviews of Gallery Visits/Museum Visits/Artist Lecturers
    4. Articulate and Demonstrate Progressive Skills in Their Own Work
      1. Observational
      2. Descriptive
      3. Analytical
      4. Interpretive
    5. Individual and Group Critiques
      1. Utilization of design vocabulary
      2. Aesthetic issues
      3. Cultural issues


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 103 - 3D Digital Fabrication and Printing

    1.00 Credits, 1.50 Contact Hours
    .50 lecture periods 1 lab period

    Introduction to 3D digital fabrication techniques.  Includes fabrication software and equipment safety, and individualized projects.

    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of two credit hours.  If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the use of digital fabrication software and safe operation of equipment.
    2. Create an individualized project using digital fabrication techniques.

    Outline:
    I. 3D Fabrication Software and Equipment Safety

    1. Scanner software
    2. 3D modeling software
    3. Laser cutter/engraver software

    II. Individualized Project Possibilities

    1. Non-representational form
    2. Abstraction
    3. Kinetic
    4. Functional object       


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 105 - Exploring Art and Visual Culture G

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Exploration of historical and contemporary art and the visual image within the context of global culture. Includes selective perception, formal analysis, materials and techniques, art and visual culture in a historical and contemporary framework; and museum, galleries, and public spaces.

    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA and G; Meets CTE - A&H or SBS and G.




    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe art and visual culture as it relates to global, historical, and contemporary artistic concepts, themes, and the individual.
    2. Evaluate art from the aspect of aesthetic theory and awareness of selective and cultural perception.
    3. Apply the formal elements and principles of art utilizing processes, techniques, and media in producing art.
    4. Differentiate and analyze the historical and contemporary context of art in global visual culture using current issues and concepts.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to draw meaningful conclusions from experiencing art in museums, galleries and/or public spaces.

    Outline:
    1. Selective Perception and Looking at Art and Culture
      1. Defining selective perception
      2. Skills used in looking and interpreting art
        1. Perceptual
        2. Cognitive
        3. Others
      3. Defining and analyzing global visual culture
      4. Science, technology, and alternative media
      5. Fashion
      6. Design as a cross-cultural visual medium
      7. Advertising
      8. Film, video, and digital art  
      9. Critical methodologies used in interpreting art
      10. Social functions of art and visual culture in a global context
      11. Valuing visual images and visual spaces
      12. Categorizations of art and global popular culture
      13. Spirituality and the Sacred (Africa, Asia, Europe, Islamic World, Latin America, Pacific Islands, Native America, United States)
      14. Power and politics (propaganda art, degenerate art, censorship)
      15. Time and place
      16. Identity (race, gender, biographical)
      17. The body (concepts of beauty, feminist art, body art)
    2. Formal Analysis
      1. Elements of art
      2. Principles of art
      3. Elements and principles in global culture
    3. Materials and Techniques
      1. Two-dimensional media
      2. Three-dimensional media
      3. Alternative media and processes
      4. Architecture
      5. Creating visual projects
        1. Two dimensional and/or
        2. Three dimensional
      6. Apply formal analysis concepts to visual images
      7. Apply contextualized thinking processes in making visual images
      8. Reflect on and evaluate process and final product of the creative experience
    4. Art and Visual Culture in a Historical and Contemporary Framework
      1. Exemplars of global art from prehistory through contemporary culture
    1. Painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, film
    2. Sculpture, installations, performance art
    3. Architecture and urban design
    4. Crafts
      1. Exemplars of globally diverse cultures
        1. Painting, drawing, printmaking, photography
        2. Sculpture, installations
        3. Architecture and urban design
        4. Crafts
      2. Issues of categorization
        1. Categorizations of art
        2. Categorizations of popular visual culture
      3. Funding of the arts (patrons, state, church, the art market)
      4. Globalization and social conscience
      5. Appropriation/commodification
    5. Museums, Galleries, and Public Spaces
      1. History of art museums
      2. Roles of the art museum in an aesthetic, cultural, and global content
      3. Galleries
      4. Public art and art in public places


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020
  
  •  

    ART 106 - Survey of Painting Materials and Techniques

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Technical, theoretical, and historical investigation of painting methods in art, from ancient times to contemporary times. Includes materials used in painting; watercolor, fresco, and encaustic techniques; the glair technique, egg tempera technique, the indirect oil technique, the direct oil technique, the acrylic technique, and socio-economic conditions and contemporary issues.

    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA; Meets CTE - A&H.





    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe and demonstrate the use of basic painting materials such as pigment, brushes, palette, palette knife, medium, solvents, supports as well as basic safety in the studio.
    2. Describe the materials methods and use of the Encaustic Watercolor, and Fresco Techniques and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in ancient Egypt, Greece, Tome, and non-Western cultures.
    3. Demonstrate and describe the materials and method used in the Glair technique and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the Byzantine Era and the early Middle Ages, as well as its use in non-Western cultures.
    4. Demonstrate and describe the materials and method used in the Egg Tempera Technique and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the High Middle Ages, as well as its use in non-Western cultures.
    5. Demonstrate and describe the materials and method used in the Indirect Oil Technique and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the Renaissance, as well as its use in non-Western cultures.
    6. Demonstrate and describe the materials and method used in the Direct Oil Technique and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the 1800’s in Europe and the United States, as well as its use in non-Western cultures.
    7. Demonstrate and describe the materials and method used in the Acrylic Technique and the historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the 1940’s in the United States, as well as its use in non-Western cultures.
    8. Describe the global Modern and Contemporary use of Fresco, Encaustic, Glair, Egg Tempera, the Indirect and Direct Oil, Acrylic, and Watercolor techniques.

    Outline:
    1. Materials Used in Painting
      1. Pigments
      2. Medium
      3. Brushes
      4. Palette and palette knife
      5. Solvent
      6. Support
      7. Basic safety in the painting studio

     

     

    1. The Watercolor, Fresco, and Encaustic Techniques
      1. Materials used for Encaustic technique
      2. Materials used in the Fresco technique
      3. Materials used in the Watercolor technique
      4. Historic political and economic systems and events that affected the living and working conditions of  the artist in Ancient Egypt
        1. Political system and events of Ancient Egypt and its impact in art
        2. Religion in Ancient Egypt and its impact in art
        3. Economy, war, and trade in Ancient Egypt and its impact in art
        4. The artist, education, and livelihood in Ancient Egypt
    2. Historic political and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in  Ancient Greece and Rome
      1. Political system and events of the Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and their impact in art
      2. Religion in Ancient Greece and Tome and its impact in art
      3. Economy, war, and trade in Ancient Greece and Tome and its impact in art
      4. The artist, education, and livelihood in Ancient Greece and Rome
    3. Use of Encaustic, Watercolor, and Fresco in non-Western cultures
    4. Steps in the creation of a Watercolor painting
    5. Steps in the creation of a Encaustic painting
    6. Steps in the creation of a Fresco Secco and a Buon Fresco painting
    7. Research and selection of the model
    8. Preparation of under-drawing
    9. Demonstration of the Watercolor technique
    10. Preparation of Watercolor paint
    11. Painting of the reproduction
    12. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    13. Global use of Watercolor, Encaustic, and Fresco by modern and contemporary artists
    14. The Glair Technique
      1. Historic political and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the Byzantine Era and Early Middle Ages
        1. Political systems of the Byzantine Era and the Early Middle Ages and their impact in art
        2. Religion in the Byzantine Era and the Early Middle Ages and its impact in art
        3. Economy, war, and trade in the Byzantine Era and the Early Middle Ages and its impact in art
        4. The artist, education, and livelihood in the Byzantine Era and the Early Middle Ages
    15. Use of Glair technique in non-Western cultures
    16. Materials used, research, and selection of the model
    17. Preparation of ground and under-drawing
    18. Demonstration of Glair technique
    19. Preparation of Glair
    20. Painting of the reproduction
    21. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    22. Global use of Glair technique and illuminations by modern and contemporary artists
    23. Egg Tempera Technique
      1. Historical political and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the High Middle Ages
        1. Political systems of the High Middle Ages and their impact in art
        2. Religion in the High Middle Ages and its impact in art
        3. Economy, war, and trade in the High Middle Ages and its impact in art
        4. The artist, education, and livelihood in the High Middle Ages
    24. The Use of the Egg Tempera technique in non-Western cultures
    25. Materials used, research, and selection of the model
    26. Preparation of ground, gesso on wood panel
    27. Under-drawing
    28. Verdaccio
    29. Demonstration of Egg Tempera technique
    30. Preparation of Egg Tempera
    31. Painting of the reproduction
    32. Gold leaf application
    33. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    34. Global use of the Egg Tempera technique by modern and contemporary artists
    35. The Indirect Oil Technique
      1. Historic political and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in  the Renaissance
        1. Political systems of the Renaissance and their impact in art
        2. Religion in the Renaissance and its impact in art
        3. Economy, war, and trade in the Renaissance and its impact in art
        4. The artist, education, and livelihood in the Renaissance
    36. Use of the Indirect Oil technique in non-Western cultures
    37. Material used, research, and selection of the model
    38. Preparation of ground, stretching, and gesso of cotton canvas
    39. Under-drawing
    40. Grisaille
    41. Demonstration of glaze and scumbling
    42. Preparation of paint
    43. Painting of the reproduction
    44. Varnishing
    45. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    46. Global use of the Indirect technique by modern and contemporary artists
    47. The Direct Oil Technique (Allaprima)
      1. Historic, political, and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the 1800’s in Europe and the United States, including cultural non-Western influences
        1. Political systems of the 1800’s in Europe and the United States and their impact in art
        2. Economy, war, and trade in the 1800’s in Europe, United States, Asia, and Africa and its impact in art
        3. The artist, education, and livelihood in the 1800’s in Europe and United States
    48. Use of the Alla Prima technique in non-Western cultures
    49. Materials used, research, and selection of the model
    50. Preparation of ground
    51. Demonstration of the direct method  
    52. Preparation of paint
    53. Painting of the reproduction
    54. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    55. Global use of Allaprima technique by modern and contemporary artists
    56. The Acrylic Technique
      1. Historic political and economic systems that affected the living and working conditions of the artist in the 1940’s in the United States
        1. Political system of the 1940’s in the United States and its impact in art
        2. Economy, war, and trade in the 1940’s in the United States and its impact in art
        3. The artist, education, and livelihood in the 1940’s United States
    57. Use of the Acrylic technique in non-Western cultures
    58. Materials used, research, and selection of the model
    59. Preparation of ground
    60. Preparation of paint
    61. Painting of the reproduction
    62. Terminology related to formal analysis, iconography, style, and contemporary global issues in art
    63. Global use of the Acrylic technique by modern and contemporary artists
    64. Socio-Economic Conditions and Contemporary Issues
      1. Geographical influences
      2. Social values
      3. Religious values
      4. Political values
      5. Economic values
      6. Access to training and education
      7. Women in art
      8. Access to materials
      9. Patronage
      10. Migrations
      11. Syncretism
      12. Global influences
      13. Global discoveries that impacted the development of materials and techniques
        1. Discovery of natural gums and solvents
        2. Creation of paper: from skin to books
        3. The chemical bonds of fresco, egg white, and egg yolk
        4. Linear and aerial perspective
        5. Camera obscura
        6. Ancient pigments, sources, and manufacturing
        7. Modern pigments, sourcing, and manufacturing
        8. Rendering devices
        9. The tube
        10. Optical discoveries and devices
        11. The discovery of plastic


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020

  
  •  

    ART 109 - Watercolor Painting

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introductory course in watercolor painting that explores basic materials, techniques, and development of students’ personal style. Includes compositional elements, materials and tools, mixing colors and properties of watercolor pigments, application methods, developing subject matter and genres, and critique and artistic development.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Develop compositional elements in watercolor, which includes formal pictorial organization.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to use a variety of watercolor materials, pigments, brushes, and their specific uses.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to mix colors and create complex colors.
    4. Identify properties of watercolor application.
    5. Demonstrate artistic development by using observational and/or photographic resources in different genres: still-life, landscape, and portrait.
    6. Participate in individual and group critiques and explore and develop personal direction.

