Jan 23, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


Legend for Courses

HC/HN: Honors Course  IN/IH: Integrated lecture/lab  LB: Lab  LC: Clinical Lab  LS: Skills Lab  WK: Co-op Work
SUN#: is a prefix and number assigned to certain courses that represent course equivalency at all Arizona community colleges and the three public universities. Learn more at www.aztransfer.com/sun.

 

Building and Construction Technology

  
  •  

    BCT 100 - Professionalism in Service for BCT

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Procedures in business and customer service. Includes an introduction to professionalism, self-evaluation, service routine, addressing dissatisfied customers, and problem situations.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss potential areas of improvement regarding personal motivation and professional behavior.
    2. Describe professional mannerisms into service routines to promote maximum customer comfort.
    3. Explain work routine procedures.
    4. Solve problems in dealing with a dissatisfied customer.
    5. Compare problem situations.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Professionalism
      1. Professionalism
      2. Knowledge
    2. Self Evaluation
      1. Proper uniform
      2. Neat and clean
      3. Offensive behavior to a customer
      4. Company vehicle clean and properly identified
      5. Tool organization and repair
      6. Respect the Customer’s Property
      7. Criticizing a competitor
      8. Being professional and courteous
    3. Service Routine
      1. Scheduling service calls
      2. Courtesy
      3. First impression
      4. Respect for a customer’s property
    4. Dealing with a Dissatisfied Customer
      1. Show concern
      2. Listen to the entire problem
      3. Apologize for any inconvenience
    5. Problem Situations
      1. Sell yourself first and the service or product second
      2. Be an equipment consultant to the customer
      3. Build a bond with the customer


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010
  
  •  

    BCT 101 - Principles of Construction

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to the principles of construction. Includes the building delivery process, government constraints, green building and sustainable design, calculating loads and resistance factors, and composition, closing process, codes, and Green Building Certification and Award.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the building delivery process and how buildings come into being and with identification of the key players in the process.
    2. Describe governmental constraints on construction.
    3. Apply and use Green Building fundamentals, addressing sustainability and design in the Green Building Industry.
    4. Calculate loads, resistance, and factors that affect building.
    5. Classify soils and their properties, sampling, compaction, and use in the early construction phase.
    6. Describe the construction process followed from concept to turn over.
    7. Identify most materials used in the building process along with composition and best choice use.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to explain the closing process, from final inspection, codes, Green Building Certification, and Award.

    Outline:
    1. Overview of the Building Delivery Process
      1. Project delivery phase
      2. Pre-design phase
      3. Preconstruction (bid negotiation) phase
      4. Design phase
      5. Construction phase
      6. Contract phase
      7. Post Construction phase
      8. Design build phase
    2. Governmental Constraints on Construction   
      1. Objectives of a building code
      2. Enforcement of a building code
      3. Prescriptive and performance code
      4. Model code
      5. Application of a building code
      6. Construction Standards
      7. Zoning ordinance
      8. Principles in practice
    3. Green Building Fundamentals, Sustainability, and the Building Industry
      1. Triple bottom line
      2. Environmental imperative
      3. Economic imperative
      4. Social imperative
      5. Sustainable Design and Green Building
      6. Sustainable design practices
      7. Benefits of sustainable designed projects
      8. Designing high-efficiency buildings
      9. References and resources
    4. Loads on buildings
      1. Dead loads
      2. Live loads
      3. Wind loads
      4. Factors that affect wind loads
      5. Roof loads
    5. Soils:  Foundation and Basement Construction 
      1. Classification of soils
      2. Soil samples and testing
      3. Earthwork and excavation
      4. Foundation systems
    6. Construction Building Process from Concept to Turn Over
      1. Planning
      2. Negotiation
      3. Excavation
      4. Site Development
      5. Schedules
      6. Forced-majeure
      7. Turn Over
    7. Building Materials, Choice, Composition, and Specifications
      1. Soils for compaction
      2. Re-enforcement
      3. Concrete and masonry
      4. Wood
      5. Roofing
      6. Windows
      7. Plumbing
      8. Electrical
      9. Mechanical
      10. Fasteners
      11. Paint
      12. Cladding
      13. Doors:  interior, exterior, and garage
      14. Hardware including smoke and gas detection alarms
      15. Landscaping
      16. Interior and exterior materials
      17. Steel
      18. Flooring
      19. Fixtures
      20. Window coverings
      21. Cabinets
      22. Counters
      23. Appliances
      24. Ductwork
      25. Insulation
      26. Sinks, showers, and tubs
    8. Closing Process
      1. Final inspection
      2. Code compliance
      3. Green sustainable materials and building compliance for certification and award


