Jan 23, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Legend for Courses

HC/HN: Honors Course  IN/IH: Integrated lecture/lab  LB: Lab  LC: Clinical Lab  LS: Skills Lab  WK: Co-op Work
SUN#: is a prefix and number assigned to certain courses that represent course equivalency at all Arizona community colleges and the three public universities. Learn more at www.aztransfer.com/sun.

 

Computer Information Systems

  
  •  

    CIS 103 - Microsoft Windows Operating System Professional Admin

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Fundamental skills necessary to perform day-to-day administration tasks in a Microsoft Windows operating system. Includes windows network administration, windows operating system, user and group accounts, network resource security, print server administration, resource and event audits, and resource monitoring.

    Information: This course helps prepare students to take the Microsoft Windows 10 exam.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate use of Windows administrative tools.
    2. Manage a Windows operating system.
    3. Manage user and group accounts.
    4. Organize network resources using share and New Technology File System (NTFS) permissions.
    5. Demonstrate how to implement windows security controls.
    6. Configure Windows networking.
    7. Monitor resources.

    Outline:
    1. Windows Network Administration Overview
      1. Operating system editions
      2. Directory services
      3. Administrative tasks and tools
    2. Windows Operating System
      1. Deploying Windows
      2. Post-installation configuration
      3. Over-the-network installation
      4. Unattended installation
      5. Distributions server
      6. Microsoft Management Console (MMC)
      7. Managing Services
      8. Configuring the local registry
      9.        Implement local policy
      10.        Troubleshooting startup/boot process
    3. User and Group Accounts
      1. Planning and creating user accounts
      2. Creating user profiles
      3. Planning and creating local groups
      4. Implementing account policies and user account control (UAC)
    4. Networking 
      1. Client IP configuration 
      2. Wireless connectivity
      3. VPN configuration
      4. Remote desktop management
    5. System Secuirty
      1. Guidelines for  share permission
      2. Guidelines for NTFS permissions
      3. Configuring NTFS and share permissions
      4. Windows Defender Firewall
      5. Encryption
    6. Print Server Administration
      1. Setting up a network print server and client
      2. Configuring a printer
      3. Managing printers
      4. Identifying and troubleshooting printing problems
    7. Resource and Event Audits
      1. Planning and implementing the audit policy
      2. Auditing folders, files, and printers
      3. Using event viewer to view the security log
    8. Resource Monitoring
      1. Viewing user sessions
      2. Monitoring resources in use
      3. Setting alerts and sending messages


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 104 - Computer Fundamentals

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Introduction to computer information systems. Includes hardware, system software, networks, and threats posed by malicious software and web sites. Also includes the social and economic effects of information, using the Internet to do research, and productivity application software.

    Recommendation: Completion of CSA 089  or basic computer and keyboard skills, completion of REA 091  or satisfactory score on the reading assessment test before enrolling in this course.
    Gen-Ed: Meets CTE - OTHER.


      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proficiency with productivity application software – Word, Excel PowerPoint and Access.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of operating system basics especially using the Windows interface, and using Windows Explorer/File Explorer to to manage and organize files and folders.
    3. Interpret information by selecting and analyzing information from the Internet appropriate to task.
    4. Critically evaluate the information retrieved from the Internet for relevancy and accuracy.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the various threats to privacy, safety, and security a user may encounter on the Internet.
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of ethical and environmental issues related to using computers and information technology.
    7. Demonstrate sufficient knowledge of computer hardware components to evaluate systems for personal use.
    8. Discuss the impact of Information Technology and the Internet on society and the economy.
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of the equipment needed and installation procedures required for setting up a home network.

    Outline:

    I.    Windows Interface

    A.   Use Windows desktop icons and menus to launch applications.

    B.   Use Taskbar to identify active applications and switch between them.

    C.   Use Windows Explorer/File Explorer to manage and organize files and folders.

    II.   Business Application Tools - Word

    A.   Editing and formatting

    B.   Importing/Inserting

    1.  Pictures

    2.  Excel Charts

    3.  Tables

    C.   Creating and modifying

    1.  Styles

    2.  Table of content

    III.  Business Application Tools - Excel

    A.   Create, edit and format spreadsheets

    B.   Create and modify formulas using absolute, mixed and relative cell reference

    C.   Use Excel functions

    D.   Create and modify charts

    IV.  Business Application Tools - Access

    A.   File management

    B.   Create, design, normalize, join tables

    C.   Enter, update, delete, filter and sort data

    D.   Generate reports

    V.   Business Application Tools - PowerPoint

    A.   Create

    1.   Slideshows

    2.   Templates and master slides

    3.   Outlines

    B.   Modify

    1.   Slideshows

    2.   Templates

    3.   Outlines

    C. Import/insert

    1.   Pictures

    2.   Graphs

    3.   Slides

    VI.  Other topics

    A.  Internet Fundamentals

    1.   Performing web-based research using search engines

    2.   Select and analyze information retrieved from searches

    3.   Critically evaluate of Internet information

    4.   Cite Internet sources

    B.   Privacy, security and safety

    1.   Threats and defenses against them

    2.   Internet fraud

    C.   Ethical and Environmental issues

    1.   Intellectual property rights

    2.   Responsible email and social media behavior

    3.   Using energy efficient equipment

    4.   Disposing of equipment in an environmentally safe manner

    D.   Hardware

    1.   High level view of the basics: CPU, RAM, input and output devices, etc.

    2.   Become an informed consumer: match computing devices with your needs.

    E.   Social and economic effects of Information Technology and the Internet

         1.   New jobs created

    2.   Old jobs destroyed

    F.   Home Networks

      1.   Equipment needed

      2.   Securing your network against threats


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/2022
  
  •  

    CIS 119 - Network Essentials

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Comprehensive introduction to computer networks and data communications. Includes computer networks and services, transmission media and connection, network models, popular protocol suites, other network issues, and network operating systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 136  
    Recommendation: Completion of CIS 103  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: This course may help in the preparation for the CompTIA Network+ exam.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify network and internetwork connectivity devices.
    2. Describe key network protocols and standards.
    3. Implement network security standards and protocols.
    4. Use network devices to segment network traffic.
    5. Evaluate solutions to common networking problems.
    6. Explain the elements of network management.

    Outline:
    1. Networking concepts
      1. Common ports, protocols and services
      2. OSI Model
      3. Routing and switching
      4. IP addressing
        1. Address assignments
        2. Subnetting
        3. Private and reserved addresses
    2. Network topologies
    3. Wireless
    1. 802.11 standards
    2. Cellular
      1. Cloud concepts
    1. Infrastructure
      1. Cabling
        1. Common media types
        2. Connectors and transceivers
        3. Cable and ethernet standards
    2. Topology of network devices
    3. Advanced networking devices
    4. Virtualization
    1. Virtual network devices
    2. Network storage devices
      1. WAN technologies
    1. Network operations
    1. Documentation and diagramming
    2. Business continuity and disaster recovery
    3. Remote access
    1. Network security
    1. Physical security devices
    2. Authentication and access control
    3. Wireless security
    4. Common network attacks
    5. Network device hardening and mitigation techniques
    6. Troubleshooting and tools


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 120 - Computer Applications for Business [SUN# CIS 1120]

    4 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Introduction to computer information systems and applications with an emphasis on Microsoft applications, especially Microsoft Excel. Students will develop an awareness of the critical thinking, quantitative analysis and qualitative assessment skills that serve as the foundation for the effective and ethical use of information as part of an informed business or personal decision.

    Prerequisite(s): Within the last three years: C or better in MAT 092  or higher or satisfactory score on the mathematics assessment exam.
    Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - OTHER; Meets CTE - OTHER.




    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate problem solving using application software, and the Internet.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency with spreadsheet software (Microsoft Excel) to solve business problems. This proficiency will be demonstrated by multiple lab assignments which will focus on business problem solving with an emphasis on analysis techniques, algorithmic design, and implementation.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency with using visual presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), word processing documents (Microsoft Word) and database management software (Microsoft Access) to organize, present and store business solutions and information.
    4. Use the Internet to research and analyze information and data in case studies.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency in building a basic Web page.
    6. Discuss laws and ethics related to computer use.
    7. Discuss network topology and security; explain the Internet effect on the globalization of business and social networks from the perspective of business.

    Outline:
    1. Business Application Tools -Excel
      1. Create, edit and format spreadsheets
      2. Create and modify formulas using absolute, mixed and relative cell reference
      3. Use Excel functions
      4. Create and modify charts
      5. Name cells and ranges
      6. Table management
        1. Sort
        2. Filter
        3. Import data
      7. Database functions
      8. Create, refresh, and delete
        1. Pivot tables
        2. Pivot charts
      9. Business problem solving
        1. Analysis of problems
        2. Critical thinking
        3. Design of charts, and tables to highlight business information
        4. Analysis of existing data represented in excel
    2. Business Application Tools -Access
      1. File management
      2. Create, design, normalize, join tables
      3. Design, manage, filter, sort data
      4. Query using Structured Query Language (SQL)
      5. Report generation
      6. Pivot table
      7. Chart
    3. Business Application Tools -Word
      1. Editing and formatting
      2. Importing/Inserting
        1. Pictures
        2. Excel Charts
        3. Tables
      3. Creating and modifying
        1. Styles
        2. Table of content
        3. Index
      4. Labels and mailers for business literature
    4. Business Application Tools -PowerPoint
      1. Create
        1. Slideshows
        2. Templates and master slides
        3. Outlines
      2. Modify
        1. Slideshows
        2. Templates
        3. Outlines
      3. Importing/inserting
        1. pictures
        2. graphs
        3. slides
    5. Other topics
    1. Network Security and data integrity
    2. Information systems role in business
    3. Research using the Internet
    4. Planning and implementing technology solutions  
    5. Ethics
    6. Social Networking as a business tool
    7. Internet Security
    1. Viruses and malware
    2. Internet fraud
    3. Spam
    4. Identify theft
    5. Intellectual property rights
    6. Privacy
    1. Internet Case studies
      1. E-Commerce
      2. Principles of e-commerce
      3. Effect on business
      4. Cloud computing
      5. Social and ethical issues  


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    CIS 121 - Web Publishing

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to website design using the most current versions of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), JavaScript and Cascading Style Sheet (CSS). Includes PHP programming language, database access, JQuery, asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX), web forms, HTML standards, web design, sessions and cookies.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Create web pages using HTML and CSS
    2. Describe functions of web and database servers
    3. Develop beginning PHP programs and JavaScripts for dynamic web design
    4. Explain how existing PHP programs and JavaScripts are used in dynamic web design
    5. Demonstrate multimedia web functionality using the most current HTML

    Outline:
    1. Basics of web development
      1. Role of the operating system
      2. Web servers
      3. Database (DB) servers
      4. Programming language paradigms
      5. Basics of HTML
    2. PHP programming
      1. Fundamentals of programming with PHP
      2. Embedding PHP in HTML scripts
      3. Basics of Object Oriented Programing (OOP) with PHP
    3. MySQL
      1. Basics of DB administration
      2. Accessing MySQL with PHP
    4. Web forms
    5. Cookies and sessions
    6. JavaScript
      1. Basics of JavaScript
      2. Introduction to JQuery
      3. Introduction to AJAX
    7. CSS
      1. Basics of CSS
      2. Accessing CSS with JavaScript
    8. HTML and mutimedia


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2016
  
  •  

    CIS 129 - Programming and Problem Solving I

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to personal and business computer systems. Includes components of a computer system; advantages and disadvantages of programming languages; traditional
    languages, native code and object-oriented concepts; source code versus executable code; and data structures and data representation. Also includes language statements; expressions
    components; control structures; problem-solving techniques; program test data, debugging and termination; and solving simple problems and creating programs.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT 095  or MAT 097  or concurrent enrollment, through Module 35 in MAT 089A  or MAT 089B , or placement into MAT 151 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Develop programs using control structures.
    2. Develop programs using repetition structures.
    3. Design programs using arrays/lists.
    4. Create programs, using functions to solve problems.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to use object-oriented concepts such as encapsulation, constructors, methods, and properties