    Outline:
    1. Compositional Elements
      1. Line, shape, texture, color
      2. Linear perspective and atmospheric space
      3. Balance, emphasis, and focal points
    2. Materials and Tools
      1. Papers
    1. Hot press
    2. Cold press
    3. Rough
      1. Brushes
    1. Natural and nylons
    2. Mops, sables, ox-hair
    3. Sponges
    4. Newly developed materials
      1. Mixing Colors and Properties of Watercolor Pigments
        1. Hydrate cake paint
        2. Mixing: primary, secondary, tertiary, triads and tetrads
        3. Transparency/opacity
        4. Staining/sediment
      2. Watercolor Application Methods
        1. Washes
    1. Graduated
    2. Flat
    3. Variegated
      1. Wet-into-wet
    1. Dropped in pigment
    2. Edges
    3. Retouching
      1. Textures
    1. Natural
    2. Man-made
      1. Dry brush
      2. Stippling
      3. Glazing
      4. Masking
    1. Tape
    2. Liquid frisket
      1. Developing Subject Matter and Genres
        1. Observational based procedures
        2. Photographic resources
        3. Prepare pre-paint sketches
      2. Critique and Artistic Development
        1. Incorporate critical thinking in creative process
        2. Observe, examine, and discover to create personal direction


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2014
  
  •  

    ART 110 - Drawing I [SUN# ART 1111]

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to drawing. Includes drawing and design problems, varied use of materials and techniques, perceptual skills, critique processes with critical thinking for personal growth, analysis of professional art events or galleries, and portfolio creation.

    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA; Meets CTE - A&H.


      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explore and apply utilization of elements and principles of design to still-life, nature studies and figure drawing, and dealing contextually with contemporary issues.
    2. Explore and apply diverse drawing media, techniques, and observational skills to various subjects: still life, nature studies, figure drawing, and personal and cultural iconography.
    3. Discuss problems and demonstrate the processes of seeing and communicating visual ideas using drawing media.
    4. Evaluate and analyze work of self and others utilizing critical thinking and appropriate terminology through oral and written critique processes.
    5. Observe and critique professional art events or gallery exhibitions via online and/or at local venues.
    6. Produce a portfolio of representational drawing of various subjects from observation and imagination.

    Outline:
    1. Drawing and Design Problems
    1. Line
    2. Figure-ground relationships
    3. Value
    4. Texture
    5. Volume
    6. Contrast
    7. Space
    8. Composition
    9. Expressive and contextual invention
    1. Varied Use of Materials and Techniques
    1. Materials
    1. Dry media
    2. Wet media
    3. Mixed media
    1. Drawing methods and techniques
    1. Mark making
    2. Measurement strategies and the view finder
    3. Triangulation
    4. Linear perspective and atmospheric perspective
    5. Modeling
    1. Employ media and techniques to various subjects
    1. Traditional genre: still-life, figure, and landscape, etc.
    2. Non-traditional genre and experimentation with media/techniques/subjects
    1. Perceptual Skill and Personal Development
    1. Demonstrate and apply basic observational skills, aerial, and linear perspective properties
    2. Explore drawing as a way of demonstrating basic diagrammatic and/or mapping communication
    1. Critique Process
    1. Participate in individual and group critiques using basic perceptual observations and visual terminology
    2. Utilize analytical skills through critical thinking to develop personal expression
    1. Engagement in and Analysis of Professional Art Events or Galleries
    1. Visit online or local and/or regional galleries, art events, and/or museums
    2. Complete written analysis per instructor guidelines
    3. Address contemporary professional works and/or historical works
    1. Portfolio Creation
    1. Complete series of drawings
    2. Select drawings for portfolio
    3. Presentation of selected drawings


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 115 - Color and Composition

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to recognizing color principles and relationships and analyzing and duplicating colors. Includes values scale, color wheel, intensity, color relationships, transparency, dimension, luminosity, and creative projects.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA; Meets CTE - A&H.


      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Analyze the composition of a color according to its hue, value, and intensity.
    2. Analyze color relationships.
    3. Reproduce any color with pigments.
    4. Create the illusions of dimension, light, and transparency with color.
    5. Use a variety of mediums.

    Outline:
    1. Value Scale
    2. Color Wheel
    3. Intensity Exercise
    4. Joseph Albers or Other Color Relationship Exercises
    5. Transparency Exercise
    6. Dimension Exercise
    7. Luminosity Exercise
    8. Major Creative Project that Shows Movement with Color and/or Explores Transparency, Dimension, and/or Luminosity
    9. Major Creative Project Involving the Analysis and Duplication of Colors


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 120 - 3D Design [SUN# ART 1115]

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to three-dimensional design. Includes concepts and approaches to three-dimensional design, critical analysis, 3D design elements and principles, exploration of a range of media and techniques, and basic sculptural design lab procedures.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - FA; Meets CTE - A&H.


      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Create content utilizing three-dimensional art concepts.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze, write about, and discuss three-dimensional art.
    3. Utilize three-dimensional art elements and organizing principles.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to use a range of three-dimensional media and techniques.
    5. Demonstrate proper basic sculptural lab safety and equipment procedures.

    Outline:
    1. Concepts and Approaches to Three-Dimensional Design
    1. Non-objective design
    2. Realism
    3. Abstraction
    4. Ready-made/context manipulation
    5. Site specific/public art
    1. Critical Analysis
    1. Group critiques
    2. Individual project self-reflections
    3. Written critique essay
    1. 3D Elements and Principles
    1. Elements
    1. Space
    2. Volume/form
    3. Texture
    4. Line
    5. Color
    6. Light
    7. Time/duration
    8. Contest
    1. Principles
    1. Repetition
    2. Variation
    3. Rhythm
    4. Balance
    5. Focal point
    6. Unity
    7. Scale/proportion
    1. Exploration of a Range of Media and Techniques
    1. Media
    1. Clay
    2. Wood
    3. Plaster
    4. Metal
    5. Others
    1. Techniques
    1. Addition (build up)
    2. Subtraction (carving)
    3. Substitution (casting)
    4. Selection (context manipulation)
    1. Basic Sculptural Design Lab Procedures
    1. Health and safety issues/use of personal protective equipment
    2. Lab waste disposal procedures
    3. Responsible cooperative shared lab use
    4. Proper use of tools and equipment
    1. Hand tools
    2. Power tools
    3. Others


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020
  
  •  

    ART 121 - Figure Sculpture

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Beginning modeling techniques using clay and other media working partly from anatomical references and partly from the model. Includes visual literacy and critical analysis, range of media, approaches to figurative sculpture, technical understanding in working with human anatomy, content, and safety.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 120  and ART 213  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: There may be additional supply costs in addition to course fees.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze, write about, and discuss figurative sculpture.
    2. Demonstrate skills working in clay and other media such as wax and plaster, in the sculpture of the human figure.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to use various approaches to the figure, including realism, abstraction and current trends. 
    4. Demonstrate the ability to properly sculpt basic human anatomy.
    5. Develop and discuss concepts concerning content issues in figurative sculpture.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to use equipment safely and properly.

    Outline:
    1. Visual Literacy and Critical Analysis
      1. Individual and group critiques
      2. Visits to galleries and written review of exhibitions
      3. Lecture and visual presentations
        1. Historical sculpture
        2. Contemporary figurative sculpture
    2. Explore a Range of Media
      1. Wax
      2. Plaster
      3. Clay
      4. Other
    3. Approaches to Figurative Sculpture
      1. Realism
      2. Abstraction
      3. Current trends
    4. Technical Understanding in Working with Human Anatomy
      1. Skeletal structure
      2. Muscular structure
      3. Detail studies (head, hands, etc.)
    5. Content
      1. Past and contemporary figurative sculptors
      2. Issues in figurative sculpting
      3. Individual approach
    6. Safety
      1. Use of sculpture lab safety equipment
      2. Use of safety gear for material handling


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    ART 123 - Sculpture: Metal Casting

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to metal casting of sculpture with emphasis on the lost wax method, historical and contemporary issues in cast sculpture, and individual artistic exploration. Includes content development, major techniques, health and safety issues, and visual literacy and critical analysis.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate development of content through exploration of sculptural casting.
    2. Demonstrate development of skills in using metal casting and finishing techniques. 
    3. Demonstrate safe work practices and the ability to use equipment safely and properly.
    4. Demonstrate visual literacy and critical analysis skills.

    Outline:
    1. Content Development
    1. Realistic approaches, including use of the human figure in sculpture
    2. Abstraction
    3. Non-objective design
    4. Installation
    5. Interactive
    1. Major Techniques Covered
    1. Wax working–direct and mold making processes
    2. Spruing the wax: pattern design and attachment of sprues, vents, and gates to facilitate wax elimination and metal flow
    3. Investing the wax to create the mold using ceramic shell
    4. Wax burnout of the mold
    5. Melting and casting of metal into the molds
    6. Removal of investment
    7. Removal of sprues, vents, and gates
    8. Chasing and finishing the bronze or aluminum casting
    9. Polishing and applying chemical patinas

    III.   Health and Safety Issues Covered

    1. Proper use of materials, tools, and equipment
    2. Use of protective equipment
    3. Safe and effective participation in team work

    IV.  Visual Literacy and Critical Analysis

    1. Individual critiques
    2. Group critique


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020

  
  •  

    ART 124 - Metal Casting

    1.00 Credits, 1.50 Contact Hours
    0.50 lecture periods 1 lab period

    Introduction to metal casting.  Includes metal casting techniques, and individualized projects.