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010
  
  •  

    BCT 102 - Building Materials

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Construction standards and specific types of building materials used in commercial, industrial, residential and private construction projects. Includes beginning construction standards, site work, concrete, masonry, metals, wood and wood products, thermal and moisture protection, doors and windows, finishes, specialties, equipment, furnishings, special construction, conveying systems, mechanical systems, and electrical systems.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to converse, relate and follow construction industry standards.
    2. Discuss the process commonly used in the construction of site work.
    3. Describe the components of concrete construction and differentiate masonry construction methods and materials.
    4. Interpret designations used for metals and discuss wood construction and pertinent code requirements.
    5. Discuss common methods and applications of thermal and moisture protection and explain door and window assemblies used in construction.
    6. Discuss commonly used finishes in a variety of residential and commercial applications and discuss selection criteria for furnishings used in construction design.
    7. Explain and discuss specialty options used on building projects.
    8. Communicate the importance and implications of selecting pneumatics and tool service on construction projects and Demonstrate awareness of conveying system options used in construction projects.
    9. Determine best choice usage of heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and plumbing systems and discuss material selections for electrical systems.

    Outline:
    1. Construction Standards
      1. Industry standards
      2. Local standards
    2. Sitework
      1. Soils
      2. Paving
      3. Drainage
      4. Landscape materials
    3. Concrete
      1. Mix designs
      2. Accessories
    4. Masonry
      1. Wall types
      2. Accessories
    5. Metals
      1. Structural steel
      2. Connections
      3. Constructural metals
    6. Wood and Wood Products
      1. Material characteristics
      2. Uses
    7. Thermal and Moisture Protection
      1. Insulation
      2. Roofing materials
      3. Damp-proofing and waterproofing
    8. Doors and Windows
      1. Door choices
      2. Window options
    9. Finishes
      1. Paints
      2. Plastics
    10. Specialties
      1. Grilles and screens
      2. Partitions
      3. Accessories
    11. Equipment
      1. Pneumatic equipment
      2. Food service equipment
    12. Furnishings
      1. Casework
      2. Furniture
    13. Special Construction
      1. Acoustic Facilities
      2. Solar energy systems
    14. Conveying Systems
      1. Elevators
      2. Material handling systems
    15. Mechanical Systems
      1. Heating, vacuum, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems
      2. Plumbing systems
      3. Fire protection systems
    16. Electrical Systems
      1. Power systems
      2. Lighting systems
      3. Communications systems


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019-2020
  
  •  

    BCT 104 - Introduction to Equipment Maintenance

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Procedures and concepts for maintaining buildings in a commercial/industrial setting. Includes preventative maintenance requirements, maintenance terminology, industrial tool use, electrical equipment maintenance, electrical feed, bearing applications, sheaves applications, flexible drives and V-belts, centrifugal pump maintenance, vacuum pump maintenance, fire suppressant system maintenance and repair, metal fabrication, steel pipe plumbing, as-built print reading, lubricants, and interior wall frame/ construction.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 132  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes

    1.      Discuss proper maintenance requirements.

    2.      Use precision measurement instruments.

    3.      Use industrial tools in the facility fields

    4.      Demonstrate how to make a gasket.

    5.      Use math formulas to solve basic trades problems.

    6.      Explain the basic layout of a construction print.

    7.      Discuss the maintenance of pumps and drivers.

    8.      Demonstrate the use of test instruments.


    Outline:

    I.        Maintenance Requirements

    A.     Preventive

    B.     Predictive

    II.       Precision Measurement Instruments

    A.     Calipers

    B.     Micrometers

    C.     Gauges

    III.      Tools of the Trade

    A.     Chain and strap wrench

    B.     Taps and dies

    C.     Hand and power threader

    IV.      Fasteners and Anchors

    A.     Blind rivet

    B.     Concrete anchor

    V.      Cutting Metal

    A.     Safety

    B.     Equipment

    C.     Tools

    VI.      Gaskets and Packing

    A.     Identify types and parts

    B.     Material

    C.     O-rings

    D.     Characteristics

    E.     Making

    VII.     Craft Related Mathematics

    A.     Weights and measurements

    B.     Formulas

    C.     Calculating volume

    D.     Calculating circumference 

    VIII.    Construction Drawings

    A.     Identify layouts

    B.     Title block

    C.     Lines and symbols

    IX.      Pumps and Drivers

    A.     Identify major components

    B.     Identify and use proper hand tools

    X.      Valves

    A.     Identify major components

    B.     Disassemble

    C.     Reassemble

    D.     Identify and use proper hand tools

    XI.      Test Instruments

    A.     Tachometer

    B.     Multimeter

    C.     Infrared thermometer

    XII.     Lubricants

    A.     Industrial applications

    B.     Scheduling

    C.     Tools and equipment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019-2020
  
  •  

    BCT 105 - Professionalism in Service, Construction Math, Basic Rigging

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Concepts, procedures and techniques in service, construction math, and rigging. Includes an introduction to professionalism, self-evaluation, service routine, addressing dissatisfied customers, and problem situations. Includes basic mathematics concepts and employability in the construction industry. Also includes how to safely handle and use rigging equipment.