    Outline:
    1. Components of a Computer System
      1. Types of computers
      2. Hardware
        1. CPU
        2. Input/output devices
        3. Storage
        4. Memory
        5. Computer codes and numeric representation – simple conversions
    2. Advantages and Disadvantages of Programming Languages
      1. Machine code
      2. Low level programming languages, assemblers, assembly languages
    3. Overview of Traditional Interpreted and Compiled
      1. C and C++
      2. Java
      3. Python
    4. Source Code Versus Executable Code
      1. Language interpreters (run-time translators)
      2. Assemblers (1-to-1 translators)
      3. Compilers (1-to-N translators)
    5. Data Structures and Data Representation
      1. Variables
        1. Global
        2. Local
      2. Elementary data types
        1. Character
        2. String
        3. Integer
        4. Floating
        5. Boolean
      3. Identify and explain the difference between:
        1. Data types
        2. Memory addresses
        3. Variables types
        4. Literals
        5. Constants
        6. Number base systems (binary, decimal and hexadecimal)
        7. Floating point
        8. Decimal data representation
        9. Direct addressing
        10. Relative addressing
      4. Identify and explain structured data types and data abstraction 
        1. File
        2. Record
        3. Array/list
          1. Single dimension
          2. Multidimensional
    6. Language Statements
      1. Computer language statements, syntax, and semantics
      2. Input/output statements
      3. Assignment statements
      4. Elementary language statements and structured language statement
        1. Assignment and unconditional statements
        2. Selection and looping statements
    7. Expressions Components
      1. Operators, operands, and results
        1. Unary
        2. Binary
      2. Simple types
        1. Arithmetic
        2. Logical
        3. Relational
      3. Result
        1. Unconditional (not Boolean)
        2. Conditional (Boolean)
          1. True
          2. False
    8. Control Structures
      1. Three basic control structures and their sub-constructs
      2. Sequence
      3. Selection (Decision, If Then/Else) – case statement available in some languages
      4. Repetition (Looping, Iteration) – for statement available in some languages
    9. Problem Solving Techniques
      1. Top-down design – unitizing a problem into modules
        1. Step-wise refinement of modules
        2. Control modules
        3. Process modules
      2. Cohesion and coupling concept
      3. Systems and program mapping tools
        1. System flow
        2. Structure chart
        3. Detail program logic
      4. Program hierarchy – tracing design output to its source
        1. Input data
        2. Algorithm
      5. Elementary program design structure model
        1. Setup
        2. Process
        3. Wrap-up
      6. Solving simple problems using algorithms and a program design language
        1. Flowcharting
        2. Pseudo code
      7. Translating Pseudo Code into Python
      8. Program Test Data and Termination
      9. Program test data
        1. Limits/range testing
        2. Max/min data type testing
        3. Logic (selection) testing all paths
      10. Program errors
        1. Design errors
        2. Syntax compilation errors
        3. Semantic run-time errors
      11. Program termination and return codes
        1. Normal termination
        2. Abnormal program termination
        3. Return codes and use of return codes
    10. Desk Checking and Debugging
      1. Desk check on paper
      2. Breakpoint
      3. Step into
      4. Step over
      5. Variable watch
    11. Solve Simple Problems and Create Programs Using Java, Python, or C#
      1. Solve simple problem into PDL
        1. Keyboard data entry to print, keyboard entry to array/list, and array/list to print
        2. Arithmetic calculations, counters, accumulators
        3. Cross footing and accumulator totaling
        4. Conditional statements
        5. Boolean expressions
        6. Print using:
          1. Unformatted output
          2. Formatted output
          3. Report headings
          4. Report footers
      2. Translate the PDL into code
      3. Test the program code
      4. Debug the program
    12. Explain Object-Oriented Concepts such as Encapsulation, Constructors, Methods, and Properties
      1. Object-oriented programming
      2. Objects
      3. Methods
      4. Properties
      5. Private
      6. Public
      7. Constructors
      8. Encapsulation


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 131 - Programming and Problem Solving II

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of CIS 129 . Includes data structures and data representation, complex problem solving, procedural abstraction, and complex arrays with structured elements. Also includes object oriented programming, exception handling, file input and output, debugging, and testing.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 129  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Build data structures and data representation.
    2. Develop programs that read input from data files and build new output data files.
    3. Build programs that use recursion to solve simple problems.
    4. Solve complex problems and create programs.
    5. Design programs using sorting and searching algorithms in arrays.
    6. Create Object Oriented Programs with several levels of inheritance, constructors and destructors.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Review data structures and data representation.
    2. Discuss procedural abstraction.
    3. Create parameter passing with procedures and functions.
    4. Develop programs that read input from data files.
    5. Produce programs that build new output data files.
    6. Design programs that add records to existing output data files.
    7. Produce programs that add and update records in binary typed files.
    8. Solve complex problems and create programs.
    9. Design programs using sorting and searching algorithms in arrays.
    10. Create Object Oriented Programs with several levels of inheritance, several constructors and destructors.
    11. Create programs with several instances of exception handling.
    12. Develop a test plan.
    13. Troubleshoot a problem using debugging methods.
    14. Create programs using complex arrays with structured elements.

    Outline:
    1. Revisit Data Structures and Data Representation
      1. Elementary data types
        1. Character
        2. String
        3. Integer
        4. Real
        5. Boolean
      2. Structured data types and data abstraction
        1. File
        2. Record
        3. Array
          1. Single dimension
          2. Multidimensional
    2. Procedural Abstraction
      1. Procedure code module
        1. Statement extension
        2. Actions upon objects
      2. Recursion
    3. Data Files
      1. Reading input from data files
      2. Building new output data files
      3. Adding to existing output data files
      4. Adding and random updating of data records in binary typed data files
    4. Object Oriented Programming
      1. Creating complex classes using abstract classes, inheritance and composition
      2. Creating overloaded methods, constructors and destructors
      3. Data encapsulation
    5. Exception Handling
      1. Creating programs using simple exception handling, propagation
      2. Using generic and specific try-catch blocks
      3. Using “finally block”
    6. Debugging and Testing
      1. Creating test data using black box, white box, robustness testing methods
        1. Creating a test plan
        2. Boundary conditions
      2. Program debugging
        1. Creating a program which can be debugged
        2. Using concepts such as step into, step over, breakpoints, run and continue
        3. Troubleshooting a problem to pinpoint error
      3. Document program
    7. Complex Arrays with Structured Elements
      1. Sorting
      2. Searching
      3. Divide and conquer algorithms
      4. Solving complex problems/create programs using C# or Java
      5. Introducing complexity: best case, worst case, and average case
      6. Solving problems in pseudocode and/or flowcharts
        1. Input file data to print, input file data to array and sort array, array to print
        2. Translating the pseudocode/flowchart into code


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 132 - Introduction to Computer Forensics

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to computer forensics which focuses on methods of detection and prevention of computer crime. Includes multidisciplinary nature of computer forensics; professional opportunities; computer investigations; operating systems introduction; the investigator’s office and laboratory; forensic tools; and digital evidence controls. Also includes processing crime and incident scenes; data acquisition; computing forensic analysis; e-mail investigations; recovering image files; investigative report writing; and expert witness testimony.

    Recommendation: Basic knowledge of computers and how to download and install software is recommended before enrolling in this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the components and important areas of computer forensics.
    2. Relate the applicability of computer forensics to a variety of disciplines.
    3. Discuss important events and the laws relating to cybercrime.
    4. Compare basic computer operating systems, what they do, where and how they are used, and discuss some of their security shortcomings.
    5. Evaluate methods used in the collection and analysis of data.
    6. Demonstrate software in the recovery of computer files and data.
    7. Discuss the details of various types of computer attacks and how to prevent them (e.g., spyware,      MAC address spoofing, virus types).
    8. Critique expert witness testimony.

    Outline:
    1. Multidisciplinary Nature of Computer Forensics
    2. Professional Opportunities in Computer Forensics
    3. Introduction to Computer Investigations
      1. Preparing an investigation
      2. Systematic approach
      3. Gathering and analyzing data
      4. Completing and critiquing the case
    4. Operating Systems Introduction
      1. The boot sequence and tasks
      2. Methods of disk partitioning
      3. Examining data
      4. Understanding boot tasks
    5. Operating Systems Introduction to Macintosh
      1. Understanding the Macintosh file structure
      2. Macintosh boot tasks
    6. Operating Systems Introduction to Linux
      1. Boot processes
      2. Unix/Linux file structure
      3. Examining disks
    7. Introduction to Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
      1. IP packets
      2. IP addressing
      3. Media Access Control (MAC) addresses
      4. IP and MAC address shortcomings
    8. The Investigator’s Office and Laboratory
      1. Forensic lab certification requirements
      2. Certification/training requirements
      3. Physical layout of a forensics lab
      4. Forensics workstation hardware and software
    9. Introduction to Computer Forensic Tools
      1. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) tools
      2. National Institute of Justice (NIJ) methods
      3. Command-line software tools
      4. Graphical User Interface (GUI) software tools
      5. Hardware tools
    10. Digital Evidence Controls
      1. Identifying and understanding digital evidence
      2. Processing and handling of digital evidence
    11. Processing Crime and Incident Scenes
      1. Concepts and terms in warrants
      2. Securing a scene
      3. Sample investigations
    12. Data Acquisition
      1. Determining the Best Acquisition Methods
      2. Disk Operating System (DOS) tools
      3. Windows tools
      4. Linux tools
    13. Computer Forensic Analysis
      1. Using DriveSpy software to analyze computer data
      2. Using PDBlock and PDWipe software
      3. Using AccessData’s Forensic Toolkit
      4. Data hiding techniques
    14. E-Mail Investigations
      1. IP protocols and email
      2. Understanding the client and server roles in email
      3. Email crimes and investigation
    15. Recovering Image Files
      1. Image file types
      2. Locating and recovering image files
    16. Investigative Report Writing
      1. Types of reports
      2. Report layout
    17. Expert Witness Testimony
      1. Preparing for testimony
      2. Testifying in court
      3. Testifying during cross-examination
      4. Depositions


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019
  
  •  

    CIS 133 - Fundamentals of Personal Computer Security

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to Personal Computer (PC) security and how to protect from outside threats. Includes an overview of cyber crime and security issues; networks and the Internet; assessing a personal computer system; denial of service attacks; malware; basics of securing a PC system; and data encryption. Also includes Internet fraud and security; examples of espionage in cyberspace; cyber detective work; and computer security hardware and software.

    Recommendation: Completion of CIS 104 /CSA 104  and familiarity with the Internet are recommended before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the various types of computer virus attacks.
    2. Install appropriate software tools on personal computers (PC) to foil attacks.
    3. Discuss the use of Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and Transmission Control Protocol/User Datagram Protocol (TCP/UDP) ports.
    4. Discuss the basic aspects of securing a personal computer system.
    5. Install and use appropriate software tools to monitor activity.
    6. Discuss fraud and cyber crime topics of importance.
    7. Discuss encryption of data and the importance of encryption.

    Outline:
    1. Overview of Cyber Crime and Security Issues
    2. Networks and the Internet
      1. Open System Interconnection (OSI) model
      2. Internet Protocol (IP) addressing and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ports
      3. Basic network tools and their use
    3. Assessing a Personal Computer System
    4. Denial of Service Attacks
    5. Malware
      1. How viruses work
      2. Trojan horses
      3. Spyware
      4. Detecting and eliminating viruses and spyware
    6. Basics of Securing a Personal Computer System
      1. Shutting down a service in Windows
      2. Installing a firewall
      3. Safe Web surfing
    7. Data Encryption
      1. Introduction to data encryption
      2. Cryptography basics
      3. Modern methods of encryption
    8. Internet Fraud and Security
      1. Fraudulent offers and advice
      2. Online identify theft
      3. Protecting against cyber crime
      4. Securing browser settings for Internet browser programs
    9. Examples of Espionage in Cyberspace
    10. Cyber Detective Work
      1. Court records and criminal checks
      2. General searches
    11. Computer Security Hardware and Software
      1. Virus scanning software
      2. Firewalls
      3. Anti-spyware software
      4. Intrusion detection software


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    CIS 136 - Computer Hardware Components

    3 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Skills and abilities required to support PC hardware, software and peripherals, mobile device hardware, networking and troubleshooting hardware, and network connectivity issues.   Configure operating systems including Windows, iOS, Android, MacOS and Linux. Also includes security and the fundamentals of cloud computing.

    Information: This course may help in the preparation for the Comp TIA A+ certification examination.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify issues with computing devices including desktop PCs; mobile devices, printers, and network devices.
    2. Identify security vulnerabilities for devices and their network connections.
    3. Describe and configure peripheral devices.