    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of two credit hours.  If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the use of metal casting techniques including proper safety.
    2. Create an individualized project using metal casting techniques.

    Outline:
    I. Metal Casting Techniques

    1. Wax forming
    2. Investment mold making
    3. Wax burn out
    4. Metal chasing and finishing
    5. Health and safety practices in metal casting

    II. Individualized Project Possibilities

    1. Non-representational form
    2. Abstraction
    3. Kinetic
    4. Functional object


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 126 - Metal Fabrication

    1.00 Credits, 1.50 Contact Hours
    0.50 lecture periods 1 lab period

    Introduction to metal fabrication. Includes metal fabrication techniques and safety procedures, and development of an individualized project.

    Information: May be taken two times of a maximum of two credit hours.  If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the use of metal fabrication techniques including proper health and safety processes.
    2. Create an individualized project using metal fabrication techniques.

    Outline:
    I. Metal Fabrication Techniques and Safety Procedures

    1. Oxy-fuel, stick, MIG, and TIG Welding
    2. Oxy-fuel, plasma, shear, and saw cutting
    3. Brake bender, iron bender, hammer, and English wheel forming
    4. Heat forging

    II. Individualized Project Possibilities

    1. Non-representational form
    2. Abstraction
    3. Kinetic
    4. Functional object


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 128 - Digital Photography I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Introduction to digital photography emphasizing the technical and aesthetic issues and how these qualities form image content. Includes Adobe Photoshop basics, history of still photography, applications of digital cameras, aspects of the digital medium, camera and computer equipment requirements, digital still camera, memory and file formats, digital still camera lenses, and proper exposure. Also includes light, color, and temperature; depth of field, shutter speed effects, proper use of digital photography, lighting for digital stills, elements of composition, photographic rendering and reality, outputting and publishing, portfolio preparation, and career options in digital photography.

    Recommendation: Adobe Photoshop experience is highly recommended before enrolling in this course.
    Information: It is recommended students have access to a digital camera with manual exposure control and a computer with image processing software. Professional photographic equipment, including cameras, are available for check out on a rotating basis. Professional quality computers, software, printers, lighting equipment, and studio will be provided for specific assignments. There will be additional supply costs beyond course fees.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate general knowledge of the history of photography as an art form and its modern applications in photojournalism, commercial, and editorial illustration.
    2. Demonstrate operation of digital cameras competently.
    3. Demonstrate skills in editing, processing, and printing in a digital darkroom.
    4. Create a conceptually and technically photographic portfolio.

    Outline:
    1. History of Photography and Photography Applications
      1. The use of photography during the 1900’s
      2. The use of photography in contemporary practices including but not limited to, photojournalism, commercial, editorial illustration, and fine art
    2. Digital Still Camera
      1. Aperture
      2. Shutter speed
      3. ISO
      4. Camera manual and specifications
      5. Camera body functions
      6. Liquid crystal display (LCD)
      7. Optical viewfinders and the single lens reflex (SLR)
      8. Automatic vs. manual
      9. Battery power
      10. Accessories
      11. Simple process for use
    3. Adobe Bridge, Adobe Photoshop, and Printing
      1. Organizing digital files
      2. Tonality
      3. Color correction
      4. Sharpening
      5. Color management
      6. Paper types
    4. Photographic Portfolio
      1. Concept
      2. Size and scale
      3. Editing


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/2022
  
  •  

    ART 130 - Art and Culture: Prehistoric through Gothic [SUN# ART 1101]

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    A survey of the development of art and architecture in Western Civilization from prehistoric through Gothic art with the inclusion of a global perspective. Includes identification and interpretation of cultural and stylistic characteristics, contextual functions and purposes of works of art, influences of cultural values on the production of art, art historical terminology, exemplars of non-Western culture, and critical methodologies.

    Prerequisite(s): With a C or better: WRT 101 , WRT 101HC WRT 101S , or WRT 101SE 
    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - HUM and I, G; Meets CTE - A&H or SBS and G.



      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify and interpret cultural and stylistic characteristics of works of art produced during Paleolithic through Gothic periods.
    2. Describe and decode functions and purposes of works of art in their own historical context.
    3. Discuss and analyze geographic, religious, social, political, and economic influences on art production.
    4. Define and use correct art historical terminology describing form and content.
    5. Identify and discuss major examples of non-Western art production from prehistory to 1300.
    6. Identify and discuss methodologies of art historical analysis and new perspectives in the discipline.

    Outline:
    I: Intensive Writing and Critical Inquiry

          A. Producing written discourse in more than one assignment through papers, reports, quizzes, tests, etc., which includes a minimum word standard of 3000 words.

          B. Written assignments emphasize critical inquiry which includes the gathering, interpreting, and evaluating of evidence.

          C. Includes a formal out of class paper of at least 1,500 words which requires critical inquiry and where the writer develops and supports a main idea.  

          D. Explicit writing instruction with timely feedback to help students improve their writing and critical inquiry skills is part of the course’s content.

          E. The evaluation of written assignments must include the overall quality of written work and critical inquiry, as measured by a rubric.

          F. At least 50% of the student’s grade must be based on the written work and critical inquiry assignments.

    II: Identification and Interpretation of Cultural and Stylistic Characteristics

          A. Prehistory

          B. Near Eastern

          C. Egyptian

          D. Aegean

          E. Greek

          F. Etruscan

         G. Roman

         H. Early Christian

           I. Early Medieval

          J. Byzantine

          K. Islamic

          L. Romanesque

         M. Gothic

    III: Contextual Functions and Purposes of Works of Art

         A. Patronage

         B. Religious/spiritual

         C. Political/social

         D. Expressive/psychological

    IV. Influences of Cultural Values on the Production of Art

         A. Geographic influences on culture

         B. Social values

         C. Religious values

         D. Economic values

         E. Political values

         F. Personal values

    V. Art Historical Terminology

        A. Terminology related to formal analysis focusing on media and technique

        B. Terminology related to iconography

        C. Terminology related to style

        D. Terminology related to critical methodologies

    VI: Exemplars of Non-Western Culture

         A. Global perceptions of art

         B. Asian art

         C. Indigenous cultures of the Americas art

         D. African art

         E. Pacific cultures art

    VII: Critical Methodologies

         A. Formal analysis

         B. Iconographic analysis

         C. Biographical investigation

         D. Cultural theories

         E. Feminist theory

         F. Semiotics


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021-2022

  
  •  

    ART 131 - Art and Culture: Late Gothic through Modern Periods [SUN# ART 1102]

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    A survey of the development of art and architecture in western civilization from late Gothic through Modern periods. Includes recognition and interpretation of period and style characteristics, function and purposes of art, influences on art production, issues in production and content, historical terminology, and critical methodologies.

    Prerequisite(s): With a C or better: WRT 101 , WRT 101HC  , WRT 101S , or WRT 101SE .
    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - HUM and I, G; Meets CTE - A&H or SBS and G.


      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify and interpret cultural and stylistic characteristics of work of art produced during Late Gothic through Modern periods.
    2. Describe and decode functions and purposes of works of art in their historical context.
    3. Discuss and analyze religious, social, political, and economic influences on art production.
    4. Identify and discuss contextual issues surrounding art production and art images.
    5. Define and use correct art historical terminology describing form and content.
    6. Identify and utilize methodologies of art historical analysis.

    Outline:
    1. Intensive Writing and Critical Inquiry
      1. Producing written discourse in more than one assignment through papers, reports, quizzes, tests, etc., which includes a minimum word standard of 3000 words.
      2. Written assignments emphasize critical inquiry which includes the gathering, interpreting, andvaluating of evidence.
      3. Includes a formal out of class paper of at least 1,500 words which requires critical inquiry and where the writer develops and supports a main idea.  
      4.         Explicit writing instruction with timely feedback to help students improve their writing and critical inquiry skills is part of the course’s content.
      5.         The evaluation of written assignments must include the overall quality of written work and critical inquiry, as measured by a rubric.
      6.         At least 50% of the student’s grade must be based on the written work and critical inquiry assignments.
    2. Recognition and Interpretation of Period and Style Characteristics Covering the Following Centuries
      1. 14th Century
      2. 15th Century
      3. 16th Century
      4. 17th Century
      5. 18th Century
      6. 19th Century
      7. 20th Century
    3. Functions and Purposes of Art Within Their Historical Context
      1. Attribution
      2. Patronage
      3. Communication of information
      4. Spiritual/religious
      5. Social/political
      6. Personal/cultural
    4. Influences on Art Production
      1. Economic developments
      2. Religion’s place in society
      3. Development of nationalism
      4. Industrial, American, French, Russian
      5. Globalization
      6. Effects of war
    5. Issues in Production and Content
      1. Restoration and maintenance
      2. Patronage and the art market
      3. Ethnocentrism, primitivism, colonialism, nationalism
      4. Gender/sexuality
      5. The Avant-garde
      6. Censorship
    6. Art Historical Terminology
      1. Terminology related to formal analysis focusing on media and technique
      2. Terminology related to iconography
      3. Terminology related to style
      4. Terminology related to critical methodologies
    7. Critical Methodologies
      1. Formal analysis
      2. Iconographic analysis
      3. Contemporary cultural theories
      4. Biographical investigation
      5. Feminist theory
      6. Semiotics
      7. Psychoanalysis


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021-2022
  
  •  

    ART 136 - Body and Art

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    A visual cultural exploration of how humans utilize the body as a vehicle for communicating and displaying personal and group identities. Includes anthropological and art historical study of types of permanent and temporary body decorations, masks, and performance; and the ethical issues surrounding the study and use of imagery within and between cultures. Also includes the conceptual examination of global examples and an overview of practical projects to demonstrate the continued vitality of each mode of expression.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe body art and performance as vehicles of individual and group identity.
    2. Discuss ethical issues surrounding the study and use of imagery within and between cultures.
    3. Summarize the role of body art and performance for human survival in local contexts.
    4. Discuss the role of body art and performance in human rites of passage.
    5. Identify types of body art and performance in entertainment and storytelling.
    6. Explain the relation between body art, performance and the social construction of gender.
    7. Observe and/or demonstrate styles and techniques of body art and performance.