    Information: Equivalent to BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe and explain professional mannerisms and behavior.
    2. Work with fractions and decimals, and apply basic geometry to measure the basic shapes used in the construction industry.
    3. Interpret information and instructions presented in both written and verbal form, and describe effective communication and professional relationship skills.
    4. Identify and describe the use and proper inspection procedures for rigging equipment.
    5. Discuss proper handling techniques for hazardous materials.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Professionalism
      1. Professionalism
      2. Knowledge
    2. Self Evaluation
      1. Proper uniform
      2. Neat and clean
      3. Offensive behavior to a customer
      4. Company vehicle clean and properly identified
      5. Tool organization and repair
      6. Respect the customer’s property
      7. Criticizing a competitor
      8. Being professional and courteous
    3. Service Routine
      1. Scheduling service calls
      2. Courtesy
      3. First impression
      4. Respect for a customer’s property
    4. Dealing with a Dissatisfied Customer
      1. Show concern
      2. Listen to the entire problem
      3. Apologize for any inconvenience
    5. Problem Situations
      1. Sell yourself first and the service or product second
      2. Be an equipment consultant to the customer
      3. Build a bond with the customer
    6. Whole Numbers
      1. Parts of a whole number
      2. Adding whole numbers
      3. Subtracting whole numbers
      4. Multiplying simple whole numbers
      5. Dividing whole numbers
      6. Using the calculator to add, subtract. multiply, and divide whole numbers
    7. Measurements
      1. Using the standard ruler
      2. Architect’s scale
    8. Fractions
      1. Finding equivalent fractions
      2. Reducing fractions to their lowest term
      3. Comparing fractions and finding the lowest common denominator
      4. Adding fractions
      5. Subtracting fractions
      6. Multiplying fractions
      7. Dividing fractions
    9. Decimals
      1. Reading a machinist’s rule
      2. Comparing whole numbers with decimals
      3. Comparing decimals with decimals
      4. Adding and subtracting decimals
      5. Multiplying decimals
      6. Dividing with decimals
      7. Rounding with decimals
      8. Using the calculator to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals
    10. Conversion Process
      1. Converting decimals to percentages and percentages to decimals
      2. Converting fractions to decimals
      3. Converting decimals to fractions
      4. Converting inches to decimal equivalents in feet
    11. Metric System
      1. Units of weight, length, volume, and temperature
      2. Using the metric ruler
      3. Converting measurements
    12. Construction Geometry
      1. Angles
      2. Shapes
      3. Areas of shapes
      4. Volume of shapes
    13. Reading and Writing Skills
      1. Reading on the job
      2. Writing on the job
    14. Listening and Speaking Skills
      1. Active listening on the job
      2. Speaking on the job
    15. Employability in the Construction Business
      1. Entering the construction workforce
      2. Entrepreneurship
    16. Critical Thinking Skills
      1. Barriers to problem solving
      2. Solving problems using critical thinking skills
      3. Problems with planning and scheduling
    17. Computer Skills
      1. Computer terms
      2. Basic software packages
      3. Electronic mail (email)
      4. Computers in the construction industry
    18. Relationship Skills
      1. Self-presentation skills
      2. Conflict resolution
      3. Giving and receiving criticism
      4. Teamwork skills
      5. Leadership skills
    19. Workplace Issues
      1. Harassment
      2. Stress
      3. Drugs and alcohol abuse
    20. Rigging Safety
      1. Rules
      2. Procedures
    21. Rigging Equipment
      1. Wire rope
      2. Eye splice
      3. Thimbles
      4. Shackles
      5. Sockets
      6. Wedge sockets
      7. Wire rope clips
      8. Wire rope slings
      9. Bridle slings
      10. Choker hitch slings
      11. Basket hitch slings
      12. Synthetic web slings
      13. Choker slings
      14. Basket slings
      15. Fiber ropes
    22. Inspection
      1. Wire ropes
      2. Synthetic web slings
      3. Hooks, shackles and sockets
      4. Equipment to be rigged
    23. Crane Hand Signals
      1. Crawler and telescoping boom cranes
        1. Raise load
        2. Raise load slowly
        3. Lower load
        4. Lower load slowly
        5. Raise boom
        6. Raise boom slowly
        7. Lower boom
        8. Lower boom slowly
        9. Raise boom, lower load
        10. Lower boom, raise load
        11. Raise boom, hold load
        12. Swing boom
        13. Stop
        14. Other
      2. Tower and Gantry Cranes
        1. Travel bridge
        2. Travel trolley
        3. Stop
        4. Emergency stop
        5. Select trolley
    24. Estimating an Object
      1. Size
      2. Weight
      3. Center of gravity
    25. Common Rope Knots
      1. Bowline
      2. Running bowline
      3. Timber hitch
      4. Half hitch
      5. Square
      6. Clove hitch
      7. Barrel hitch
    26. Types of Derricks
      1. A-Frame
      2. Gin pole
      3. Guyed
      4. Stiff leg
      5. Chicago boom
    27. Types of Cranes
      1. Crawler
      2. Truck mounted
      3. Truck mounted hydraulic
      4. Gantry mounted
      5. Tower mounted
      6. Hammerhead
      7. Cherry picker
      8. Drott
    28. Rigging and Moving Equipment Use
      1. Safety rules
      2. Procedures
    29. Material Handling
      1. Hazards
      2. Safe Techniques and procedures
      3. Equipment