    Outline:
    1. Hardware
    1. Configure BIOS/UEFI
    2. Components and types of motherboards
    3. RAM types and uses
    4. Expansion boards
      1.  Video cards
      2.  Networking cards
      3.  Storage cards
    5. Storage Devices
    1.  Optical drives
    2.  Magnetic media
    3.  SSD
    4.  Hot-swappable drives
    5.  RAID types
    6.  Tape drives
    1. CPU
    1. Types
    2. Speeds
    3. Features
    4. Cooling
    1. Interfaces
      1. USB
        1. SATA
        2. Firewire
        3. Wireless
    2. Bluetooth
    3. IR
    4. NFC
      1. Video
      2. Adapters and converters
    5. Power supplies
    1. Connectors
    2. Specifications
    1. Displays
    1. LCD
    2. Plasma
    3. Projector
    4. LED
    5. Specifications
    1. Peripherals
      1. Prints
    1. Laser
    2. Inkjet
    3. Thermal
    4. Impact
      1. Speakers
      2. Scanners
      3. Biometric devices
      4. Webcam
    1. Networking
    1. Cables and connectors
    1. Fiber
    2. Twisted pair
    3. Coax
    1. Basic TCP/IP
    1. IPv4 vs IPv6
    2. Subnets
    3. DHCP and ARP
    4. Gateway
    1. Common TCP/UDP protocols and ports
    2. WiFi
    1. Standards
    2. Encryption
    1. Internet Connection Types
    1. DSL
    2. Cable
    3. Fiber
    4. Dial-up
    5. Satelite
    1. Devices
    1. Hub
    2. Switch
    3. Router
    4. Access Point
    5. Modem
    6. Firewall
    7. Wireless repeaters
    8. Power over ethernet
    9. Ethernet over power
    1. Mobile Devices
    1. Laptop hardware and components
    2. Laptop specific features
    1. Special function keys
    2. Docking stations
    3. Locking cables
    1. Characteristics of other mobile devices
    1. Smartphones and tables
    2. eReader
    3. Wearable technology
    4. GPS
    1. Connection types
    1. Lightning
    2. Bluetooth
    3. USB
    4. NFC
    5. IR
    1. Hardware and Network Troubleshooting
    1. Desktop PC hardware issues
    2. RAID arrays and hard drives
    3. Video and projector display issues
    4. Wired and wireless networks
    5. Printing issues
    6. Mobile device issues


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 137 - Introduction to the Linux Operating System

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Configure, install, upgrade, and maintain Linux systems using industry standards and procedures. Includes management of users and groups, files, processes, monitoring, troubleshooting and other common Linux system administration tasks.

    Information: Configure, install, upgrade, and maintain Linux systems using industry standards and procedures. Includes management of users and groups, files, processes, monitoring, troubleshooting and other common Linux system administration tasks.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Manage files from command line
    2. Manage local users and groups
    3. Monitor and manage Linux processes
    4. Control services and daemons
    5. Control access to files
    6. Install and update software packages
    7. Manage Linux networking

    Outline:
    I.           Using the command line

    A.         Log into a Linux system and run simple commands using the shell.

    B.         Copy, move, create, delete, and organize files while working from a shell.

    C.         Manage text files from command output or in a text editor.

    II.          Managing security

    A.         Create, manage, and delete local users and groups.

    B.         Set Linux file system permissions on files and interpret the security effects of different permissions.

    III.        Manage services and processes

    A.         Evaluate and control processes 

    B.         Control and monitor network services and system daemons using systemd.

    C.         Configure secure command line service on remote systems, using OpenSSH.

    IV.        Networking

    A.         Configure network interfaces and settings.

    B.         Archive and copy files from one system to another.

    V.         System Maintenance and Troubleshooting

    A.         Download, install, update, and manage software packages.

    B.         Access, inspect, and use existing file systems.

    C.         Locate and accurately interpret logs of system events for troubleshooting purposes.

     


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
  •  

    CIS 141 - Introduction to VB.NET

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the Visual Basic.NET programming language. Includes Microsoft .NET, .NET framework, common language runtime, getting started with Visual Basic.NET (VB.NET), and object-oriented programming. Also includes user interface programming, VB.NET and the .NET framework, and using ADO.NET in VB.NET

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 129  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe Microsoft’s .NET environment and discuss the principal features of the .NET framework.
    2. Identify the goals of Common Language Runtime (CLR) and describe the advantages and disadvantages of CLR.
    3. Demonstrate the use of VB.NET data types, control structures, subroutines, functions, and console I/O by creating VB.NET console applications.
    4. Describe the role of Object-Oriented Design in creating VB.NET applications, and demonstrate how these ideas are implemented in VB.NET.
    5. Use Windows forms, controls, events, menus, toolbars, and dialogs to demonstrate VB.NET Windows applications.
    6. Describe the features and tools that enable VB.NET to fit into the .NET framework.
    7. Describe ADO.NET and demonstrate the use of ADO.NET to access database information.

    Outline:
    1. What is Microsoft .NET
      1. Applications in an internet age
      2. Tools for today’s applications
      3. A robust windows platform
      4. .NET programming platform
      5. .NET enterprise servers
      6. .NET services and hailstorm
    2. .NET Framework
      1. Evolution to .NET
      2. .NET framework overview
      3. Common language runtime
      4. .NET class library
      5. Common language specification
      6. .NET languages
      7. .NET framework SDK
      8. Visual Studio.NET
    3. Common Language Runtime (CLR)
      1. Goals of CLR
      2. Assemblies
      3. Common type system
      4. Metadata
      5. Virtual exception system
      6. Intermediate language
      7. Managed code
      8. Just-in-time compilation
      9. Garbage collection
    4. Getting Started with Visual Basic.NET
      1. First VB.NET console application
      2. Namespaces
      3. Data types
      4. Control structures
      5. Subroutines and functions
      6. Console I/O
      7. Exception handling
    5. Object-Oriented Programming in VB.NET
      1. Classes
      2. Access control
      3. Methods and properties
      4. Shared data and methods
      5. Inheritance
      6. Overriding methods
      7. Events
      8. Interfaces
    6. User Interface Programming in VB.NET
      1. First VB.NET windows application
      2. Windows forms
      3. Controls
      4. Windows events
      5. Menus
      6. Toolbars
      7. Dialogs
    7. VB.NET and the .NET Framework
      1. Class hierarchies
      2. .NET interfaces
      3. Using generic interfaces
      4. ICloneable and IComparable
      5. System.array
      6. Collections
      7. Delegates
    8. Using ADO.NET in VB.NET
      1. ADO.NET overview
      2. Managed providers
      3. Using DataReaders
      4. Using DataSets
      5. Interacting with XML data


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    CIS 142 - Introduction to C#

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to Microsoft’s .NET Programming Language C. Includes introduction and simple compilation and execution of programs from the Visual Studio IDE; data types and declarations; using methods; creating classes and objects; selection and repetition; and creating and using arrays. Also includes inheritance; exception handling; GUI objects and controls from the Visual Studio IDE; and handling events.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 129  
    Recommendation: Completion of CIS 104 /CSA 104 , have prior programming experience, or consent of instructor before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Compile and execute a C# program.
    2. Use I/O methods in a C# program.
    3. Create and use different data types in a C# program.
    4. Use methods with input and return parameters in a program.
    5. Create object-oriented classes with data and methods.
    6. Demonstrate the concept of overloading methods within a program.
    7. Demonstrate the use of traditional program concepts, including iteration, decision-making, use of Boolean expressions, and nested loops.
    8. Use arrays for storage and retrieval of data in a program.
    9. Employ inheritance in an object-oriented program.
    10. Use abstract classes and interfaces within an object-oriented program.
    11. Employ exception handling in a program.
    12. Use multiple predefined Visual Studio IDE objects and controls in a program.
    13. Create event handling in a GUI program.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to the Visual Studio IDE
    2. Simple Compilation and Execution of Programs from the Visual Studio IDE
    3. Data Types and Declarations
    4. Using Methods
    5. Creating Classes and Objects
    6. Selection and Repetition
    7. Creating and Using Arrays
    8. Inheritance
    9. Exception Handling
    10. GUI Objects from the Visual Studio IDE
    11. Controls from the Visual Studio IDE
    12. Handling Events


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    CIS 162 - Database Design and Development

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to database concepts and terminology. Includes file systems and databases, the relational database model, entity relationship modeling, normalization, and database design.

      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define and explain the importance of the various types of keys: Candidate Keys, Primary Keys, Surrogate Keys and Composite Keys.
    2. Define and explain the importance of Referential Integrity and Foreign Keys.
    3. Define and explain the importance of Normalization: Normal Forms, Functional and Multi-value Dependencies.
    4. Define and explain the importance of the Update anomaly.
    5. Define and explain the importance of the Relationships among Entities: One-to-one, One-to-many and Many-to-many.
    6. Define and explain the importance of the various types of Entities: Weak, Strong and Associative
    7. Define and explain the importance of the Concurrency control elements: Atomic transactions, Lost updates, Resource locking, Transaction isolation levels
    8. Build an entity relationship diagram for a database design.
    9. Build a relational database that conforms to Boyce-Codd normal form.
    10. Write the data definition statements for creating database tables.
    11. Write the data definition statements for inserting data into database tables.

    Outline:
    1. Overview of databases and database products
    2. The Relational Database Model
      1. Keys
      2. Functional dependencies
      3. Multi-value dependencies
      4. Normal forms
      5. The normalization process
    3. Entity Relationship (E-R) Modeling
    4. Database Design
      1. Transforming a model into a design
      2. Relationships between various types of entities
      3. Column properties
      4. Enforcing referential integrity
    5. Database Management – Selected Topics
      1. Atomic transactions
      2. Concurrency
      3. Lost updates
      4. Resource locking
      5. Transaction isolation


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    CIS 170 - CISCO I: Networking Fundamentals

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the fundamentals of networking. Includes network concepts; the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model; binary numbering system; network architecture; Local Area Network (LAN) design and installation; and Cisco troubleshooting procedures. Also includes preparation for Cisco certification examination.

    Recommendation: Consult instructor before enrolling in this course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.  Explain the OSI Model of Networking and how it relates to the TCP/IP model.

    2.  Calculate an IPv4 Network Number from an IPv4 address and an IPv4 subnet mask.

    3.  Explain how OSI layer 2 or MAC addresses and OSI Layer 3 IP address change as an IP packet is

        sent from a PC in one network to a PC in a different network over a Layer 3 router.

    4.  Correctly troubleshoot the inability of an IP packet in one network to negotiate its way to a destination network. 

    5.  Describe the method of frame or packet delivery in an Ethernet network, including CSMA/CD

        and collisions as a method of moving data through a local area network.


    Outline:
    1. Networking Concepts
      1. Terminology
      2. Advantages of networking
      3. Network standards
    2. Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model
      1. Seven layers
      2. Essentials to communicate on a network
      3. Internetworking problems and solutions
      4. Bridges as solutions
      5. Advantages of routing
    3. Binary Numbering System
      1. Binary math and logic
      2. Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and routing tables
      3. Subnet mask
    4. Network Architecture
      1. Media Access Control (MAC) addressing
      2. IP addressing schemes
      3. Class of networks
      4. Subnetworks
      5. Routers
      6. Protocols
        1. Address resolution
        2. Reverse address resolution
        3. Proprietary routing
      7. Hardware for a Local Area Network (LAN)
      8. Media selection
        1. Importance and use
        2. Problems and solutions
        3. Standards 
          1. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
          2. Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA)
          3. Telecommunications Industry Alliance (TIA)
          4. Underwriters Laboratories (UL)
        4. Telecommunications outlets
      9. Cabling
        1. Safety Precautions
        2. Standards 
          1. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
          2. Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA)
          3. Telecommunications Industry Alliance (TIA)
          4. Underwriters Laboratories (UL)
        3. Wiring
        4. Testing
    5. LAN Design and Installation
      1. Feasibility study
      2. Design of a LAN
      3. Topologies
      4. Wiring closets
      5. Data transmission
      6. Cable termination
      7. Cable installation
    6. Cisco Troubleshooting Procedures
      1. Initial and subsequent testing
        1. Effects of Electromagnetic Interference/Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI)
        2. Causes of cross talk
      2. Safe wiring systems
      3. Solution strategies
    7. Preparation for Cisco Certification Examination


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019

  
  •  

    CIS 171 - CISCO II: Networking Router Technologies

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of CIS 170 . Introduction to the fundamentals of networking router technologies. Includes networking concepts; Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model; Local Area Network (LAN) technologies; routing protocols; router configuration files; and Cisco troubleshooting procedures. Also includes preparation for the Cisco certification examination.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 170  
    Recommendation: Consult instructor for alternative prerequisites before enrolling in this course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss networking and the networking manager’s role.
    2. Explain the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Model Standards and the function of the seven layers.
    3. Design a Local Area Network (LAN) using appropriate technologies and media types.
    4. Develop a multi-protocol Cisco routed Wide Area Network (WAN).
    5. Identify the commands necessary to install, configure, and maintain Cisco routers including software revision, interface type, addressing, configuration registers, and status.
    6. Configure and install a five Cisco router switched network and verify correct configuration and performance, including Internet Protocol (IP) addressing and subnet making for each Local Area Network (LAN) connected to the network.
    7. Perform troubleshooting of a WAN configuration, subnet masking, IP addressing, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) problems.
    8. Use concepts and skills to prepare for the Cisco certification examination.