    Outline:
    1. Body Art and Society: An Introduction to Basic Concepts
      1. Identity and group membership
      2. “Folk” art and culture
      3. Disguise and revelation
    2. Ethics and Esthetics
      1. Ethics of the access to and reproduction of images within and between cultures
      2. Sacred imagery: process, product, usage
      3. Cultural patrimony
      4. Tourist art
    3. Body Art and Survival
      1. Performance: art, tribe, and individual
      2. Subsistence
      3. Spirits and blessing
      4. Armor: offense and defense
      5. Tribe and shaman
    4. Body Art and Ritual
      1. Rites of passage: transformation and renewal
      2. Seasons
      3. Liminality and the Carnivalesque
    5. Body Art and Storytelling
      1. Performance: narration and language
      2. Persona
      3. Theater
      4. Music and dance  Architecture and framing space
    6. Body Art and Gender
      1. Gender, sex, and sexuality
      2. Crossing gender boundaries
    7. Creation of Body Art
      1. Styles
      2. Techniques: permanent and temporary


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 140 - Photography I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to black and white photography as an art form with an emphasis on fundamental technique of the camera and wet darkroom. Includes manual camera competencies, manual film development, basic darkroom procedures, portfolio building, visual literacy and critical analysis, and the role of photography.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate general knowledge of historical and contemporary photography through diverse cultural and aesthetic contexts. 
    2. Demonstrate manual operation of a 35mm camera.
    3. Demonstrate processing films and printing full tonal range gelatin silver prints in wet darkroom.
    4. Create a visual and technical photographic portfolio.

    Outline:
    1. History of Photography
      1. The use of photography during 19th and 20th centuries
      2. The use of photography in contemporary practices
    2. Manual Camera Competencies
      1. Aperture
        1. Depth of field
        2. Variations and control
      2. Shutter speeds
        1. Motion
        2. Panning and controls
      3. Light meter and exposure
      4. Lenses
      5. ISO
    3. Manual Film Development
      1. Types of film
      2. Chemical procedures
      3. Time and temperature
      4. Printing black and white negatives
        1. Paper surfaces and tones
        2. Handling film
      5. Contrast filters
      6. Burning and dodging
    4. Portfolio Building
      1. Assignments demonstrating technical competencies
      2. Assignments demonstrating visual competencies
      3. Presentation
        1. Dry mounting
        2. Spotting


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021
  
  •  

    ART 141 - Photography II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Principles and processes of intermediate black and white photography. Includes use of various types of camera formats, development of film, creating a series, individual darkroom space, advanced darkroom techniques, portfolio production, exhibition presentation, copy slide production, and verbalization of visual perceptions.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 140  
    Information: Student is required to submit a portfolio for review.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate use of multiple camera formats and skill in film development system.
    2. Demonstrate printing skill in darkroom.
    3. Demonstrate ability in critical analysis and visual literacy
    4. Create a conceptual series of photographic portfolio.

    Outline:
    I.      Use of Various Types of Camera Formats and Skill in Film Development System

    A.    Small, 35mm

            B.    Medium, 2 ¼”

            C.    Large, 4” x 5”

    D. Development of a minimum of ten (10) rolls of film manually processed and proofed

    II.     Printing Skill in a Darkroom

               A.    Burning and dodging with filters

               B.    Contrast manipulation

               C.    Experimentation with paper surfaces and tones

               D.    Toning

       III.     Critical Analysis and Verbalization of Visual Perceptions

    1. Critiques
    2. Discussions
    3. Attending artist lecture

    IV.   Creating a Series

    1.   Contact sheet
    2.   Twenty work prints (minimum)
    3. Individual conference
    4. Twelve archival fine art prints (minimum)


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 146 - Lighting for Photography I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Introduction to creative professional lighting concepts and techniques for commercial and fine art photography. Includes lighting and studio equipment, light qualities, lighting for form, lighting for surface qualities, still- life photography, portrait photography, image composition, critical analysis, and portfolio.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 128  
    Information: Students are strongly recommended to own or have access to a digital camera with manual exposure control and a computer with image processing software. Professional quality cameras, computers and software, printers, lighting equipment and studio will be provided for specific assignments. There may be additional supply costs in addition to course fees. 


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate skill with professional quartz halogen lighting, studio equipment, incident light meter, and professional cameras and lenses.
    2. Control light qualities including direction, contrast, size and scale, and diffusion.
    3. Demonstrate skill in lighting for form by use of chiaroscuro.
    4. Perform lighting for surface qualities that are smooth, textured, reflective, and transparent.
    5. Photograph a still life by use of organization, composition, environment, and lighting.
    6. Create portraiture by use of lighting patterns, poses, and lighting techniques.
    7. Demonstrate skill in image composition.
    8. Develop critical analysis and visual literacy, and an understanding of the roles of photography in the diverse contemporary society.
    9. Produce basic portfolio building including technical and aesthetic unity and quality.

    Outline:
    1. Lighting and Studio Equipment
    1. Types of continuous light sources
    2. Professional quartz halogen lights – use and safe handling
    3. Studio equipment – use and safe handling
    4. Incident light meters
    5. Professional cameras and lenses
    6. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Light Qualities
    1. Direct
    2. Contrast
    1. Light contrast
    2. Subject contrast
    3. Scene contrast
    1. Size and scale
    2. Diffusion
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Lighting For Form
    1. Differentiating shape and form
    2. Creating chiaroscuro
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Lighting For Surface Qualities
    1. Smooth and textured surfaces
    2. Reflective and metal surfaces
    3. Transparent and glass surfaces
    4. Assignment demonstrating competency
    1. Still-Life Photography
    1. Scale, organization, and composition
    2. Background and environment
    3. Applying learned lighting techniques
    4. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Portrait Photography
    1. Portrait lighting patterns
    2. Posing and posture
    3. Applying learned lighting techniques
    4. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Image Composition
    1. Elements of composition
    2. Photographic rendering
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Critical Analysis
    1. Group and individual critiques
    2. Discussions of photographic history and culture
    3. Written review of exhibition
    1. Portfolio
    1. Types of portfolio
    2. Technical and aesthetic unity and quality
    3. Demonstrate competency by producing a final portfolio of ten 8 ½ x 11 inch prints with technical and aesthetic unity and quality


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/2022
  
  •  

    ART 147 - Alternative Processes in Photography

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Designed for the advanced image maker interested in expanding knowledge of alternative photographic processes. Includes enlarging negatives for contact printing, nineteenth century processes, twentieth century processes, darkroom materials, and artwork presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 128  or ART 140  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Create enlarged continuous tone digital negatives specific to each process.
    2. Demonstrate the use of the following nineteenth century processes: cyanotype, Van Dyke, salt paper printing, gum dichromate, and palladium.
    3. Demonstrate the use of the following twentieth century processes: instant dye transfer, instant emulsion, transfer, and printing on fabric.
    4. Develop a non-silver dark room.
    5. Prepare art work for exhibition.

    Outline:
    1. Enlarging Negatives for Contact Printing
    1. Digital option
    2. Continuous tone, orthochromatic
    1. Nineteenth Century Processes
    1. Cyanotype
    2. Van Dyke
    3. Salt paper
    4. Gum dichromate
    5. Platinum/palladium
    1. Twentieth Century Processes
    1. Instant dye transfer
    2. Instant emulsion transfer
    3. Photo emulsion
    1. Darkroom Materials
    1. Exposure light sources
    2. Contact printing frame options
    3. Printing surfaces, paper, natural fiber
    4. Purchase materials and supplies nationally
    1. Artwork Presentation
    1. Mounting
    2. Framing


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2013
  
  •  

    ART 160 - Ceramics I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to ceramics. Includes beginning handbuilding techniques and methods of fabrication, wheel throwing and trimming, projects involving formal elements, beginning ceramic techniques, reduction firing, raku firing, ceramic artist research, discussion, and exploration topics.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course or concurrent enrollment. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to perform various handbuilding techniques and other methods of fabrication at the beginning level.
    2. Practice wheel throwing and trimming techniques.
    3. Complete several projects that involve the elements of scale, texture, form, and functionality.
    4. Produce ceramic art using basic techniques.
    5. Demonstrate the practice and application of chemical change through cone 10 reduction firing.
    6. Produce a raku fire piece using specified glazing and cooling reduction techniques and processes.
    7. Research, write, and present information on an individual ceramic artist.
    8. Discuss various topics related to the design, aesthetics and history of ceramic art.

    Outline:
    1. Beginning Handbuilding Techniques/Methods of Fabrication
    1. Pinch
    2. Coil
    3. Slab
    1. Wheel Throwing and Trimming
    2. Projects Involving Formal Elements
    1. Scale
    2. Texture
    3. Form
    4. Functionality
    1. Beginning Ceramic Techniques
    1. Glazing
    1. Chemical change in oxidation
    2. Chemical change in reduction
    1. Firing temperatures
    1. Cone 10 Reduction Firing
    1. Oxidation
    2. Reduction
    1. Raku Firing
    2. Ceramic Artist Research
    3. Ceramic Discussion/Exploration Topics
    1. Design
    2. Aesthetics
    3. History of ceramic art


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2012
  
  •  

    ART 170 - Metalwork I: Jewelry

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Exploration of the basic techniques and design approaches used in the fabrication of jewelry and other metalwork. Includes information and background on historical and contemporary metalwork and jewelry, and techniques and processes of jewelry and metalwork.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100 before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate design skills and discuss the aesthetics of contemporary and historical jewelry and metalwork.
    2. Demonstrate proper use of basic jewelry tools and equipment.
    3. Describe and discuss the functional limitations of jewelry making.
    4. Describe, discuss, and apply safety and health procedures related to tools and materials.

    Outline:
    1. Information and Background on Historical and Contemporary Metalwork and Jewelry
      1. Metal works from antiquity
      2. Industrial and modern design
      3. Contemporary metal work design and practices
    2. Techniques and Processes of Jewelry and Metalwork
      1. Cold joining
      2. Soldering
      3. Piercing and sawing
      4. Forming
      5. Surface treatment
      6. Stone setting
      7. Finishing
    3. Functional Aspects in Jewelry Making
      1. Wearability
      2. Reactivity of metals
    4. Instruction in All Aspects of Safety and Health Procedures
      1. Personal protective equipment
      2. Equipment procedures
      3. Lab hygiene and waste disposal procedures


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021
  
  •  

    ART 175 - Ferrous Metalwork: Blacksmithing

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the materials, design, techniques, safety habits, and methods used in ferrous metalwork. Includes basic techniques in blacksmithing and metal lab procedures.  