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
  •  

    BCT 106 - Soldering and Brazing for BCT

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Principles and technologies of joining different types of alloys by braze welding and soldering. Includes safety and health, procedures and design, pre-cleaning and surface preparation, filler metals, fluxes and atmospheres, torch brazing, pipe and tube, copper, and cast iron.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115  substitute for BCT 105 , BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the process principles, definitions, and factors controlling the properties of brazing and soldering.
    2. Demonstrate safety precautions related to braze welding and soldering processes.
    3. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the braze and soldering processes, uses of equipment, materials, metallurgical considerations, and applications.
    4. Discuss the proper selection of base metal, filler metal, joint design, and joint fit-up.
    5. Prepare, clean, and assemble correctly specified joints to be brazed or soldered.
    6. Select the correct type of filler material for the projects.
    7. Demonstrate torch brazing and soldering techniques and discuss safe applications.
    8. Fabricate pipe and tube connections.
    9. Describe the correct application for the copper/copper alloys projects.

    Outline:

    I.        Introduction

    A.     Process principles and definitions

    B.     Factors controlling the properties of the brazing and soldering

    II.       Safety and Health

    A.     General area safe practice

    B.     Protection of personnel

    C.     Fire prevention and protection

    D.     Handling of compressed gases

    E.     Brazing and soldering equipment safety

    III.      Braze Welding and Soldering Procedures

    A.     Advantages and disadvantages

    B.     Equipment and materials

    C.     Metallurgical considerations

    D.     General process applications

    E.     Braze welding and soldering procedures

    IV.      Brazing and Soldering Design

    A.     Selection of base metal

    B.     Selection of filler metal with respect to joint design

    C.     Types of joints

    D.     Joint fit-up

    V.      Pre-cleaning and Surface Preparation

    A.     Chemical cleaning

    B.     Mechanical cleaning

    C.     Braze flow inhibitors

    D.     Maintaining cleanliness

    VI.      Brazing and Soldering Filler Metals

    A.     Definition and general characteristics

    B.     Melting of filler materials

    C.     Filler metal classifications

    VII.     Fluxes and Atmospheres

    A.     Fluxes

    B.     Controlled atmospheres

    C.     References

    VIII.    Torch Brazing and Soldering

    A.     Applications

    B.     Equipment and fuel gases

    C.     Process techniques

    IX.      Pipe and Tube

    A.     Cutting and sizing

    B.     Pre-cleaning

    C.     Assembly

    D.     Applying heat and filler metals

    X.      Copper and Copper Alloys

    A.     Types of base metals

    B.     Types of filler metals

    C.     Pre-cleaning and surface preparation

    D.     Safety

    XI.      Cast Iron Brazing

    A.     Preparation of cast iron for brazing

    B.     Metallurgical considerations

    C.     Brazing process

    D.     Dissimilar metals brazing


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019-2020
  
  •  

    BCT 107 - Basic Safety, Hand & Power Tools, Blueprint Reading

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Introduction to federal safety standards, tools, and blueprint reading in the construction industry. Includes employer responsibility-employee right to know, personal protective equipment, material handling, hand and power tools, electrical hazards, hazards communication standards, fire safety, scaffolds, and fall protection. Also includes basic concepts in blueprint reading terminology, components, lines, locations, dimensions, production techniques, parts, and locations.