    Outline:
    1. Networking Concepts
      1. Terminology
      2. Reasons for networking
      3. Network manager’s role
    2. Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Model
      1. Standards
      2. Seven layers
      3. Communication between layers
      4. Devices which operate at each layer
    3. Local Area Network (LAN) Technologies
      1. Design and architecture
      2. Ethernet standards, frames, reliability, options
      3. Token ring topologies
      4. Fiber distributed data interface
      5. Wide Area Network (WAN) standards
      6. Cause and solutions
        1. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) problems
        2. Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) problems
    4. Routing Protocols
      1. Static, dynamic routes
      2. Multi-Protocol Routing
      3. Router table updates
      4. Cisco IOS software
      5. Cisco router commands
      6. Addressing schemes
      7. Dynamic routing – link state
      8. Transmission code protocol
      9. LAN to LAN, LAN to WAN
      10. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network layer addressing
      11. Time to convergence
      12. Media types
      13. User interfaces
      14. System setup
    5. Router Configuration Files
      1. Configuration methods
      2. Configuring for Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server
      3. Server control
    6. Cisco Troubleshooting Procedures
      1. Network testing
      2. LAN to LAN routing
      3. EMI and RFI problems
      4. Testing data link/physical layers
      5. Subnet planning
    7. Preparation for Cisco Certification Examination


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019
  
  •  

    CIS 172 - CISCO III: Advanced Routing and Switching

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of CIS 171 . Development of skills to configure advanced routing protocols. Includes Local Area Network (LAN) switching; Virtual LAN (VLAN); LAN design; routing protocols; access lists; and Novell Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) protocol. Also includes preparation for the Cisco certification examination.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 171  
    Recommendation: Consult instructor for alternative prerequisites before enrolling in this course.
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate how Local Area Network (LAN) Switching and Virtual Local Area Network (VLANs) impact performance.
    2. Design, build, and document LANs.
    3. Compare and contrast Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Router Information Protocol (RIP).
    4. Discuss the benefits of access lists.
    5. Perform the implementation and impact of Novell Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) Protocol.
    6. Use concepts and skills to prepare for the Cisco certification examination.

    Outline:
    1. Local Area Network (LAN) Switching
      1. Performance
        1. Broadcasts
        2. Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection (CSMA/CD)
      2. Network Segmentation
      3. Benefits
    2. Virtual LAN (VLAN)
      1. Performance
      2. Logical segmentation
      3. Implementation
        1. Static
        2. Dynamic
    3. LAN Design
      1. Analysis
        1. Media and topology
        2. LAN switching
        3. Routing
      2. Performance
    4. Routing Protocols
      1. Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP)
        1. Analysis
        2. Configuration
      2. Router Information Protocol (RIP)
        1. Configuration
        2. Implementation
    5. Access Lists
      1. Configure
        1. Standard
        2. Extended
      2. Control
      3. Verify
    6. Novell Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) Protocol
      1. Enable
      2. Configure
        1. Ethernet interfaces
        2. Serial interfaces
      3. Performance
    7. Preparation for Cisco Certification Examination


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019
  
  •  

    CIS 173 - CISCO IV: Project Based Learning

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of CIS 172 . Design and configuration of advanced Wide Area Network (WAN) projects using Cisco IOS command set. Includes WAN design; Point-to-Point protocol (PPP); Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); and frame relay. Also includes preparation for Cisco certification examination.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 172  
    Recommendation: Consult instructor for alternative prerequisites before enrolling in this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe serial communication on Wide Area Networks (WANs), connection types, and encapsulation types.
    2. Design, build, and document WAN technology.
    3. Demonstrate implementation of Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP).
    4. Perform the implementation of Integrated System Digital Network (ISDN).
    5. Develop the implementation of frame relay.
    6. Compare and contrast benefits of each protocol.
    7. Design and test an advanced WAN project.
    8. Use concepts and skills to prepare for the Cisco certification examination.

    Outline:
    1. Wide Area Network (WAN)
      1. Serial communication
      2. Connection types
        1. Dedicated
        2. Dial-on-Demand
        3. Packet-Switched
        4. Circuit-Switched
      3. Encapsulation types
        1. Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)
        2. High Level Data Link Control (HDLC)
    2. WAN Design
      1. Hierarchical Design Model
        1. Three layers
        2. Benefits
        3. Performance
      2. Placement
        1. Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)
        2. Frame relay
    3. Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)
      1. Communication
        1. Components
        2. Connection
        3. Negotiation process
      2. Frames
        1. Link Control Protocol (LCP)
        2. Network Control Protocol (NCP)
    4. Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)
      1. Components
      2. Services
      3. Standards
      4. Configuration
    5. Frame Relay
      1. Devices
      2. Connections
        1. Virtual circuits
        2. Terms
      3. Functions
      4. Operations
      5. Configuration
        1. Interfaces
        2. Commands
    6. Preparation for Cisco Certification Examination


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019
  
  •  

    CIS 182 - Introduction to ANSI SQL

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Structured Query Language (SQL). Includes relational databases; SQL basics and nomenclature; simple queries, search conditions, and sorting; single table query processing and unions; simple and multi-table joins; summary queries using columns, group queries, and subqueries; and query expressions. Also includes adding, deleting, and modifying data from the database; referential integrity and constraints; creating databases; creating, removing, and modifying tables; and defining constraints.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 162  
    Information: CIS 162  may be waived with consent of instructor.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Perform simple database queries.
    2. Perform multi-table queries (joins).
    3. Perform summary queries.
    4. Sort and process the results returned by database queries.
    5. Update databases by adding, deleting or modifying data.
    6. Create a database and define the tables.
    7. Set data integrity constraints.

    Outline:
    1. Relational Databases and Introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL)
    2. SQL Basics and Nomenclature
    3. Simple Queries
    4. Search Conditions and Sorting
    5. Single Table Query Processing and Unions
    6. Simple Joins (Equi-Joins)
    7. Multi-Table Joins
    8. Summary Queries Using Column Functions
    9. Grouped Queries and Search Conditions
    10. Subqueries and Query Expressions
    11. Adding and Deleting Data to the Database
    12. Modifying Data in the Database
    13. Referential Integrity and Constraints
    14. Creating Databases
    15. Creating and Removing Tables and Modifying Table Definitions
    16. Defining Constraints


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    CIS 188 - Scripting for Automation

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Principles of systems automation on the Windows and Linux operating systems. Includes the use of PowerShell and Python to automate tasks and ensure consistent configurations.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 137  
    Recommendation: CIS 129  or introductory programming knowledge such as variables, loops and decision structures.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the benefits of automation
    2. Construct, test, and execute Python scripts.
    3. Construct, test, and execute PowerShell scripts.
    4. Modify existing scripts
    5. Use automation to perform common system administration functions

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Automation
    2. Programming Basics and Review
      1. Data types
      2. Data structures
      3. Understanding flow control
      4. Using loops
      5. Error handling
    3. Powershell
      1. Automating active directory
      2. Windows services
      3. Files and directories
      4. Software applications
    4. Python
      1. Basics of Python
      2. Working with files and text
      3. Networking
      4. Processes
      5. Cloud automation


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 198T1 - Blockchain Technology Fundamentals

    1.00 Credits, 1.00 Contact Hours
    1.00 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Fundamental ideas behind blockchain technology as it applies to cryptocurrency and business applications. Includes basic concepts that make blockchain technology different from traditional transaction data storage systems. Also includes current and future uses of blockchain technology in business.       



  
  •  

    CIS 199 - Introductory Co-op: Computer Information Systems

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Introduction to Cooperative Education for first-year students (instruction which provides for success in securing and retaining a training job related to subject area). Includes communication skills, time and energy management, stress and its management, careers: information and its uses, job market, principles, theories, and practices in the career field, and problems in the work situation.

    Corequisite(s): CIS 199WK  
    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of two credit hours. If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the need for skills in oral and written communication and the importance to job success.
    2. Describe the techniques for managing time and energy for job efficiency.
    3. Identify stress in work situations and begin to develop techniques for coping with stress.
    4. Find and related information on some career field to career goals.
    5. Write a resume and plan an employment interview (real or simulated) and observe (real or filmed) or successfully complete such experiences (s), where available.
    6. Identify some basic principles and theories learned in courses completed, and apply them to problems encountered in real work situations.
    7. Identify problems which arise in work situations and develop some techniques for successful solution to them.

    Outline:
    1. Communication Skills
    1. Importance in job success
    2. Oral skills developed
    3. Written skills developed
    1. Time and Energy Management
    1. Identifying resources and their uses
    2. Techniques for managing, for job efficiency
    1. Stress and Its Management
    1. Types of job stress
    2. Causes of stress
    3. Characteristics of stress
    4. Techniques for managing job stress
    1. Careers: Information and Its Uses
    1. Review of careers in field of study
    2. Sources of career information
    3. Uses of career information
    4. Career objectives
    5. Career plans
    1. Placing Yourself on the Job Market
    1. Identifying varied job markets
    2. Selecting job markets appropriate to your potential
    3. Aspects of presenting oneself on the market
    1. Job information
    2. Resume writing
    3. Backing up the resume
    4. References
    5. The interview
    1. Principles, Theories, and Practices in the Career Field
    1. Application in the work situation
    2. Ongoing discussion
    3. Understanding through application
    1. Problems in the Work Situation
    1. Problem (types) identified
    2. Ways of dealing with problems encountered – ongoing discussion each session


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2009
  
  •  

    CIS 199WK - Introductory Co-op Work: Computer Information Systems

    1-8 Credits, 5-40 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 5-40 lab periods

    A supervised cooperative work program for students in related occupation area. Teacher-coordinators work with students and their supervisor. Variable credit is available by special arrangement.

    Corequisite(s): CIS 199  
    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of sixteen credit hours. If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply some of the principles, knowledge, and skills learned in classroom and laboratory in real work situations.
    2. Demonstrate improved skills, competence, and levels of accuracy in handling responsibility and work assignments.
    3. Demonstrate improved self-confidence in handling work assignments.
    4. Demonstrate skills in managing human relations: peers (children, customers, clients, etc.) and supervisors.
    5. Deal responsibly with the world of work: reporting promptly and management of time, energy, and stress.
    6. Demonstrate improved understanding of the career field.

    Outline:
    Students are assigned to work (5 hours per credit per week) in a selected field experience job, which is appropriate to their program of study and their level of readiness to enter the world of work.  They will meet with the instructor and on-site supervisor to enhance growth and evaluate progress.  Weekly seminars with other students in the Cooperative Education/field experience or practicum will provide further insights and growth.  Evaluation will be based on each student’s planned objectives and activities for the experience.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2009
  
  •  

    CIS 216 - Introduction to Wireshark and Network Analysis

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Introduction to network analysis with Wireshark and other tools. Includes key Wireshark elements to analyze and identify TCP\IP traffic using capture, display, color filtering, profiles, graphing, and more. Includes the exploration of the basics for analyzing and defining information as provided by network monitoring and intrusion detection.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 119  or CIS 170 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Analyze network traffic at the packet level to identify threats and problems.
    2. Use filters to evaluate network traffic in order to solve complex issues.
    3. Demonstrate the use of Wireshark features to identify complex network protocols.

    Outline:
    1. Key Wireshark Elements and Traffic Flows
      1. Wireshark traffic capture
      2. Differentiate a packet from a frame
      3. Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) packet through a network
      4. Wireshark resources
      5. Typical network traffic
      6. Open trace files captured with other tools
    2. Customize Wireshark Views and Settings
      1. Columns in the packet list pane
      2. Wireshark dissectors
      3. Non-standard port numbers
      4. Wireshark displays certain traffic types
      5. Wireshark for different tasks (profiles)
      6. Wireshark configuration files
      7. Time columns to spot latency problems
    3. Capture Method and Capture Filters
      1. Best capture location to troubleshoot slow browsing or file downloads
      2. Options for Ethernet network
      3. Options for wireless network
      4. Active interfaces
      5. Tons of traffic
      6. Techniques to spot sporadic problems
      7. Amount of traffic you have to work with
      8. Traffic based on addresses Media Access Control/Internet Protocol (MAC/IP)
      9. Traffic for a specific application
      10. Specific Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) traffic
    4. Display Filters on Specific Traffic
      1. Display filter syntax
      2. Default display filters
      3. Filter on HTTP traffic
      4. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) display filter errors
      5. Display filters based on an Internet Protocol (IP) address,  range of addresses, or subnet
      6. Filter on a field in a packet
      7. Filter on a single TCP or Uniform Data Protocol (UDP) conversation
      8. Display filters with multiple include and exclude conditions
      9. Parentheses to change filter meaning
      10. Yellow display filters
      11. Keyword in a trace file
      12. Wildcards in display filters
      13. Filters to spot communication delays
      14. Display filters into buttons
    5. Color and Export Interesting Packets
      1. Applied coloring rules
      2. Checksum errors coloring rule
      3. Coloring rule to highlight delays
      4. Colorize a single conversation
      5. Export packets of interest
      6. Export packet details
    6. Build and Interpret Tables and Graphs
      1. Who is talking to whom on the network
      2. Top talkers
      3. Applications seen on the network
      4. Application and host bandwidth usage
      5. TCP errors on the network
      6. Expert infos errors meaning
      7. Network errors
    7. Reassemble Traffic for Faster Analysis
      1. Web browsing sessions
      2. File transfer via File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
      3. HTTP objects transferred in a web browsing session
    8. Comments to Trace Files and Packets
      1. Comments to trace files
      2. Comments to individual packets
      3. Export packet comments for a report
    9. Command-Line Tools to Capture, Split, and Merge Traffic
      1. Large trace files into a file set
      2. Multiple trace files
      3. Traffic at command line
      4. Capture filters during command-line capture
      5. Display filters during command-line capture
      6. Tshark to export specific field values and statistics from a trace file
      7. Wireshark and network analysis
    10. Analysis Through Monitoring
      1. Palo Alto logs and filtering
      2. Application based firewalling
      3. Correlating traffic


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
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    CIS 218 - Introduction to Voice over IP (VoIP)

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the concepts of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) from the history to expected future uses in the workplace and home. Includes an overview, digital voice fundamentals, standards, how an Internet Protocol (IP) phone call works, protocols and structure, relationship to the Open Standards Interconnection (OSI) model, gateways, quality of service, and router concerns.