    Information: Completion of ART 100  is recommended before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes

    1.      Demonstrate basic techniques used in blacksmithing.

    2.       Exhibit good safety habits and the ability to use equipment safely and properly.


    Outline:
    I.       Basic Techniques in Blacksmithing

    A.   Drawing

    B.   Upsetting

    C.   Bending

    D.   Twisting

    E.   Punching

    F.   Riveting

    G.   Chisel cutting

    H.   Hammer texturing

    I.    Polishing

    J.   Grinding/filing/sanding

    K.   Basic hardening and tempering of high carbon tool steel

    L.   Specialty steels

    M.  Case hardening

    N.   Forge welding

    II.       Metal Lab Procedures in Blacksmithing

    A.   Health and safety issues

    B.   Proper use of tools and equipment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 210 - Drawing II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 110 . Includes strengthening of drawing and critical thinking skills. Also includes intermediate drawing and design problems; intermediate use of materials and techniques; perceptual skill and personal development; critique process; engagement and analysis of professional art events or galleries; and portfolio creation.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 110  
    Information: Prerequisite(s) may be waived with consent of instructor.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply design elements and principles to drawing to solve graphic problems.
    2. Further explore and apply diverse drawing media, techniques and observational skills to various subjects in still life, nature studies, figure drawing, and personal and cultural iconography.
    3. Discuss and demonstrate technical and expressive problems and processes of seeing and communicating visual ideas using drawing media.
    4. Evaluate and analyze work of self and others utilizing critical thinking and appropriate terminology through oral and written critique processes.
    5. Observe and critique professional art events and/or gallery exhibitions via online or local venues using many sophisticated and accurate art terminology.
    6. Produce a portfolio of drawings in a variety of media and subjects from observation and imagination.

    Outline:
    1. Intermediate Drawing and Design Problems
    1. Line
    2. Value
    3. Texture
    4. Color
    5. Volume
    6. Contrast
    7. Space
    8. Composition
    9. Expressive and contextual invention
    1. Intermediate Use of Materials and Techniques
    1. Materials
    1. Dry media
    2. Wet media
    3. Mixed media
    4. Digital media
    1. Intermediate drawing methods, approaches and techniques
    1. Mark making
    2. Measurement strategies
    3. Value/volume modeling techniques
    4. Perspective
    5. Mapping
    6. Identify resources to develop imagery
    1. Perceptual Skill and Personal Development
    1. Demonstrate observational skills: perspective and proportional properties
    2. Demonstrate intermediate diagrammatic and/or mapping communication with personal invention
    3. Identify and choose a variety of appropriate drawing materials and approaches indication development of personal expression
    1. Critique Process
    1. Participate in individual and group critiques using visual terminology
    2. Critically evaluate personal work and work of classmates
    3. Utilize and further develop analytical and critical thinking skills
    1. Engagement and Analysis of Professional Art Events or Galleries
    1. Visit online, local or regional galleries, art events and/or museums
    2. Complete written analysis per instructor guidelines
    3. Address contemporary and/or historical works of art
    1. Portfolio Creation
    1. Complete portfolio of twelve (12) finished drawings
    2. Individual and group review of work


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2013
  
  •  

    ART 212 - Printmaking I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to basic aesthetics and techniques of printmaking. Includes intaglio techniques, relief printing, monotype techniques, and final presentation.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the use and/or techniques in intaglio printmaking: drypoint and/or engraving, hard ground etching, soft ground etching, and aquatint etching.
    2. Demonstrate the use and/or technique relief printing from wood or linoleum, or constructed materials.  .
    3. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of monotype printing. 
    4. Demonstrate the ability to mat and frame print(s) and indicate edition. 

    Outline:
    1. Intaglio Techniques
      1. Drypoint
      2. Hard ground
      3. Soft ground
      4. Aquatint
    2. Relief Printing
      1. Wood and/or linoleum and/or sintra substrates
      2. Working with different gouges
      3. Constructed surfaces
    3. Monotype Techniques
      1. Rolling, wiping, inking
      2. Xerox or citris-solve or gel medium or other transfer
    4. Final Presentation
      1. Edition(s)
      2. Matting
      3. Framing


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 213 - Life Drawing I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Drawing of human figures using the two-dimension concept as a graphic vehicle of expression. Includes gesture and contour drawing, varied time length poses, drawing problems, variety of materials, and individual and group critiques of work.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 110  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate drawing processes using the human figure as subject via gesture drawing.
    2. Develop perceptual skills of positive and negative shapes through contour drawing of the figure.
    3. Display skill sets of perception through varied time-length poses.
    4. Analyze and address drawing problems of anatomical proportions and compositional issues.
    5. Develop abilities to work with a variety of traditional and non-traditional materials.
    6. Contribute to individual and group critiques.

    Outline:
    1. Gesture Drawing of the Figure
    2. Contour Drawing of the Figure
    3. Varied Time-Length Poses – From One Minute Poses to 5 Hour Poses
    4. Drawing Problems
      1. Line
      2. Body proportions and anatomical relationships
      3. Compositional elements
      4. Figure ground relationships
      5. Value
      6. Negative space
    5. Variety of Materials
      1. Charcoal
      2. Ink
      3. Graphite
      4. Conte
      5. Crayon
      6. Non traditional

    VI.    Individual and Group Critiques of Work


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015

  
  •  

    ART 214 - Printmaking II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 212 . Includes advanced problems in aesthetics and techniques of intaglio projects and techniques, relief printing, monotype techniques, and multi-process and alternative approaches to printmaking.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 212  



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate expanded use of intaglio processes (hard ground, soft ground, drypoint, and aquatint).
    2. Demonstrate expanded relief-printing process.
    3. Demonstrate expanded use of monotype printing with addition of color, overlays, and Xerox and/or other transfers.
    4. Demonstrate multi-process printing.

    Outline:
    1. Intaglio Projects and Techniques: Multi-Plate and Multi-Color Possibilities Expanded
      1. Drypoint
      2. Hard ground
      3. Soft ground
      4. Aquatint
      5. Edition(s)
    2. Relief Printing: Multi-Plate and Multi-Color Possibilities
      1. Wood and/or linoleum and/or sintra substrates
      2. Working with different gouges
      3. Constructed surfaces

    III.    Monotype Techniques: Multi-Plate and Multi-Color Possibilities

    A.     Rolling, wiping, inking

    B.     Xerox and/or citris-solve and/or gel medium and/or offset transfers

    IV. Multi-Process and Alternative Approaches to Printmaking


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017

  
  •  

    ART 215 - Painting I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the fundamentals of oil painting. Includes basic painting techniques and processes, manipulation of compositional elements and formal and contemporary pictorial organization in various genres, surface preparation, personal direction and artistic expression, and health and safety in the painting studio.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 115  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Implement basic painting techniques and processes.
    2. Develop compositional elements in oil or acrylic paint which includes formal pictorial organization.
    3. Demonstrate each of the following: monochromatic and polychromatic painting; landscape/architectural painting; figure painting; portrait painting which can address the illusion of mass and either atmospheric space and/or linear perspective.
    4. Explore preparation of various matrixes, including the stretching of canvas, and panel and paper preparation.
    5. Demonstrate artistic development by using observational and/or photographic resources, participating in individual and group critiques, and exploring and developing personal direction.
    6. Discuss health and safety standards applied in a painting studio.

    Outline:
    1. Basic Painting Techniques and Processes
    1. Glazing, grisaille, impasto
    2. Indirect: underpainting/overpainting, layering, glazing
    3. Direct: alla prima, impasto, wet-in-wet
    4. Palette/color mixing techniques
    1. Development of Compositional Elements and Formal Pictorial Organization
    1. Line, shape, texture
    2. Color and value, modeling with paint
    3. Linear and atmospheric space
    1. Demonstrate the Manipulation of Pictorial Elements in Genres
    1. Still life and viewpoint
    2. Landscape/architectural space: atmospheric and linear perspective
    3. The body and portrait: the depiction of mass and context
    4. Art historical references and movements
    1. Surface Preparation
    1. Paper preparation techniques
    2. Board preparation techniques
    3. How to build a canvas and other preparation techniques
    1. Artistic Development
    1. Incorporate critical thinking into creative process
    2. Observe, examine, and discover to create with personal direction
    1. Health and Safety in the Painting Studio
    1. Toxins, pigments, mediums and solvents
    1. Inhalation
    2. Ingestion
    3. Exposure to skin
    1. Sink maintenance
    2. Easel maintenance
    3. Paint cabinet maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 216 - Screenprinting I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to screenprinting using water base and inks. Includes screen construction, direct stencil techniques, photographic techniques, one-color printing, multicolor printing and registration, overview of the types of printing papers, and final presentation.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of screen construction in screenprinting.
    2. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of the stencil in screenprinting.
    3. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of photo film in screenprinting.
    4. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of printing with one color in screenprinting.
    5. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of printing with multicolor in screenprinting.
    6. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of registration in screenprinting.
    7. Demonstrate the use and/or technique of printing on paper or other materials in screenprinting.
    8. Mat and frame and indicate edition of print(s).

    Outline:
    1. Screen Construction and/or Use of Squeegie
    2. Direct Stencil Techniques
      1. Paper stencils method
      2. Litho-crayon/glue/drawing fluid method
      3. Screen filler/direct blockout/Tusche method
      4. Cut film method
    3. Photographic Techniques
      1. Photographic emulsion method
      2. Photographic film methods
    4. One-Color Printing
    5. Multicolor Printing and Registration
      1. Sequencing of colors
      2. Trapping
    6. Registration
      1. Alignment
      2. Substrates
    7. Overview of Types of Printing Papers
    8. Final Presentation
      1. Matting
      2. Framing
      3. Edition(s)


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 217 - Painting II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 215 . Includes intermediate development and reinforcement of basic oil painting techniques and processes, development of compositional elements and formal pictorial organization, manipulation of pictorial elements, artistic expression, and health and safety in the painting studio.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 215  
    Recommendation: Completion of ART 115  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: Prerequisite(s) may be waived with consent of instructor.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Implement basic and complex painting techniques and processes.
    2. Demonstrate exploration of compositional elements in oil, acrylic and/or mixed media, which includes formal traditional and non-traditional pictorial organization.
    3. Demonstrate intermediate manipulation of pictorial elements in representational and/or personal iconography. 
    4. Demonstrate artistic development by using observational, inventive and/or other visual resources, participate in individual and group critiques, use critical thinking in developing own work, and explore and develop personal direction.
    5. Discuss health and safety standards applied in a painting studio. 

