Dec 02, 2021  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog
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CHM 121IN - Chemistry and Society

4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
3 lecture periods 3 lab periods

Basic chemistry and its relationship to everyday experiences. Includes classification and structure of matter; radioactivity; compound formation from elements; and electron transfer. Also includes acids, bases, salts, the liquid state, the gas state, and special topics.

Information: Designed for non-science majors, education majors, and the general public.
Gen-Ed: Meets AGEC - SCI; Meets CTE - M&S.




Course Learning Outcomes
  1. Classify samples of matter as an element, compound or mixture; all with an intrinsic atomic nature.
  2. Discuss current science problems and potential problems of the future.
  3. Describe and apply the process by which “science” investigates the world around us and adds to our body of knowledge.

Performance Objectives:
  1. Classify samples of matter as an element, compound or mixture; all with an intrinsic atomic nature.
  2. Describe the arrangement of the basic subatomic particles within the atom which lead to differences in mass, stability, and reactivity of the elements.
  3. Describe radioactivity in terms of atomic nuclear decay; and the measurement and societal impact of this phenomenon.
  4. Distinguish metals and non-metals and their “outer shell” or “valence” electronic environment by using the periodic table of elements.
  5. Relate electricity to the transfer of electrons from one substance to another, and apply this phenomenon to common oxidative processes and the operation of batteries.
  6. Classify certain substances as acids, bases, and salts; identify these compounds among commonly encountered household materials, and relate each to the pH scale.
  7. Use water to describe the liquid state, including the impact on its properties as solutes and contaminants are added.
  8. Use air to describe the gas state, including its composition in the atmosphere, and the societal impact of pollutants which alter its composition.
  9. Describe environmental aspects of chemistry in the local, state, regional, national, and international realms.
  10. Discuss current science problems and potential problems of the future.
  11. Describe and apply the process by which “science” investigates the world around us and adds to our body of knowledge.

Outline:
  1. Classification and Structure of Matter
    1. Atomic, ionic, or molecular nature of all material
    2. Atomic structure
    3. Electronic arrangement
  2. Radioactivity
    1. Nuclear decay, radiation types
    2. Power source
    3. Societal implications, current usage
  3. Compound Formation from Elements
    1. The Periodic Table of Elements
    2. Metals and non-metals; their valence electrons, and periodic perspective
    3. Atomic elements to ionic or molecular compounds; electron transfer and sharing
  4. Electron Transfer: Electricity, Oxidation and Reduction
    1. The electrochemical cell
    2. Construction of batteries
    3. Corrosion, rust, and bleaching
  5. Acids, Bases and Salts
    1. Definition and reaction with indicator dyes
    2. pH Scale
    3. Common acids and bases; and their relative strengths
    4. “Acid Rain”
  6. The Liquid State
    1. Water and its unique properties
    2. Solutions and solubility
    3. Contaminants and purification
  7. The Gas State
    1. Comparison to solid, liquid states: particle density
    2. Effects of temperature and pressure on volume
    3. The atmosphere and atmospheric pressure
    4. Modeling the gaseous state
  8. Special Topics (Selected by Instructor as Relevant to Course Content)


Effective Term:
Fall 2016



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