    Recommendation: Completion of CIS 119  or have networking experience before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a Financial Aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain and design basic Internet Protocol (IP) networks.
    2. Discuss basic concepts associated with telephony.
    3. Describe the advantages of using Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) relative to the Plain Old Telephone System (POTS).
    4. Explain the hardware and software used in VoIP networks.
    5. Describe important protocols used in VoIP and their relationship to the Open Standards Interconnection (OSI) Model.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to set up a simple VoIP system.
    7. Discuss problem areas within VoIP systems.
    8. Identify quality of service (QoS) parameters within VoIP systems.
    9. Discuss future possibilities/uses within communications.

    Outline:
    1. Overview of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
      1. Industry o0verview
      2. Internet Protocol (IP) telephony
      3. Costs
      4. The lure of VoIP
      5. Basic equipment and network
      6. Model for IP telephony
    2. Digital Voice Fundamentals
      1. Basic telephony overview
      2. Packet voice fundamentals
      3. Circuit/packet switched comparison
    3. Standards for VoIP
    4. How an IP Phone Call Works
    5. VoIP Protocols and Structure
    6. Relationship of VoIP to the Open Standards Interconnection (OSI) Seven-Layer Model
      1. Application layer issues
      2. H.225 and H.245
      3. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
    7. VoIP Gateways
      1. Gateway functions
      2. Necessity of gateways
      3. Gateway components and features
    8. Quality of Service (QoS) in VoIP
      1. Defining QoS
      2. QoS parameters
      3. QoS and the network
    9. VoIP Router Concerns
    10. The Future of VoIP


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2013
  
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    CIS 219 - Introduction to Virtual Computing

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Introduction to managing a cloud virtualized data center. Includes virtual machine deployment, management, monitoring, and automation. Also includes working with virtual networks, implementing disaster recovery and high availability, virtual security, and performance optimization.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 119  or CIS 170 .
    Information: Students will have the opportunity to obtain vendor specific badges.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Deploy standard cloud infrastructure features such as virtual networks and servers, load balancing, and auto-scaling virtual machines.
    2. Follow industry best practices for maintaining, monitoring, and securing numerous virtual machines.

    Outline:
    1. Overview of Virtual Machines
      1. History of virtualization
      2. Components of a virtual machine
        1. Memory
        2. CPU
        3. Network
        4. Storage
    2. Overview of Cloud Computing
      1. Introduction to Microsoft Azure
      2. Introduction to Google Cloud Compute
      3. Introduction to Amazon Web Services
    3. Storage
      1. Simple storage services (S3)
        1. Encryption
        2. Replication
        3. Storage Classes
        4. Logging
        5. Performance
      2. Glacier
        1. Data retrieval
        2. Glacier vs S3
    4. Compute
      1. Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)
        1. Instance lifecycle
        2. Securing an instance
      2. Elastic Block Storage (EBS)
    5. Networking
      1. Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)
        1. DHCP options
        2. Subnets
        3. Routing
        4. Elastic IPs
        5. Security Groups
        6. Network Address Translation (NAT)
        7. Virtual Private Gateways
      2. Elastic Load Balancing
      3. CloudWatch
      4. Auto Scaling
    6. Route 53 and DNS
      1. DNS resolution basics
      2. Resiliency
      3. Record Types
    7. Securing AWS
      1. Identity and Access Management
      2. Firewall
      3. Account Security
    8. Risk and Compliance
      1. AWS Risk and compliance program
      2. Reports and certifications


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
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    CIS 221 - Deploying and Managing Windows Servers

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Windows server administration. Includes the core concepts and technologies to administer Windows server environments. Also includes basics of installation and configuration, storage, network protocols, server roles, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), Group Policy, Hyper-V, and server monitoring.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 103  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Manage Windows Servers in Host and Compute Environments
    2. Design Storage Solutions
    3. Setup Hyper-V
    4. Setup Windows Containers
    5. Setup High Availability

    Outline:
    I.           Manage Windows Servers in Host and Compute Environments

    A.         Install and upgrade servers

    B.         Create and manage images for deployment

    C.         Implement Windows Server Update Services

    D.         Configure WSUS

    E.         Monitor performance and security of Windows Server

    II.          Design Storage Solutions

    A.         Configure disks and volumes

    B.         Implement server storage

    III.        Setup Hyper-V

    A.         Install and configure Hyper-V

    B.         Configure virtual machines

    C.         Configure Hyper-V storage

    IV.        Setup Windows Containers

    A.         Deploy Windows containers

    B.         Manage Windows containers

    V.         Setup High Availability

    A.         Implement failover clustering

    B.         Implement network load balancing


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
  •  

    CIS 222 - Implementing Windows Server Network Infrastructure

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Knowledge and skills to install, configure, maintain, and support a Microsoft Windows network infrastructure. Includes Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), IPAM, VPN and Radius.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 221  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.          Setup Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) services.

    2.          Setup Domain Name System (DNS).

    3.          Design network connectivity solutions.

    4.          Manage advanced network solutions.


    Outline:
    I.Configure DNS

    A.Install and configure servers

    B.Create DNS zones and records

    II.Configure DHCP services

    A.Install and configure DHCP

    B.Implement and maintain (IPAM)

    III.Design network connectivity solutions

    A.Implement VPN

    B.Configure a RADIUS server and client

    C.Configure IPv4 and IPv6 addressing

    D.Implement Distributed File Systems (DFS)

    IV.Manage advanced networking solutions

    A.NIC Teaming

    B.QoS

    C.Software defined networking

     


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
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    CIS 223 - Implementing Windows Directory Services

    3 Credits, 2 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Knowledge and skills to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows Active Directory services. Includes active directory structure, active Directory services, domain name system (DNS), group policy implementation, user accounts, software development, group policy security, and administration of active directory objects.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 221  
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.          Design Active Directory solutions

    2.          Manage Group Policy

    3.          Setup Active Directory Certificate Services

    4.          Setup Identity Federation


    Outline:
    I.Design Active Directory solutions

    1. Install and configure domain controllers

    2. Create and manage Active Directory users and computers

    3. Create and manage Active Directory groups and OUs

    4. Create managed services accounts

    5. Implement authentication and account policies

    6. Backup and restore Active Directory

    7. Setup read-only domain controllers

    1. Monitor replication

    1. Manage Group Policy

      1. Create and manage group policy objects

      2. Managing system and user preferences

      3. Managing Software installation

      4. Managing security settings

      5. Importing administrative templates

    III.Setup Active Directory Certificate Services

    1. Install and configure AD Certificate Services

    2. Manage user and computer certificates

    1. Setup Identity Federation

      1. Install and configure AD Federation Services

      2. Configure multi-factor authentication

      3. Configure authentication policies



    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
  •  

    CIS 225 - Linux System and Network Administration

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Skills needed to extend, automate, and better secure an existing Linux deployment. Includes advanced file-system management capabilities, security controls, and firewall configuration. Also includes system optimization techniques improved storage management.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 137  
    Information: Combined with CIS 137, this course helps prepare students to take the Red Hat Certified System Exam. This course is equivalent to RH 134.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Setup Red Hat Enterprise Linux using Kickstart,
    2. Manage file systems and logical volumes.
    3. Manage scheduled jobs.
    4. Setup network file systems.
    5. Manage SELinux.
    6. Manage firewalls.
    7. Explain troubleshooting steps.

    Outline:
    1. Automate Installations Using Kickstart
      1. Defining an Anaconda Kickstart system
      2. Deploying a new virtual system with Kickstart
    1. Regular Expressions
      1. Regular expression fundamentals
      2. Matching text with grep
    2. Creating and Editing Text Files with vim
      1. vim workflow
      2. Editing files with vim
    3. Manage Scheduled Jobs
      1. Schedule one time tasks with at
      2. Schedule recurring tasks with cron
      3. Viewing and editing system tasks
    4. Prioritizing Linux Processes
      1. Scheduler policies
      2. Using the nice command
    5. Controlling Access with Access Control Lists
      1. POSIX access control lists
      2. Securing files with ACLs
    6. SELinux Security
      1. Enabling and monitoring modes
      2. Changing modes
      3. Changing contexts
      4. Changing booleans
      5. Troubleshooting SELinux
    7. Using Network-Defined Users and Groups
      1. Using Identity Management Services
      2. Joining a system to IPA
      3. Joining a system to Active Directory
    8. Managing Storage
      1. Adding disks, partitions, and files systems
      2. Logical Volume Management Storage
        1. Managing Logical Volumes
        2. Extending Logical Volumes
      3. Access network storage with NFS
        1. Manually mounting NFS storage
        2. Automounting NFS storage
      4. Access Network Storage with SMB
    9. Controlling and Troubleshooting the Boot Process
      1. Repairing common boot issues
      2. Repairing file systems at boot
      3. Correcting boot loader issues
    10. Control Firewalls with Firewalld
      1. Limiting network communication
      2. Enabling and Disabling the Firewall


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
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    CIS 226 - Advanced Linux Networking

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Advanced concepts in Linux networking. Includes background review, Linux installation, Network File System (NFS) configuration, proxy servers, firewalls, and AD Domains and/or Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) authentication.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 225  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Manage various Linux distributions and network configurations.
    2. Setup network file system (NFS) client/server environment.
    3. Setup Samba as a Windows AD Domain Controller.
    4. Setup proxy server technology for client and server acceleration
    5. Evaluate using Linux as a firewall.
    6. Evaluate Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) as an advanced Auth system.

    Outline:
    1. Background Review
      1. Pipes and redirection
      2. Linux security and passwords
      3. Linux file system concepts
      4. Daemon processes and logging
    2. Basic Linux Installation
      1. Overview of installation and deployment methods
      2. Adding “normal” users to the system
      3. Configuration of sudo for system administration
    3. Network File System (NFS) Configuration
      1. Basic NFS exports
      2. Identical User Identifiers (UIDs) and NFS exports
      3. Setup stations to mount NFS exports on boot
      4. Continued NFS use with NIS integration
    4. Proxy Servers
      1. Basic configuration
      2. Proxy servers for webserver acceleration
      3. Access Control Lists (ACLs) – restricting who can use your proxy
      4. E2Guardian– restricting what your users can access
    5. Firewalls
      1. Basics of port blocking
      2. Basics of routing
      3. Transparent redirection
      4. Network address translation / IP masquerading
    6. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)
      1. LDAP database basics
      2. LDAP for authentication
      3. LDAP for group bookmarks and address books


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22
  
  •  

    CIS 227 - Cyber Law and Ethics

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Basic understanding of current cyber security laws and the ethical principles involved. Includes describing and evaluating the impact of various laws and regulations in an industry or business. Also includes the importance of policies, procedures, guidelines, and information classification; risk identification; evaluation and mitigation; and the role of compliance.

    Recommendation: Completion of WRT 101  ,WRT 101S , or WRT 101SE  before enrolling in this course, or concurrent enrollment. If any recommended course is taken, see a Financial Aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.        Explain the ethical and legal ramifications of accessing, using, and manipulating data in today’s society.

    2.        Implement examples of modern compliance in relation to NIST and other applicable standards, laws, and regulations.

    3.        Apply ethical and moral behaviors when implementing and using information technology.


    Outline:
    1. Principles of Ethics
      1. Ethical values in a digital world
      2. Ethical decision making
      3. Ethics as applied to the gathering and possession of information
      4. Ethical vs. unethical hacking
      5. Professional organizations
    2. Anti-Hacking Laws
      1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act
      2. Origins of the CFAA
      3. Views of “Exceeds Authorized Access” and “Without Authorization”
      4. Sections of the CFAA
      5. Digital Millennium Copyright Act
      6. Cyberwarfare - The Tallinn Manual
    3. Business Impact
      1. Policies and procedures
      2. Information classification
      3. Technical baselines
      4. Risk management
      5. Internal and external training
      6. Cybersecurity legal standards and requirements applied to businesses and industries
      7. Tradeoffs and challenges balancing security and business need
    4. Compliance
      1. Sarbanes – Oxley
      2. Gramm – Leach – Bliley
      3. Privacy (COPPA) HIPAA / FERPA
      4. USA Patriot Act
      5. Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 508
      6. Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS)
      7. European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
      8. Other Federal laws and regulations
      9. State law and regulations
      10. Practical effects of compliance requirements
    5. State, US, and International Standards/Jurisdictions
      1. NIST
      2. ISO
      3. COBIT
      4. SABSA
      5. TOGAF
      6. ITIL
    6. Data Breach Response Management
      1. Internal management of data breach
      2. External management of data breach
      3. Ethical decisions and ramifications post data breach
      4. Data breach response plans


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021-2022

  
  •  

    CIS 228 - Fundamentals of Network Security

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Introduction and general overview of security measures for computer networks. Includes authentication methods and techniques; attacks and malicious code; remote access concepts; email and web security; directory and file transfer services; and wireless protocols and security. Also includes hardware devices; topologies and security; methods of intrusion detection; establishing security baselines; introduction to cryptography; disaster recovery policies and procedures; and forensics, risk management, and auditing measures.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 119  
    Information: This course may help in the preparation for the CompTIA Security+ Exam.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Evaluate methods to detect indicators of compromise.
    2. Apply common security tools.
    3. Interpret vulnerability scans and penetration testing results.
    4. Summarize risk management best practices.
    5. Assess the risk of security designs.