    Outline:
    1. Intermediate Painting Techniques and Processes 
    1. Transfer methods, substrates, mixed media techniques
    2. Indirect: underpainting/overpainting, glazing, layering, blending
    3. Direct: alla prima, wet-in-wet, impasto
    4. Approaches to color
    1. Development of Compositional Elements and Formal Pictorial Organization
    1. Intermediate manipulation of line, shape, and texture
    2. Intermediate color and value modeling
    3. Linear, atmosphere, and ambiguous space
    4. Art historical references, contemporary masters, and movements
    1. Demonstrate Intermediate Manipulation of Pictorial Elements
    1. Painting from observation and/or imagination
    2. Space: atmospheric and/or linear perspective, plein air and/or visual resources
    3. Personal iconography
    1. Artistic Development
    1. Pictorial and skill development through observational, inventive, or other visual resources
    2. Incorporate critical thinking into creative process
    3. Observe, examine, discover, and develop to create with personal direction
    1. Health and Safety in the Painting Studio
    1. Pigments, mediums, toxins, and solvents
    1. Inhalation
    2. Ingestion
    3. Exposure to skin
    1. Sink maintenance
    2. Easel maintenance
    3. Paint storage maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2013
  
  •  

    ART 218 - Screenprinting II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 216 . Includes equipment orientation, advanced stencil-making techniques, printing, and types of printing papers and surfaces.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 216  
    Information: Students may select areas of interest for concentration and refinement of skills.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the various equipment employed in screenprinting.
    2. Demonstrate advanced problem-solving in traditional stencil techniques.
    3. Demonstrate experimental, nontraditional screenprinting and multicolor techniques.
    4. Present a portfolio of several prints and discuss work using critical analysis in group/individual critiques.

    Outline:
    1. Equipment Orientation
      1. Textbooks
      2. Materials
      3. Screen preparation, mesh count, and tension
    2. Advanced Stencil-Making Techniques
      1. Speedball drawing liquids
      2. Glue-crayon method
      3. Tusche-glue method
      4. Cut-film technique (water film, lacquer film)
      5. Photo-film method
      6. Paper stencil
    3. Printing
      1. Multicolor printing and registration techniques
      2. Printing techniques
    1. Holding the paper down while printing
    2. Estimating the amount of ink needed
    3. Flood stroke
    4. Squeegee manipulation
    5. Registration of image

    IV. Types of Printing Papers and Surfaces

    1. Types of printing papers and weights
    2. Matting and the care of the print
    3. Editions in printing
    4. Discussion and critical analysis of final works


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016

  
  •  

    ART 219 - Printmaking III

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 214 . Includes experimentation with intaglio, multi-color possibilities with non-traditional compositions, relief and intaglio multi-processes, monoprint with multiple plates, and critical analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 214  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate experimental, non-traditional use of medium.
    2. Demonstrate advanced problem-solving in traditional intaglio processes.   
    3. Demonstrate advanced multi-process printing. 
    4. Demonstrate expanded use of monotype printing with additional color plates and/or nontoxic processes. 
    5. Discuss personal prints and engage critical analysis.

    Outline:
    1. Experimentation With Intaglio, Relief and/or Other Print Processes
      1. Creative combinations  
      2. Viscosity printing  
    2. Multi-Color Possibilities With Non-Traditional Compositions  
      1. Two-color combinations, and/or shaped/cut plates
      2. Viscosity printing  
    3. Combing Relief and Intaglio Multi-Processes
      1. Wood, zinc or copper
      2. Acrylic and/or acetate, transparent substrates for registration
      3. Chin colle or nontraditional collage processes
      4. Solarplates and ImageOn and/or solar/non-solar photo processes
    4. Expand on Monoprint With Multiple Plates, Offset or Varied Multiples Runs
      1. Creative combinations and registration  
      2. Viscosity printing with oil-based or water-based inks  
      3. Ghost prints with additional development
    5. Critical Analysis
      1. Use accurate print terminology of tools and processes in discussions/critiques
      2. Relate contemporary and historical references and solutions to personal work
      3. Final portfolio of intermediate to advanced prints


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 220 - Sculpture

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Exploration of methods, materials, and content used in sculpture. Includes studio project concept, media and technique, sculpture lab health and safety procedures, and visual literacy and critical analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 120  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate development of content through exploration of sculptural concepts.
    2. Demonstrate development of skills in using a range of three-dimensional media and techniques. 
    3. Demonstrate safe work practices and the ability to use equipment safely and properly.
    4. Demonstrate visual literacy and critical analysis skills.

    Outline:
    1. Studio Project Concept
      1. Figure/body
      2. Object based
      3. Installation
      4. Kinetic  
      5. Interactive
    2. Media and Technique
      1. Casting
      2. Modeling
      3. Mold making
      4. Fabrication
      5. Metals fabrication
      6. Carving
      7. Finishing techniques
    3. Sculpture Lab Health and Safety Procedures
      1. Personal protective equipment use
      2. Proper use of tools and equipment
        1. Machine and tool guards
        2. Proper safety application
        3. Ventilation
        4. Safety demonstrations
      3. Proper safety processes
    4. Visual Literacy and Critical Analysis
      1. Individual critiques
      2. Group critique  


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 223 - Life Drawing II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of Life Drawing I. Advanced drawing of human figures using the two-dimension concept as a graphic vehicle of expression. Includes proportional sight strategies, varied time-length poses, drawing problems and materials, figure as expression, and individual and group critiques of work.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 213  
    Recommendation: Completion of ART 210  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate drawing processes using the human figure as subject via gesture drawing, tonal and contour drawing.
    2. Develop perceptual skills of positive/negative shapes, sight strategies of triangulation and proportional comparisons.
    3. Utilize varied time-length poses to understand the figure and environmental context.
    4. Analyze and address drawing problems of anatomical proportions and compositional issues.
    5. Balance the modeling of anatomical features with compositional expression and the human form as statement.
    6. Contribute to individual and group critiques.

    Outline:
    1. Gesture and Contour Drawing of the Figure
    2. Sight Strategies for Proportion
      1. Positive and negative compositional layout
      2. Site landmarks for triangulation
      3. Translate spatial relationships to calibrate proportional comparisons
    3. Varied Time-Length Poses – From One Minute Poses to Five (5) Hour Poses: Compositional Context
      1. Observational contextual selection
      2. Inventive contextual expression
    4. Drawing Problems and Materials
      1. Compositional issues of figure ground relationships
      2. Line, shape, value, and color to establish forms, space, and expression
      3. Problem solve strategies to address composition and proportion issues
      4. Dry media: charcoal, graphite, conte/pastel, etc., as an expressive vehicle
      5. Wet media: ink, paint and/or nontraditional media as an expressive vehicle
    5. Figure as Expression
      1. Develop compositional focus within symmetrical/asymmetrical balance
      2. Establish rendering accuracy of anatomical features
      3. Create expressive compositional context for the human form

     VI.   Individual and Group Critiques of Work


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2016

  
  •  

    ART 227 - Painting III

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 217 . Includes intermediate and advanced painting techniques and processes, exploration of compositional elements, color and value modeling, creative employment of perspective, manipulation of pictorial elements, artistic development, artist statement, and health and safety in the studio.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 217  
    Information: Prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Implement intermediate and complex painting techniques and processes.
    2. Demonstrate informed exploration of compositional elements in oil, acrylic, and/or mixed media, which includes traditional and/or non-traditional pictorial organization and explores more advanced painting concepts. 
    3. Demonstrate intermediate to advanced manipulation of pictorial elements using representational, abstract, and/or personal iconography. 
    4. Demonstrate further artistic development, using observational, inventive, and/or other visual resources. 
    5. Discuss contemporary issues and trends from web research and/or gallery/museum visits.
    6. Create an artist statement. 
    7. Discuss health and safety standards applied in a painting studio.

    Outline:
    1. Intermediate and Advanced Painting Techniques and Processes 
      1. Transfer methods, substrates, mixed media techniques. (traditional, archival and nontraditional)
      2. Indirect: underpainting/overpainting, glazing, layering techniques, blending and mediums
      3. Direct: alla prima, wet-in-wet, impasto
      4. Personal approach to value and color, lighting, and color schematics
    2. Informed Exploration of Compositional Elements
      1. Intermediate manipulation of line, shape, and texture
      2. Advanced manipulation of line, shape, and texture
    3. Intermediate to Advanced Color and Value Modeling
    4. Creative Employment of Perspective: Linear, Atmospheric and/or Ambiguous Space
    5. Intermediate to Advanced Manipulation of Pictorial Elements
      1. Painting from observation, imagination, visual resources, and/or abstraction.
      2. Further facilitation in the development of personal style and/or iconography 
    6. Artistic Development
      1. Explore advanced painting concepts, art historical references, and contemporary trends, issues and methods in painting
      2. Critical thinking and creative process
      3. Further technical and conceptual skills and increased self-discipline
      4. Observe, examine, discover, and develop to create with personal direction
      5. Participate in individual and group critiques
    7. Artist Statement
      1. Research artist statements online
      2. Develop ideas, content, and appropriate vocabulary to create a personal statement
    8. Health and Safety in the Painting Studio: Inhalation and Ingestion
      1. Pigments
      2. Mediums
      3. Toxins
      4. Solvents
    9. Exposure to Skin
      1. Proper disposal of materials
      2. Sink maintenance
      3. Easel maintenance
      4. Studio maintenance
      5. Paint storage maintenance
        1. Extending paint shelf-life
        2. Brush and tool maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2019
  
  •  

    ART 232 - Digital Photography II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 128 . Includes lighting, intermediate skills in digital workflow, critical analysis and visual literacy, and portfolio development. 

    Prerequisite(s): ART 128  
    Recommendation: Completion of DAR 221  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: The prerequisite may be waived with consent of the instructor. It is recommended students have access to a digital camera with manual exposure control and a computer with image processing software. Professional photographic equipment, including cameras, are available for check out on a rotating basis. Professional quality computers, software, printers, lighting equipment, and studio will be provided for specific assignments. There will be additional supply costs beyond course fees.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate studio and location lighting skills.
    2. Demonstrate intermediate skills in digital photographic workflow.
    3. Demonstrate ability in critical analysis and visual literacy.
    4. Create a conceptual series photographic portfolio.

    Outline:
    I.    Lighting 
        A.    Types of lighting
           1.   Ambient 
           2.   Quartz lights 
           3.    Strobe
           4.    Continuous lights
       B. Qualities of light 
          1. Direction
          2. Contrast
          3. Scale
          4.  Diffusion    

      C. Studio lighting techniques 
      D. Location lighting techniques
      E. Assignments demonstrating competency
    II. Intermediate Skills in Digital Workflow From Image Capture, Editing, and Printing 
        A. Pictorial effects of aperture and shutter speed 
        B. Lenses 
           1. Perspective
           2. Distortion
        C. Image manipulation and alteration
        D. Color management
        E.  Professional printers and characteristics
        F.   Paper profiles
        G.  Assignments demonstrating competency
    III. Intermediate Critical Analysis and Visual Literacy 
        A.  Group and individual critiques 
        B.  Written review of exhibition 
        C.  Role of photography in the diverse contemporary society including history and culture 
    IV. Portfolio Development 
        A.  Produce a final portfolio of fifteen images with technical, aesthetic, and conceptual unity and quality 
        B. Professional quality output to print 
     


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021

  
  •  

    ART 246 - Lighting for Photography II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 146 . Includes lighting and equipment for studio and location, advanced lighting qualities and techniques, photographing with mixed light sources, lighting for mood and environment, set design and construction, photographing individuals and groups of people, photographing on location, photographing for montage images, advanced image composition, critical analysis, business practices, and portfolios.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 146  
    Information: Students are strongly recommended to own or have access to a digital camera with manual exposure control and a computer with image processing software. Professional quality cameras, computers and software, printers, lighting equipment and studio will be provided for specific assignments. There may be additional supply costs in addition to course fees. 