    Outline:
      I.         Threats and Vulnerabilities

    A.         Indicators of compromise

    B.         Types of attacks

    C.         Threat actors

    D.         Penetration testing 

    E.         Vulnerability scanning

     II.         Technologies and Tools

    A.         Common hardware and software network security tools

    B.         Security assessment

    C.         Implement secure protocols

    III.         Architecture and Design

    A.         Industry standards, framework and reference architectures

    B.         Network architecture security

    C.         Secure systems design

    D.         Embedded systems

    E.         Application and development concepts

    F.         Cloud and virtualization security

    G.         Physical security controls

    IV.         Identity and Access Management

    A.         Concepts

    B.         Services

    C.         Controls

    D.         Account management

    V.         Risk Management

    A.         Policies, plans and procedures

    B.         Business impact analysis

    C.         Risk management processes and concepts

    D.         Incident response

    E.         Disaster recovery and business continuity

    VI.         Cryptography and PKI

    A.         Cryptography concepts

    B.         Common algorithms

    C.         Wireless security settings

    D.         Public key infrastructure (PKI)


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
  •  

    CIS 229 - Protecting Your PC and Network: Countermeasures to Network

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Management of security for networking security professionals. Includes an overview of risk assessment and risk management principles, the CIS (confidentiality, integrity and availability) Triad, security management and policies, access controls, software development security, business continuity, and disaster recovery planning. Also includes an introduction to cryptology, legal aspects of computer crime, telecommunications, and network security.

    Recommendation: Completion of CIS 119  or CIS 170 , and CIS 228  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: This course corresponds to the CISSP Certification (Certified Information Security Specialist Profession), but is not intended as a complete preparation for the CISSP Exam.
     

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss risk assessment and management techniques in IT security.
    2. Categorize types of threats or malware in software security.
    3. Explain countermeasures to malware within the area of software security.
    4. Discuss the use of Internet Protocols, (TCP/IP and TCP/UDP) Ports and their use in malware attacks.
    5. Explain the trade-offs of the Security Triad as they relate to securing information.
    6. Discuss fraud and cybercrime topics of importance.
    7. Discuss public and private key encryption techniques used in securing information.

    Outline:
    1. Risk Assessment and Risk Management within Information Security
      1. Risk avoidance
      2. Risk mitigation
      3. Risk acceptance
    2. Methods of Controlling Access to Information
      1. Possession-based authentication
      2. Biometric authentication
      3. Multi-factor authentication
    3. Ensuring Security through Software Development
      1. Operating system security
      2. Application development security
      3. Object-oriented programming and security
    4. Identification of Threats and Malware within Information Security
      1. Buffer overflow attacks
      2. Types of malicious software
        1. Viruses
        2. Trojan horses
        3. Rootkits
        4. Bots
    5. Employing Countermeasures to Threats and Malware within Information Security
    1. Anti-virus software
    2. Anti-rootkit software
    3. Firewalls
    4. White-listing software
    1. Introduction to Internet Protocols and TCP/UDP (Transmission Control Protocol/User Datagram Protocol) Ports
    1. IPv4 Addressing and Network Computation
    2. TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) Introduction
    3. Security flaws in TCP/IPv4
    1. Guaranteeing Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning
    1. Classifying disasters
    2. The business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery lifecycle (DRL)
    3. Developing BC and DRL plans
    1. Exploring the legal aspects and regulations in investigations
    1. The roles of computers in crime
    2. Categories of computer crimes
    1. Espionage and cyber warfare
    2. Theft and fraud
    3. Harassment
    4. Cyber fraud
    1. Security Operations Employed in Protecting Information
      1. Security operations concepts
    1. Need-to-know
    2. Least privilege
    3. Separation of duties
    4. Job rotation

    B.   Backups

    1. Data restoration
    2. Protection of backup media
    3. Offsite storage of backup media
    1. Introduction to Physical and Environmental Security Telecommunications and Network Security
    1. Site access security
    2. Equipment protection
    3. Environmental controls
    1. The 10 domains of Knowledge for the CISSP (Certified Information Security Specialist Profession)
    2. Public and Private Key Encryption Methods
      1. Overview of public vs private key encryption
      2. Public key infrastructure
      3. Popular encryption algorithms
    3. Security Architecture and Design
      1. Security models
        1. Mandatory access control
        2. Discretionary access control
        3. Role-based access control
        4. Rule-based access control

    B. Computer hardware architecture

    1. Central processor unit
    2. Storage
    3. Bus


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018-2019
  
  •  

    CIS 234 - Project Management

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Required skills necessary to manage small-to-medium size IT projects. Includes the knowledge and skills required to manage the project lifecycle, ensure appropriate communication, manage resources, manage stakeholders, and maintain project documentation.

    Information: This course provides helpful information and skills in preparation for the CompTIA Project certification examination.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.        Summarize the properties of the project, phases, schedules, roles and responsibilities, and cost controls, as well as identifying the basic aspects of Agile methodology.

    2.        Predict the impact of various constraint variables and influences throughout the project and explain the importance of risk strategies and activities.

    3.        Use appropriate communication methods of influence and change control processes within the context of a project.

    4.        Compare and contrast various project management tools and analyze a project and partner-centric documentation.


    Outline:
    1. Project Basics
      1. Properties of a project
      2. Project roles and responsibilities
      3. Compare standard project phases
      4. Project cost control
      5. Organizational structure
      6. Developing project schedules
      7. Agile methodology
      8. Personnel management
    2. Project Constraints
      1. Constraint variables and influences
      2. Risk strategies and activities
    3. Communication and Change Management
      1. Appropriate communication methods
      2. Factors influencing communication methods
      3. Communication triggers
      4. Identifying the target audience
      5. Using defined change control process
      6. Types of organization change
    4. Tools and Documentation
      1. Compare project management tools
        1. Project scheduling
        2. Dashboards
        3. Knowledge management
        4. Performance measurement tools
        5. SWOT analysis
        6. Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, Informed (RACI) Matrix
      2. Project centric documentation
        1. Project charter
        2. Project management plan
        3. Scope statement
        4. Communication plan
        5. Meeting agenda/minutes
        6. Action items
        7. Status reports
        8. Issues log
      3. Vendor-centric documentation
        1. Request for Information (RFI)
        2. Request for Quote (RFQ)
        3. Request for Proposal (RFP)


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20

  
  •  

    CIS 235 - Advanced Topics in Linux/Unix Security

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Overview for intermediate users of Linux and Linux administrators focusing on security issues. Includes background review, discovering network vulnerabilities, vulnerability mitigation, management awareness, intrusion detection, data gathering, and WiFi.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 225  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Install various Linux distributions and network configurations.
    2. Discover network and system vulnerabilities.
    3. Explain methods of conveying network security issues to management.
    4. Describe the various aspects of Intrusion detection.
    5. Explain the process of data gathering for law enforcement.
    6. Perform WiFi network security and security augmentation.

    Outline:
    1. Background Review
      1. The Unix philosophy
      2. Editing, compiling, linking, and running programs
      3. Pipes and redirection
      4. Unix security and passwords
      5. Unix file system concepts
      6. Basic Linux installation
      7. Adding normal users to the system
    2. Discovering Network Vulnerabilities
      1. Nmap – port scanning
      2. Nessus – network attack system
      3. Running processes and port association
    3. Vulnerability Mitigation
      1. Iptables – Shorewall
      2. Running processes and ports
      3. No-execute file systems
      4. Secure protocols
      5. Tunneling of services
    4. Management Awareness
      1. Security risk
      2. Money and the corporate bottom line
      3. Legal liability
    5. Intrusion Detection
      1. Log files
      2. Network intrusion detection systems
      3. File modification tracking
    6. Data Gathering
      1. Law enforcement contacts
      2. Backing up log files
      3. Printouts
      4. Replication of hard disk drives as evidence
    7. WiFi
      1. Risks of an open network
      2. Corporate wireless security
      3. Home/telecommuter wireless security
      4. How public hotspots can put your data at risk


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    CIS 244 - Securing Windows Server

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Identify security issues through use of auditing and the Advanced Threat Analysis feature in Windows Server. Includes mitigation of malware threats, securing the virtualization platform, and use of deployment options such as Nano server and containers to enhance security. Also includes protecting access to files by using encryption and dynamic access control to enhance security.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 221  
    Information: Content for this course is based on Microsoft Securing Server 2016 (Exam 70-744).
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Create multiple levels of Windows server hardening.
    2. Explain functional and technical impacts of using Windows server security baselines.
    3. Analyze levels of authentication and threat protection.

    Outline:
    I.           Server Hardening

    A.       Disk and file encryption

    B.       Server patching and updating

    C.       Malware protection

    D.       Credential protection

    E.       Microsoft security compliance toolkit

    II.         Virtualization

    A.       Host guardian service

    B.       Key protection services

    C.       Shielded VMs

    D.       Encrypted VMs

    III.        Network Infrastructure

    A.       Windows firewall

    B.       Datacenter firewall

    C.       IPSEC

    D.       DNSSEC

    IV.        Privileged Access Control

    A.       Microsoft identity manager

    B.       Just-Enough-Administration

    C.       Privileged Access Workstations (PAWS)

    D.       Local Administrator Password Solution (LAPS)

    V.         Threat Detection

    A.       Audit policies

    B.       Microsoft advanced threat analytics

    C.       Operations Management Suite (OMS)

    VI.        Workload Specific Security

    A.       Dynamic access control

    B.       File server resource manager

    C.       File classification infrastructure


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2020

  
  •  

    CIS 245 - Cyber Analytics, Detection, and Response

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Knowledge and skills required to configure and use threat detection and monitoring tools, data analysis, vulnerability identification, and threats identification.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 225  
    Information: This course may help in the preparation for the Comp TIA CySA+ certification and examination.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.        Implement a vulnerability management process and incorporate analysis of the results of the scan.

    2.        Develop a response plan based on evaluation of incident impact.

    3.        Prepare a toolkit with appropriate forensics tools and communication plan.

    4.        Recommend remediation of security issues related to identity and access management.

    5.        Configure threat-detection tools.

    6.        Apply environmental reconnaissance techniques using appropriate tools.


    Outline:
    1. Threat Management
      1. Practices used to secure a corporate environment
        1. Penetration testing
        2. Reverse engineering
        3. Training and exercises
        4. Risk evaluation
      2. Network threats
        1. Network segmentation
        2. Endpoint security
        3. System hardening
        4. Network access control
      3. Network reconnaissance
        1. Real-time data analysis
        2. Data correlation
        3. Logging
      4. Systems reconnaissance
        1. Service discovery
        2. Social engineering
        3. Topology discovery
    2. Vulnerability Management
      1. Vulnerability management process
        1. Asset discovery and inventory
        2. Scanning and reporting
        3. Remediation
      2. Common vulnerabilities
        1. Virtual infrastructure
        2. Servers
        3. Endpoints
        4. Mobile devices
        5. SCADA and ICS
    3. Cyber Incident Response
      1. Impact of incident
        1. Threat classification
        2. Data classification
        3. Severity and prioritization
      2. Forensic evaluation
        1. Physical forensics kits
        2. Investigation software
      3. Identifying an incident
        1. Network symptoms
        2. Host symptoms
        3. Application symptoms
      4. Post incident recovery
    4. Security Architecture and Tool Sets
      1. Common policies, controls, and procedures
        1. Regulatory frameworks
        2. Review of sample policy, controls, and procedures
        3. Verification and auditing
      2. Identity and access management
        1. Context-based authentication
        2. Endpoint repositories
        3. Federation and single sign-on


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21

  
  •  

    CIS 247 - Ethical Hacking

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Skills necessary to plan and scope an assessment, understand legal and compliance requirements, perform vulnerability scanning and penetration testing, analyze data, and effectively report and communicate results.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 137  
    Information: This course may help in preparation for the CompTIA PenTest+ examination.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.          Analyze results from a vulnerability scan.

    2.         Assess known vulnerabilities across multiple technologies such as network devices, wireless, applications and operating systems.

    3.          Compare ethical penetration testing and unethical hacking.


    Outline:
    1. Planning and Scoping
      1. Understanding the target audience
      2. Rules of engagement and disclaimers
      3. Communications escalation
      4. Legal
        1. Contracts
          1. SOW
          2. NDA
          3. MSA
        2. Written authorization
      5. Types of assessments
        1. Red Team
        2. Compliance-based
        3. Goal based
      6. Target Selection
        1. On-site vs off-site
        2. Social engineering
      7. Strategies
        1. Black box
        2. White box
        3. Gray box
    2. Information Gathering and Vulnerability Identification
      1. Information gathering
        1. Scanning and enumeration
        2. Packet inspection
        3. Fingerprinting
        4. Eavesdropping
        5. Decompiling and debugging
        6. Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)
      2. Perform scans
        1. Types of scans
          1. Discovery
          2. Full
          3. Stealth
          4. Compliance
        2. Application scanning
        3. Consideration
          1. Bandwidth
          2. Execution time
          3. Business impact
      3. Leveraging Information
        1. Map vulnerabilities to potential exploits
        2. Techniques to execute attack
          1. Exploit chaining
          2. Social engineering
          3. Password attacks
            1. Credential brute force
            2. Rainbow tables
            3. Dictionary attacks
    3. Attacks and Exploits
      1. Social engineering attacks
        1. Spear phishing
        2. Impersonation
        3. USB drop
      2. Network based vulnerabilities
        1. Man in the middle
        2. DoS
        3. DNS exploits
        4. SMB, SMTP, SNMP, FTP exploits
        5. Pass the hash
      3. Wireless and RF vulnerabilities
        1. RFID cloning
        2. Bluejacking
        3. Deauthentication attacks
        4. Credential harvesting
      4. Application vulnerabilities
        1. Injections
        2. Cross site scripting
        3. Cookie manipulation
        4. Directory traversal
        5. Default/weak credentials
        6. Session hijacking
      5. Local host vulnerabilities
        1. OS Vulnerabilities
        2. Privilege escalation
        3. Physical device security
        4. Sandbox escape
      6. Post exploitation
        1. Lateral movement
        2. Persistence
        3. Exfiltration
        4. Covering your tracks
    4. Penetration Testing Tools
      1. Scanning
      2. Credential harvesting
      3. OSINT
      4. Wireless
      5. Web Proxies
      6. Frameworks
    5. Reporting and Communication
      1. Report writing and handling
      2. Post engagement cleanup
      3. Follow-up actions/retesting
      4. Attestation of findings
      5. Recommend mitigation techniques for discovered vulnerabilities


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2021/22

  
  •  

    CIS 250 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Beginning assembly language programming. Includes number systems, machine architecture, program design, the assembler, the stack, array processing and indexing, and sorting. Also includes program debugging and testing, performance issues, program profiling, and programmer productivity issues.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 131  
    Recommendation: Consult instructor for alternative prerequisites before enrolling in this course.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define various Machine Architecture features.
    2. Demonstrate use of basic RISC instructions.
    3. Explain combinational and stateful logic of working CPU.
    4. Describe basic ALU implementation.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of internal and external procedures.
    6. Convert numbers between different bases.
    7. Compare math and logical operations using binary and hexadecimal number systems.
    8. Explain how stack is affected by various statements and parameter passing.

    Outline:
    1. Binary, Octal, Decimal, and Hexadecimal Number Systems
    2. Machine Architecture
    1. RISC/CISC Overview
    2. User model/supervisor model overview
    3. Execution (fetch/execute cycle)
    4. Memory and memory management
    5. Instruction pipelining, cache memory
    6.    Registers
    7. Status and control registers
    8. Addressing modes
    9.     Instructions
      1. Instruction coding
      2. Processor modes, user and privileged
      3. Defined, illegal, reserved
      4. Arithmetic
      5. Logical, shift, rotate
      6. Comparison
      7. Conditional and unconditional jumps
      8. Subroutine calls and returns
      9. Floating point
      10. Input/Output (I/0)
      11. Other instructions as appropriate
    1. Program Design
    2. The Assembler
    1. Program syntax
    2. Source creation using a text editor
    3. Translation
    4. Linking
    5. Pseudo ops
    6.    Macro definition and use
    7. Storage allocation, static and dynamic
    1. The Stack
    1. Parameter passing on the stack
    2. Calling sequences
    3. Internal and external procedures
    4. “C” language calling sequence
    1. Array Processing, Indexing
    2. Sorting
    3. Program Debugging and Testing
    4. Performance Issues (Optional)
    5. Program Profiling (Optional)
    6. Programmer Productivity Issues (Optional)


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2020
  
  •  

    CIS 265 - The C Programming Language

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Principles and syntax of ANSI Standard C and many of the common library functions. Includes writing C programs in portable code to facilitate systems programming concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 131  
    Recommendation: CIS 250 . If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the difference between ANSI C, C99, and C11.
    2. Write programs in C with various scope (local, global, and external).
    3. Write programs in C with multi-dimensional arrays.
    4. Write programs in C with pointers, and structs.
    5. Write programs using several files.
    6. Solve complex problems using C as the language for implementation.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Contrast ANSI C, C99, and C11.
    2. Discuss the syntax of the C language, including the type specifications and operators and their order of precedence.
    3. Write programs in C to demonstrate scope, multi-dimensional arrays, pointers, and structs.
    4. Contrast C with other procedural programming languages.
    5. Design solution to systems level problems using C as the language for implementation.

    Outline:
    1. History of the C language
      1. UNIX
      2. ANSI C
      3. C99
      4. C11
      5. C-based languages
    2. Syntax of the C language
      1. Constants and variables
        1. Local variables
        2. Global variables
        3. External variables
      2. Operators and expressions
        1. Precedence
        2. Associativity
      3. Control flow operators
        1. Selection statements
        2. Repetition
    3. Scope and Storage Classes in C
      1. Declarations
      2. Invocation
      3. Functions - parameter passing (by value and by reference)
    4. Typing Aspects of C
      1. Built-in types
      2. Derived types
        1. Arrays (single and double-dimensional; fixed and variable length)
        2. Structs (including anonymous)
        3. Unions (including anonymous)
        4. Singly Linked Lists
    5. Pointers
      1. Single and multiple reference levels
      2. Passing pointers as arguments
      3. Pointer arithmetic
      4. Pointers and arrays (including changes made in C11 to make pointers safer)
    6. Preprocessor
      1. Defines and macros
      2. Include files and header
    7. Input/Output
      1. Keyboard and terminal
      2. Disk I/O
      3. Formatted input/output


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    CIS 269 - Data Structures

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Advanced topics in computer science and programming in C> Includes software engineering concepts and theory, memory management, inheritance, overloading, abstract classes, review of C< stacks, queues, recursion, and dynamic abstract data structures. Also includes source control, templates, hash tables, sort and search algorithms, file handling and streams, trees, graphs and networks.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 131  or CIS 278 .


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Implement and manipulate defined composite data types and structures, classes.
    2. Design, develop, modularize, test, validate, and document program solutions to business and scientific information processing problems using top-down design, data structure, and file handling tools.
    3. Describe and code various sort and search algorithms. 
    4. Execute performance analysis and determine relative timing complexity (Bit Oh Notation) relating to the sort and search algorithms, discuss advantages and disadvantages of the above. 
    5. Describe and code various complex algorithms with memory management components, classes, and pointers.
    6. Code a breadth first and depth first algorithm.
    7. Use, create, and extend templates.
    8. Read/write to multiple file handles and streams in a program.
    9. Use a source control system such as GitHub to manage source code.

    Outline:
    1. Software Engineering Concepts and Theory
    2. Review of C++
      1. Classes, types and declarations
      2. Operators
      3. Control flow statements
      4. Pointers – single and multi-level indirection
      5. Functions – including function pointers
      6. Inheritance, overloading
      7. Abstract classes
      8. Streams and file handles.
    3. Stacks and Queues
      1. Add an element to a stack or queue
      2. Delete an element from a stack or queue
      3. Use a circular array to simulate a stack or queue
      4. Simulate a stack or queue using a linked list
      5. Stack overflow
    4. Recursion
      1. Divide and conquer
      2. Backtracking
      3. Removal of
    5. Dynamic Abstract Data Structures
      1. Linked lists – singly and doubly listed
      2. Trees
        1. Binary
        2. Binary search trees
        3. AVL trees (balanced)
    6. Sort and Search Algorithms
      1. Quick sort
      2. Merge sort
      3. Heap sort
      4. Radix sort
      5. Hash tables
      6. Introduction to the big oh notation and analysis
    7. Memory Management
      1. Destructor calling order
      2. Memory leaks
      3. Garbage collection
    8. Hash Tables
      1. Hash functions
      2. Types of hash tables
      3. Addressing schemes
      4. Analysis of complexity
    9. Templates
      1. Creating a template
      2. Extending an existing template
    10. Graphs, Trees and Networks
      1. Adjacency matrix
      2. Depth-first and breadth-first search
      3. Shortest path algorithm
    11. Source Control
      1. Retrieve source code
      2. Branches
      3. Add new source code


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
  •  

    CIS 278 - C++ and Object-Oriented Programming

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Concepts and implementation of object-oriented programming and design using C++ Includes the language syntax of C++ applications using C++ objects to solve information systems problems, and class libraries created for reuse and inheritance.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Develop programs using both C++ built-in classes and user-defined classes.
    2. Integrate the concepts of abstraction, inheritance, composition and polymorphism into C++ programs.
    3. Write programs in C++ which solve information systems problems and which show increased productivity by taking an object-oriented approach.
    4. Create and use collections (arrays and vectors) of user-defined objects.
    5. Use pointers to objects in programs.
    6. Demonstrate Class Libraries and Windows applications which are written in C++ to exploit software reuse and rapid prototyping.
    7. Use classes from the Standard Template Library in programs.
    8. Create C++ applications that write data to files and read it from them.
    9. Write C++ applications that execute SQL statements to select, insert, update and delete rows in database tables.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction and Overview
      1. Benefits of object-oriented (O-O) methods
        1. Structured vs. O-O approaches
        2. O-O design improvements
          1. Reusability
          2. Reliability
          3. Maintainability
          4. Encapsulation: integrating object state data, as represented by instance variables, with the code that operates upon it
      2. Features of object-oriented programs
        1. Strong typing and type hierarchies
        2. Classes for encapsulation and information hiding
    2. Using C++
      1. Introduction to C++
        1. Design goals of C++
        2. C++ = C + strong typing + classes
        3. C++ syntax
        4. C++ as a better C (small enhancements)
        5. C++ structs as a step on the path towards classes
        6. Classes as user-defined types in C++
      2. O-O programming in C++
        1. Using C++ built-in classes such as strings
        2. C++ types, references, and friends
        3. Object creation (constructors, copy constructors, destructors)
        4. Inheritance and derived classes
        5. Composition: using objects of other classes as instance variables within a class
        6. Dynamic storage allocation of objects
        7. Polymorphism
        8. Collections of objects
        9. Dynamic function binding using virtual and pure virtual functions
    3. Advanced C++ Features and the Future of O-O
      1. Reusable libraries
        1. Files, stream, and I/O libraries
        2. Designing a library
        3. The Standard Template Library 
          1.     Container classes            
          2.     Iterators
          3.     Algorithms                          
      2. Generic Libraries
        1. Using a container class
        2. Class categories as mechanisms
      3. Database operations                                                   
        1. Connecting to an external database                      
        2. Executing SQL statements from within a program 


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019-2020
  
  •  

    CIS 279 - Java Programming

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the Java programming language. Includes review of fundamentals; objects, classes, and methods; extending classes and overriding methods; text input and output to console; and handling events. Also includes working with GUI components and database access.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 131  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Provide examples illustrating the concepts: class variables and methods, instance variables and methods, constructors.
    2. Design, write, and test Java Applications using the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment.
    3. Develop graphical user interfaces using the current Java graphical interface classes and the Model-View-Controller design pattern.
    4. Create and Import Packages.
    5. Develop Event Handling programs.
    6. Create programs using abstract classes and interfaces.
    7. Develop a program that connects to a database and runs stored procedures

    Outline:
    1. Review of programming fundamentals
    2. Using the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment
    3. Working with Classes, Objects, and Methods
    4. Extending Classes and Overriding Methods
    5. Working with Strings
    6. Creating graphical interfaces
      1. Components
        1. Buttons
        2. Text fields
        3. Combo boxes
    7. Building graphical applications with the Model-View-Controller Design Pattern
    8. Handling Events
      1. Button Clicks
      2. Key Presses
    9. Creating and Importing Packages
    10. Using Java Database Connectivity to work with a relational database


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    CIS 280 - Systems Analysis and Design: Concepts and Tools

    3 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 2 lab periods

    Concepts of systems analysis and design for all phases of the systems development life cycle. Includes problem identification, project initiation and planning, analysis, logical design, physical design, implementation and testing, and operations and maintenance. Also includes specific tools used by systems analysts, introduction and use of CASE (computer-aided software engineering) tools, and project management software.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 131  or CIS 162 .


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the elements of the SDLC (System Development Life Cycle).
    2. Identify the major tasks of each phase of the SDLC.
    3. Explain the process of managing an information systems project.