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Use professional, continuous, strobe, and flash lighting equipment, professional studio equipment, and professional cameras and lenses with a high level of competency. 
    2. Demonstrate the control of light qualities, and their effect on rendering the subject, to create a sense of time, place, and mood. 
    3. Apply skills effectively in lighting a wide variety of subjects, including multiple people and/or objects in the same image, both in studio and on location. 
    4. Demonstrate advanced skill in image composition and visual literacy. 
    5. Explain basic business practices and marketing. 
    6. Produce a quality portfolio for entering the professional community, which demonstrate professional technical and aesthetic skills in lighting for photography. 

    Outline:
    1. Lighting and Studio Equipment for Studio and Location
    1. Types of strobe and flash light sources – use and safe handling
    2. Studio equipment – use and safe handling
    3. Location equipment – use and safe handling
    4. Incident flash meters
    5. Professional cameras and lenses
    6.    Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Advanced Lighting Qualities and Techniques
    1. Defining light qualities based on subject
    2. Direction, contrast, size and scale, diffusion
    3. Light controls, scrims, and gobos
    4. Color and color temperature
    5. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Photographing With Mixed Light Sources
    1. Color and quality
    2. Controlling balance and exposure
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Lighting for Mood and Environment
    1. Creating a sense of time and place
    2. Atmospheric perspective
    3. Symbolism of light qualities
    4. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Set Design and Construction
    1. Defining the setting and set
    2. Fabrication
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Photographing Individuals and Groups of People
    1. Lighting individuals
    2. Lighting groups
    3. Posing
    4. Organization
    5. Backgrounds and environments
    6.    Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Photographing on Location
    1. Logistics
    2. Using the environment
    3. Controlling light contrast and quality
    4. Ambient light as fill light
    5. Ambient light as key light
    6. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Photographing for Montaged Images
    1. Matching resolution and image quality
    2. Creating effective lighting
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Advanced Image Composition
    1. Elements of composition
    2. Photographic rendering
    3. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Critical Analysis
    1. Groups and individual critiques
    2. Discussions of photographic history and culture
    3. Written review of exhibition
    1. Business Practices
    1. Types of photographic businesses and opportunities
    2. Business forms and organization
    3. Marketing
    4. Assignments demonstrating competency
    1. Portfolios
    1. Types of portfolios
    2. Technical and aesthetic unity and quality
    3. Demonstrate competency and preparation to enter the professional community by producing a final portfolio of ten 8 ½ x 11 inch prints with technical and aesthetic unity and quality, and show professional skill with lighting and camera techniques


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/2022
  
  •  

    ART 249 - Artists’ Books

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the basics of the various styles of bookmaking. Includes historical and contemporary practices, bookbinding techniques, book styles, materials, text and image, unique and multiple edition book runs, and critique of artists’ books

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify historical progress of bookmaking.   
    2. Identify and create various binding processes.   
    3. Identify and create various book styles.
    4. Demonstrate the application of interdependence of text and image. 
    5. Demonstrate printing skills for images and text.
    6. Produce both unique and multiple edition books runs based on a creative, thematic approach.
    7. Participate in field trips, discussions and critiques.
    8. Engage in studio practices in both collaborative and individual creative bookmaking endeavors, with and without letterpress.

    Outline:
    1. Historical and Contemporary Practices
      1. Introduction to terminology
      2. Introduction to historical books and contemporary artist’s books
      3. Exploration of the book as a medium for artistic expression
      4. Contemporary artists of note
    2. Bookbinding Techniques
      1. Single and dual signature pamphlets
      2. Accordion
      3. Slipcovers
      4. Four-needle sewing method
      5. Coptic stitch and linked-stitch techniques
      6. Oriental side-stitching
    3. Book Styles
      1. Traditional book
      2. Altered book
      3. Sculptural book
      4. Adhesive and non-adhesive binding styles
    4. Materials
      1. Traditional
      2. Nontraditional
    5. Text and Image
      1. Separation of text and image
      2. Combining text and image/text as image
      3. Artistic expression
    6. Unique and Multiple Edition Book Runs
      1. Creative one-of-a-kind books
      2. Multiple run books in small editions
    7. Critique
      1. Research/critique artists books and artists book criticism
      2. Bibliography


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2011
  
  •  

    ART 250 - Gallery and Museum Practices

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to practices and procedures of galleries and museums. Includes preparation of resume and artist statement, create press release and exhibition announcement, exhibition preparation, photographing artwork, frame artwork for exhibition, gallery and museum administration, present a body of work, and market artwork.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 100  
    Recommendation: Consult instructor for alternative prerequisites.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Prepare a resume and artist statement.
    2. Compose a press release and design an exhibition announcement.
    3. Install an exhibition.
    4. Photograph artwork and prepare images/slides.
    5. Frame or prepare art for exhibition.
    6. Describe the daily workings of a gallery.
    7. Present a body of work for exhibition.
    8. Explain how to market work.

    Outline:
    1. Prepare a Resume and an Artist Statement
      1. Software and formatting
      2. Related experiences
      3. Artist statement about artwork
    2. Create Press Release and Exhibition Announcement
      1. Formatting and deadlines
      2. Design images and text: venue, dates, and credit/captions
      3. Outlets for media
    3. Exhibition Preparation
      1. Body of work
      2. Presentation
      3. Installation
    4. Photographing Artwork
      1. Proper preparation of artwork and environment for photographing artwork
      2. Resolutions for promotional materials/media
      3. Resources
      4. Agencies/representatives/commercial galleries vs. non-profit museums
    5. Frame Artwork for Exhibition
      1. Ready-mades vs. custom frames
      2. Fitting work to hang
      3. Display 3-D works
      4. Communicating with the curator and administration
    6. Gallery/Museum Administration
      1. Recite sequence of operations for galleries and museums
      2. Identify museum and gallery personnel responsibilities
      3. Participate in site visits
    7. Present a Body of Work for Exhibition
      1. Prepare information for labels: titles, media, and valuation
      2. Prepare materials for promotion: resume, statement, images
    8. Market Work
      1. Participate in exhibition reception(s)
      2. Discuss work verbally and in artist statement
      3. Identify media for marketing/exposure


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 260 - Ceramics II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 160 . Includes intermediate handbuilding techniques and methods of fabrication, wheel throwing and trimming, projects involving formal elements, intermediate ceramic techniques, reduction firing, raku firing, plaster press mold, ceramic artist research, and discussion and exploration topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 160  



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate closer attention on creative skills and the refinement of handbuilding techniques and other methods of fabrication at the intermediate level.
    2. Review and refine wheel throwing and trimming techniques.
    3. Complete several projects that involve a more in-depth analysis of the elements of scale, texture, form, and functionality.
    4. Produce ceramic art using intermediate techniques.
    5. Demonstrate the practice and application of chemical change through cone 10 reduction firing.
    6. Produce a raku fire piece using specified glazing and cooling reduction techniques and processes.
    7. Create and fire a plaster press mold and a cast by using clay slabs.
    8. Research, write, and present information on an individual ceramic artist.
    9. Discuss various topics related to the design, aesthetics, and history of ceramic art.

    Outline:
    1. Intermediate Handbuilding Techniques and Methods of Fabrication
      1. Pinch
      2. Coil
      3. Slab
    2. Wheel Throwing and Trimming
    3. Projects Involving Formal Elements
      1. Scale
      2. Texture
      3. Form
      4. Functionality
    4. Intermediate Ceramic Techniques
    1. Glazing
    1. Chemical change in oxidation
    2. Chemical change in reduction
    1. Firing temperatures

    V.    Cone 10 Reduction Firing

    1. Oxidation
    2. Reduction

    VI.    Raku Firing

    VII.   Plaster Press Mold

    VIII.  Ceramic Artist Research

    IX.    Ceramic Discussion/Exploration Topics

    1. Design
    2. Aesthetics
    3. History of ceramic art


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2012

  
  •  

    ART 261 - Ceramics III

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 260 . Includes intermediate and advanced handbuilding techniques and methods of fabrication, wheel throwing and trimming, projects involving formal elements, intermediate and advanced ceramic techniques, reduction firing, raku firing, plaster casting mold, ceramic artist research, and discussion and exploration topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 260  



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate closer attention on creative skills and the refinement of handbuilding techniques and other methods of fabrication at the intermediate and advanced levels.
    2. Review and refine wheel throwing and trimming techniques.
    3. Complete several projects that involve a more in-depth analysis of the elements of scale, texture, form, and functionality.
    4. Produce ceramic art using intermediate and advanced techniques.
    5. Demonstrate the practice and application of chemical change through cone 10 reduction firing.
    6. Produce a raku fire piece using specified glazing and cooling reduction techniques and processes.
    7. Create and fire a casting mold and a cast by using clay casting slips.
    8. Research, write, and present information on an individual ceramic artist.
    9. Discuss various topics related to the design, aesthetics, and history of ceramic art.

    Outline:
    1. Intermediate and Advanced Handbuilding Techniques and Methods of Fabrication
      1. Pinch
      2. Coil
      3. Slab
    2. Wheel Throwing and Trimming
    3. Projects Involving Formal Elements
      1. Scale
      2. Texture
      3. Form
      4. Functionality
    4. Intermediate and Advanced Ceramic Techniques
    1. Glazing
    1. Chemical change in oxidation
    2. Chemical change in reduction
    1. Firing temperatures

    V.    Cone 10 Reduction Firing

    1. Oxidation
    2. Reduction

    VI.    Raku Firing

    VII.   Plaster Casting Mold

    VIII.  Ceramic Artist Research

     

    IX.    Ceramic Discussion/Exploration Topics

    1. Design
    2. Aesthetics
    3. History of ceramic art


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/2019

  
  •  

    ART 262 - Ceramics IV

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 261 . Includes advanced handbuilding techniques and methods of fabrication, wheel throwing and trimming, projects involving formal elements, advanced ceramic techniques, reduction firing, raku firing, four test glazemaking, ceramic artist research, and discussion and exploration topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 261  



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate closer attention on creative skills and the refinement of handbuilding techniques and other methods of fabrication at the advanced level.
    2. Review and refine wheel throwing and trimming techniques.
    3. Complete several projects that involve a more in-depth analysis of the elements of scale, texture, form, and functionality.
    4. Produce ceramic art using advanced techniques.
    5. Demonstrate the practice and application of chemical change through cone 10 reduction firing.
    6. Produce a raku fire piece using specified glazing and cooling reduction techniques and processes.
    7. Find at least four interesting glaze recipes, mix and apply on the test tiles and on the students’ piece for reduction firing. 
    8. Research, write, and present information on an individual ceramic artist.
    9. Discuss various topics related to the design, aesthetics, and history of ceramic art.