    Outline:
    1. Systems Development Overview
      1. Types of information systems
      2. Systems development life cycle (SDLC)
    2. The Systems Analyst
      1. Skills of systems analysts
      2. Systems analysis as a profession
    3. Information Systems Project Management
      1. Project management
      2. Project planning
      3. Critical path scheduling
      4. Gantt and PERT charts
    4. Overview of CASE Tools
      1. CASE tools and the SDLC
      2. CASE tool types
    5. Selecting Information Systems Projects
      1. The project identification and selection process
      2. Relationship between corporate strategic planning IS planning
    6. Planning Systems Development Projects
      1. Feasibility studies
      2. Cost-benefit analysis
    7. Determining System Requirements
      1. Interviews
      2. Questionnaires
      3. Automated data collection
      4. Joint application design
    8. Process Modeling: Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs)
    9. Logic Modeling: Decision Tables and Trees
    10. Conceptual Data Modeling: Entity Relationship (E-R) Diagrams
    11. Selecting Alternative Designs
    12. Rapid Application Development
    13. Designing Forms and Reports Design
    14. User Interface Design
    15. Logical Database Design
    16. Physical Database Design
    17. Program and Process Design
      1. Coupling and cohesion
    18. Representing Logic with Pseudocode
    19. Distributed System Design
    20. System Implementation
      1. Coding, testing, and conversion
      2. Test planning
      3. Installation strategies
    21. System Maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
  •  

    CIS 281 - Systems Analysis and Design: Applications

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Systems analysis concepts applied to specific software projects. Includes completing a software project from beginning to end, from problem identification to project implementation, using current methodologies and appropriate software development tools.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 280  


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Build a software prototype that solves real-world problems.
    2. Deliver a presentation that solves a real-world problem including the deliverables from each phase of SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle).

    Outline:
    1. Review of Concepts and Tools of Systems Analysis and Design
    2. Project Selection
    3. Project Planning
    4. Analysis
    1. Process Model Using DFDs              
    2. Data Model Using E-R Diagrams
    3. Object-Oriented Modeling
    1. Design
    1. Complete Design-Phase Diagrams
    2. Database Design
    3. Security Considerations
    1. Prototyping
    2. Implementation and Testing
    3. Maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/2020
  
  •  

    CIS 283 - Advanced Python

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Advanced features of the Python programming language. Includes object-oriented programming, database access, GUI development with Tkinter, and web applications.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 185 


  
  •  

    CIS 284 - Cybersecurity Capstone

    1-3 Credits, 1.5-5.0 Contact Hours
    .5-1 lecture periods 1-4 lab period

    Capstone experience for the CyberSecurity Associate of Applied Science. Provides an opportunity to reflect on and integrate the knowledge gained from previous courses into a final hands-on project.

    Information: Course activities may take place in a simulated work setting.



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1.        Develop and execute a systematic penetration test into a prescribed system.

    2.        Integrate data from multiple sources in order to critique a business IT security state and produce remediation recommendations.


    Outline:
    1. Project Management
      1. Timeline
      2. Tasks
    2. Perform Penetration Test of a Predetermined System
      1. Perform target reconnaissance
      2. Exploit target system(s)
      3. Develop customer report and recommendations
    3. Post-Incident Response (Defender)
      1. Identify incident source and impact
      2. Remediate vulnerabilities
      3. Complete incident response report


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20

  
  •  

    CIS 288 - Fundamentals of Cybersecurity

    4 Credits, 4 Contact Hours
    4 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to cyber security policy, doctrine, and operational constraints. Includes a broad survey of networking principles, cybersecurity concepts, tools, technologies, and best practices. Also includes hands-on activities to enhance familiarity with networking concepts and practice cybersecurity techniques and procedures.

    Information: This course is designed to meet the University of Arizona South CYBV 301 requirement and is preparatory coursework for the UA South Cyber Operations program. Please see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Compare the different types of cyberattacks.
    2. Explain the major U.S, and International laws governing cyberspace, the restrictions they place on cyber operations, and how they impact an organization’s overall cyber defensive strategy.
    3. Describe the concepts and best practices of a Defense in Depth strategy.
    4. Explain the Vulnerability-Threat-Control Paradigm.
    5. Describe Confidentiality-Integrity-Availability (C-I-A) security triad.
    6. Explain the similarities and differences between OSI and TCP/IP Model.
    7. Explain security shortcomings and flaws in networking hardware and devices.
    8. Demonstrate methods to secure infrastructure, hosts, networks, and the perimeter.

    Performance Objectives:
    1. Define and explain the Vulnerability-Threat-Control Paradigm.
    2. Identify and describe the trade-offs in the (CIA) Confidentiality-Integrity-Availability security triad.
    3. Identify and describe the concepts and best practices of a Defense in Depth strategy.
    4. Identify and describe the types of malware, how malware spreads, and how to mitigate its effects.
    5. Identify and describe the types of networks to include LAN, WAN, MAN, PAN, NAN, WLAN, and the internet. 
    6. Describe and explain the capabilities, characteristics and security flaws of network hardware devices and their operating systems.
    7. Identify and explain how to design basic network architectures.
    8. Identify and explain the similarities and differences between the OSI & the TCP/IP Model.
    9. Identify and describe the basic functions, uses, and characteristics of network protocols.
    10. Identify and describe the history and fundamentals of cryptography.
    11. Identify and describe the different types of cyberattacks.
    12. Describe and explain the active cyber defense cycle’s techniques and mitigation strategies.
    13. Identify and explain the major U.S, and International laws governing cyberspace, the restrictions they place on cyber operations, and how they can impact an organizations overall defensive strategy.

    Outline:
    1. Vulnerability-Threat-Control Paradigm
      1. Vulnerability-Threat-Control Paradigm
      2. CIA triad
      3. Types of threats and threat actors
      4. Threat Method-Opportunity-Motive
      5. Identify and mitigate harm through risk management
      6. Concepts and best practices of a Defense in Depth strategy
        1. Uniform Protection
        2. Protected Enclaves
        3. Information Centric
        4. Threat Vector Analysis
    2. Viruses, Worms, Trojans & other Malware
      1. Types of malware, how it spreads
        1. Viruses
        2. Worms
        3. Trojans
        4. Ransomware
      2. Capabilities and goals of different types of malware
        1. Data harvesting
        2. Unauthorized system access
        3. Denial of Service, Distributed Denial of Service (DOS, DDOS) and its effects on availability
        4. Data destruction
      3. Malware mitigation and prevention strategies
        1. System scanning and monitoring
        2. Data integrity checks
        3. Program execution blocking
        4. System patching & hardening
        5. User education and security culture (e.g., social engineering techniques)
    3. Network Fundamentals
      1. Types of networks to include LAN, WAN, MAN, PAN, NAN, WLAN, and the Internet
      2. Capabilities, characteristics and security limitations of network hardware devices and their operating systems
        1. Hubs
        2. Bridges
        3. Switches
        4. Routers
        5. Firewalls
      3. Techniques, methods, and systems for fighting malware
        1. Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
        2. Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS)
        3. Honeypots
      4. Designing basic network architectures

    a.   Identifying functionality

    b.   modularity of design

    c.   hierarchical design principles in network architectures

    d.   using VLANs (virtual local area networks) to limit broadcasts

    1. Protocol Stacks and IP Concepts  
      1. Introduction and Use of the 7-layered Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model for Networking
        1. Physical Layer
        2. Data Link Layer
        3. Network Layer
        4. Transport Layer
        5. Session Layer
        6. Presentation Layer
        7. Application Layer
      2. Relation of the 7-layered OSI Model to the four layers of the TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) Model
      3. Protocol functions, uses, and their operation in the OSI Model
        1. Media Access Control (MAC) Addressing in local area networks
        2. ARP (Address Resolution Protocol)
        3. Internet Protocol (IP)
        4. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
        5. User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
        6. Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
        7. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
        8. Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)
      4. Similarities and differences between the IPv4 vs. IPv6 standards.
      5. Function of the Domain Name System (DNS) and its support of network communications.
    2. Cryptography & Securing data at rest and on the move
      1. History and fundamentals of cryptography
        1. Communications challenges and cryptographic goals
        2. Plain text vs. Cipher text
        3. History
        4. Ciphers and Cryptanalysis systems
        5. One-Time Pads
        6. Cryptography vs. Cryptology
        7. Cryptosystems
        8. Keys
        9. Key Exchange and Protection
      2. Define and explain the types of Cryptographic Systems
        1. Symmetric Encryption (Private Key Encryption)
        2. Asymmetric Encryption (Public Key Encryption)
        3. Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange
        4. Hash Functions
        5. Digital Signatures
      3. Major capabilities, limitations, characteristics, and usages of the Data Encryption Standard (DES), Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), RSA, Elliptic Curve, MD5, and SHA-1/2/256/512 crypto algorithms.
      4. Capabilities, characteristics, and security vulnerabilities presented by Steganography techniques and tools.
        1. History of steganography
        2. Steganography techniques
        3. Open-Source tools for studying steganography
    1. S-Tools
    2. OpenPuff
    1. Cyber Attacks, Defenses, and Law
      1. Classification of Cyber Attacks
        1. Network based attacks
        2. Client side attacks
        3. Social Engineering attacks
    2. Active cyber defense cycle’s techniques and mitigation strategies
      1. Proper network architectures
      2. Implementation of passive defenses
      3. Cyber Threat Intelligence (CTI)
      4. Network Security Monitoring (NSM)
      5. Incident Response (IR)
      6. Threat and Environment Manipulation (TEM)
    3. Introduction to U.S. Federal/State laws governing cyberspace, and relating these laws to international laws.
      1. Restrictions on cyber operations
      2. Organizational impact
      3. Organizational defensive strategies


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2020/21
  
  •  

    CIS 299 - Advanced Co-op: Computer Information Systems

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    A supervised cooperative work program for students in related occupation area. Teacher-coordinators work with students and their supervisors. Variable credit is available by special arrangement.

    Corequisite(s): CIS 299WK  
    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of two credit hours. If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the need for skills in oral and written communication and the importance to job success.
    2. Describe the techniques for managing time and energy for job efficiency.
    3. Identify stress in work situations and begin to develop techniques for coping with stress.
    4. Find and related information on some career field to career goals.
    5. Write a resume and plan an employment interview (real or simulated) and observe (real or filmed) or successfully complete such experiences (s), where available.
    6. Identify some basic principles and theories learned in courses completed, and apply them to problems encountered in real work situations.
    7. Identify problems which arise in work situations and develop some techniques for successful solution to them.

    Outline:
    1. Communication Skills
    1. Importance in job success
    2. Oral skills developed
    3. Written skills developed
    1. Time and Energy Management
    1. Identifying resources and their uses
    2. Techniques for managing, for job efficiency
    1. Stress and Its Management
    1. Types of job stress
    2. Causes of stress
    3. Characteristics of stress
    4. Techniques for managing job stress
    1. Careers: Information and Its Uses
    1. Review of careers in field of study
    2. Sources of career information
    3. Uses of career information
    4. Career objectives
    5. Career plans
    1. Placing Yourself on the Job Market
    1. Identifying varied job markets
    2. Selecting job markets appropriate to your potential
    3. Aspects of presenting oneself on the market
    1. Job information
    2. Resume writing
    3. Backing up the resume
    4. References
    5. The interview
    1. Principles, Theories, and Practices in the Career Field
    1. Application in the work situation
    2. Ongoing discussion
    3. Understanding through application
    1. Problems in the Work Situation
    1. Problem (types) identified
    2. Ways of dealing with problems encountered – ongoing discussion each session


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010
  
  •  

    CIS 299WK - Adv Co-op Work: Comp Info Sys

    1-8 Credits, 5-40 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 5-40 lab periods

    Advanced Co-op Work: Computer Information Systems Introduction to Cooperative Education for second-year students (instruction which provides for success in securing and retaining a training job related to subject area). Includes communication skills, time and energy management, stress and its management, careers: information and its uses, job market, principles, theories, and practices in the career field, and problems in the work situation.

    Corequisite(s): CIS 299
    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of sixteen credit hours. If this course is repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.


    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply some of the principles, knowledge, and skills learned in classroom and laboratory in real work situations.
    2. Demonstrate improved skills, competence, and levels of accuracy in handling responsibility and work assignments.
    3. Demonstrate improved self-confidence in handling work assignments.
    4. Demonstrate skills in managing human relations: peers (children, customers, clients, etc.) and supervisors.
    5. Deal responsibly with the world of work: reporting promptly and management of time, energy, and stress.
    6. Demonstrate improved understanding of the career field.

    Outline:
    Students are assigned to work (5 hours per credit per week) in a selected field experience job, which is appropriate to their program of study and their level of readiness to enter the world of work.  They will meet with the instructor and on-site supervisor to enhance growth and evaluate progress.  Weekly seminars with other students in the Cooperative Education/field experience or practicum will provide further insights and growth.  Evaluation will be based on each student’s planned objectives and activities for the experience.

    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010