    Outline:
    1. Advanced Handbuilding Techniques and Methods of Fabrication
      1. Pinch
      2. Coil
      3. Slab
    2. Wheel Throwing and Trimming
    3. Projects Involving Formal Elements
      1. Scale
      2. Texture
      3. Form
      4. Functionality
    4. Advanced Ceramic Techniques
    1. Glazing
    1. Chemical change in oxidation
    2. Chemical change in reduction
    1. Firing temperatures

    V.    Cone 10 Reduction Firing

    1. Oxidation
    2. Reduction

    VI.    Raku Firing

    VII.   Four Test Glazemaking

    VIII.  Ceramic Artist Research

     

    IX.    Ceramic Discussion/Exploration Topics

    1. Design
    2. Aesthetics
    3. History of ceramic art


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/2019

  
  •  

    ART 265 - Furnace Glassblowing I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Introduction to the elements, tools, and basic principles of furnace glassblowing. Includes the glassblowing studio and cold working shop orientation, paperweights and solid glass forms, the blowpipe, cold working glass, a final project, and visual literacy and critical analysis.

    Recommendation: Completion of ART 100  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. This course requires a substantial special fee through Sonoran Glass School. Please contact the Arts, Communications and Humanities Division at the West Campus (206-6974) for further information.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the basic concept of furnace glassblowing and create elementary solid and blown glass objects.
    2. Explain the basic principles and basic steps involved, including proper equipment use and safety precautions.
    3. Describe basic tools, equipment and their proper uses, including safe tool use and precautions.
    4. Distinguish between and utilize basic coloration techniques.
    5. Discuss an overview of related glass art disciplines.
    6. Demonstrate basic glass cold working techniques including grinding, polishing, annealing principles and basic glass chemistry.

    Outline:
    1. Glassblowing Studio and Cold Working Shop Orientation
      1. Health and safety issues
      2. Tool and equipment uses
      3. Glass material and furnace processes
      4. Teamwork
      5. Sketchbook
    2. Paperweights and Solid Glass Forms
      1. Gathering hot glass
      2. Shaping hot glass
      3. Introducing color – forms and safety issues
      4. Application techniques
      5. Molds
    3. The Blowpipe
      1. Initial bubble
      2. Second gather
      3. Integration of color techniques/forms
      4. Blown vessels – shape and intent
      5. Glass wraps

     

     

    1. Cold Working Glass
      1. Grinding
      2. Polishing
      3. Facets
      4. Masking
      5. Sandblasting
      6. Cutting
      7. Annealing
      8. Chemistry
    2. Final Project
    3. Visual Literacy and Critical Analysis
      1. Individual and group critiques
      2. Varied techniques
      3. Sketchbook
      4. Participation in student art show


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017

  
  •  

    ART 266 - Furnace Glassblowing II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 265 . Includes a review of the glassblowing studio and cold working shop orientation, advanced techniques with hollow and solid glass forms, continued development of blowpipe skills, refinement of cold working glass methods, final project, and visual literacy and critical analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 265  
    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. This course requires a substantial special fee through Sonoran Glass School. Please contact the Arts, Communications and Humanities Division at the West Campus (206-6974) for further information.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate advanced concepts of furnace glassblowing and create with consistency solid and blown glass objects.
    2. Explain and demonstrate the continued development of principles and steps involved in glassblowing, including proper equipment use and safety precautions.
    3. Describe tools, equipment and their proper uses, including safe tool use and precautions.
    4. Distinguish between and utilize continued advanced coloration techniques.
    5. Discuss an overview of additional related glass art disciplines.
    6. Demonstrate continuing glass cold working techniques including grinding, polishing, annealing principles, and glass chemistry.

    Outline:
    1. Review – Glassblowing Studio and Cold Working Shop Orientation
      1. Health and safety issues
      2. Tool and equipment uses
      3. Glass material and furnace processes
      4. Teamwork
      5. Sketchbook
    2. Advanced Techniques With Hollow and Solid Glass Forms
      1. Gathering hot glass
      2. Shaping hot glass
      3. Continue color application – forms and safety issues review
      4. Application techniques
      5. Molds
    3. Continued Development of Blowpipe Skills
      1. Initial bubble
      2. Second gather
      3. Integration of color techniques/forms (drops)
      4. Blown Vessels – shape and intent
      5. Glass wraps, handle, spouts
    4. Refinement of Cold Working Glass Methods
      1. Grinding
      2. Polishing
      3. Facets
      4. Masking
      5. Sandblasting
      6. Cutting
      7. Annealing
      8. Chemistry
    5. Final Project
    6. Visual Literacy and Critical Analysis
      1. Individual and group critiques
      2. Varied techniques
      3. Sketchbook
      4. Artistic integration
      5. Participation in student art show


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017
  
  •  

    ART 270 - Metalwork II: Jewelry

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of ART 170 . Includes design approaches to jewelry making, review of various intermediate techniques, functional considerations involved in jewerly design, and safety and health issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 170  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate closer attention to design skills and discussion of contemporary and historical jewelry/metalwork.
    2. Demonstrate intermediate level jewelry techniques.
    3. Demonstrate close attention to functional limitations and aesthetic considerations in the area of jewelry design, both contemporary and historical. 
    4. Demonstrate, describe, and apply safety and health procedures related to materials, tools, and equipment.

    Outline:
    1. Detailed Information and Background on Historical and Contemporary Metalwork   
      1. Metal works from antiquity including decorative, ritual, and functional objects
      2. 20th Century developments in materials and design
      3. Effect of digital techniques on contemporary metalworks and jewelry
      4. Intermediate Instruction in Use of Tools and Equipment
    1. Casting
    2. Wire techniques
    3. Hollow form fabrication
    4. Die fabrication
      1. Intermediate Instruction in Functional Aspects of Jewelry Making
    1. Experimentation, limits, and possibilities
    2. New material explorations
      1. Instruction in All Aspects of Safety and Health Procedures
    1. Personal protective equipment
    2. Equipment procedures
    3. Lab hygiene and waste disposal procedures
    4. Health and safety in the home studio


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/2021
  
  •  

    ART 289 - Portfolio Capstone

    1 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    .5 lecture periods 1.5 lab periods

    Assembly and production of a professional quality portfolio of the student’s own artwork with a focus on personal creativity and a coherent presentation. Includes review of assembly of portfolio materials, presentation of artwork, presentation of ideas and concepts, and a final capstone portfolio review.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. A minimum grade of C is required to complete this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Assemble, curate, and document artwork for a portfolio that exhibits both technical competency and a conceptual perspective that reflect their interests and creativity.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect, discuss, and articulate both verbally and in written form the relationship of their own artwork and perspective in a global and creative context.

    Outline:
    1. Review and Assembly of Portfolio Materials
    1. Selecting and curating work for presentation
    2. Discussion of client expectations and purpose of portfolio
    3. Professional presentational standards
    4. Building, formatting, and organizing a resume
    1. Presentation of Artwork
    1. Photographing and/or scanning of artwork
    2. Formatting artwork for presentation
    3. Investigating traditional exhibition options
    4. Investigating digital and social media exhibition options
    1. Presentation of Ideas and Concepts
    1. Investigating conceptual, historical, and global connections relating to one’s own perspective and inspirations
    2. Organizing creative ideas
    3. Writing and editing an Artist Statement
    4. Assembling a coherent oral presentation of one’s artwork
    1. Final Capstone Portfolio Review
    1. Oral presentation
    2. Final faculty critique of artwork, artist’s statement, checklist, resume/CV, and an electronic version of the portfolio in a Power Point, web, or social media format.


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/2019
  
  •  

    ART 296I1 - Independent Study in ART: Art History

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in art history. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Develop and expand ideas and approaches studied in previous art courses and incorporate these concepts into the specified project.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I2 - Independent Study in ART: Ceramics

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in ceramics. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.  
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Demonstrate the practice and application of chemical changes through cone 10 reduction firing.
    7. Produce a raku fire piece using specified glazing and cooling reduction techniques and processes.
    8. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline.
    9. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2012
  
  •  

    ART 296I3 - Independent Study in ART: Metals

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in metals. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline. 
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I4 - Independent Study in ART: Painting, Drawing, and Design

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in painting, drawing, and design. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline. 
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I5 - Independent Study in ART: Photography

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in photography. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply photography knowledge and skills by using individually or combine traditional, digital, and/or alternative processes in image making.    
    2. Demonstrate written and verbal analytical skills through critique and self-reflection.     
    3. Produce a new body of individualized work.    

    Outline:

    Content to be determined by the student and instructor. 


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020
  
  •  

    ART 296I6 - Independent Study in ART: Printmaking

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in printmaking. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline. 
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:

    Content to be determined by the student and instructor. 


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I7 - Independent Study in ART: Sculpture

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in sculpture. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline. 
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:

    Content to be determined by the student and instructor. 


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I8 - Independent Study in ART: Fibers

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in fibers. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.  
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline. 
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016
  
  •  

    ART 296I9 - Independent Study in ART: Glass

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Advanced projects in glass. Content to be determined by conference between student and instructor.

    Information: Consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken four times for a maximum of twelve credit hours. If this course is repeated see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate. This course requires a substantial special fee through Sonoran Glass Art Academy. Please contact the Arts, Communications and Humanities Division at the West Campus (206-6974) for further information.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify areas of individual study.   
    2. Develop objectives which delineate the art project/assignment.   
    3. Demonstrate additional knowledge and creativity in the specific art area selected. 
    4. Develop a series of activities which meet the objectives of the project. 
    5. Produce a body of work which represents at least seventy-five hours of studio time.
    6. Develop and expand skills and techniques acquired in previous courses in the chosen discipline.
    7. Explore ideas and approaches studied in previous courses and incorporate these concepts into specified projects.

    Outline:
    Content to be determined by the student and instructor.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2016