    Information: Equivalent to BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe, identify, and explain industry standard safety practices and procedures.
    2. Demonstrate the proper use of select hand tools.
    3. Demonstrate the proper use of select power tools.
    4. Identify, list, describe, and relate basic blueprint terms, symbols, line types and abbreviations.

    Outline:
    1. Employer Responsibility-Employee Right to Know
      1. Unsafe conditions
      2. Regulations
      3. Hazards
      4. Exposure
      5. Accident prevention
    2. Personal Protective Equipment
      1. Eye protection
      2. Hand protection
      3. Foot protection
      4. Head protection
      5. Clothing
      6. Skin protection
      7. Breathing-respiratory
      8. Fall protection
      9. Hearing protection
    3. Material Handling
      1. Signaling
      2. Barricades
      3. Storage
      4. Housekeeping
      5. Rigging
      6. Hazardous materials
    4. Hand and Power Tools
      1. Hand tools
        1. Wrenches
        2. Saws
        3. Pliers
        4. Screw drivers
        5. Hammers
        6. Files
        7. Knives
      2. Power tools
        1. Electric power tools
        2. Pneumatic power tools
        3. Fuel powered tools
        4. Hydraulic power tools
        5. Powder-actuated tools
        6. Abrasive tools
        7. Woodworking tools
    5. Electrical Hazards
      1. Lock-out/tag-out
      2. Static and dynamic electricity
      3. Current and conducting
      4. Circuits
      5. Training
      6. Amperes
      7. Volts
      8. Resistance
      9. Electric shock
    6. Hazards Communication Standards (HAZCOM)
      1. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
      2. Worker responsibilities under HAZCOM
    7. Fire Safety
      1. Fire prevention guidelines
      2. How fires start
      3. Fire prevention
        1. Flammable and combustible liquids
        2. Flammable gasses
        3. Ordinary combustibles
        4. Other
      4. Fire fighting
        1. Classes of fires
        2. Other
    8. Scaffolds
      1. Erectors and dismantlers
      2. Capacity
      3. Scaffold platform construction
      4. Criteria for supported scaffolds
      5. Suspension scaffolds
      6. Access
      7. Fall protection (belts, lanyards, guard rails, toe boards)
      8. Cross bracing
      9. Midrails
    9. Fall Protection
      1. Training requirements
      2. Controlled access zones
      3. Safety monitoring systems
      4. Guidelines for fall arrest systems
      5. Guardrail/covers
      6. Connecting activity
      7. Positioning device systems
      8. Deceleration device
      9. Fall protection plan
      10. Protection from falling objects
      11. Safety net
    10. Cranes
      1. Operator error
      2. Site conditions
      3. Mechanical failure
      4. Structural failure
      5. Rigging failure
      6. Crane signal/radio communication failure
      7. Derricks
      8. Hand signals
      9. Wire rope
      10. Platform
      11. Transit
      12. Overhead hazards
    11. Stairways and ladders
      1. Risers
      2. Platform/landing
      3. Stair rails and handrails
      4. Midrails
      5. Ladder loads
      6. Rungs
      7. Cleats
      8. Spreaders
      9. Cages for fixed ladder
      10. Training requirements
      11. Ansi guidelines
    12. Trade Terms
      1. Hand tools
        1. Alloy
        2. Beveled
        3. Dropped-forged
        4. Kerf
        5. Plumb
        6. Other
      2. Power tools
        1. Ground fault protection
        2. Electric
        3. Hydraulic
        4. Pneumatic
        5. Powder (explosive)
        6. Revolutions Per Minute (RPM)
        7. Tempered
        8. Other
    13. Hand Tool Use
      1. Selection
        1. Hammers
          1. Claw
          2. Ball peen
        2. Screwdrivers
          1. Slotted 
          2. Phillips
        3. Sledgehammers
          1. Double face
          2. Cross peen
        4. Ripping bars and nail pullers
        5. Wrenches
          1. Adjustable
          2. Nonadjustable
        6. Pliers and wire cutters
          1. Slip-joint
          2. Long-nose
          3. Lineman
        7. Levels
        8. Squares
          1. Framing
          2. Combination
        9. Rulers and measuring tapes
        10. Vises and clamps
          1. Bench vise
          2. C-clamp
        11. Saws
          1. Crosscut
          2. Rip
        12. Files, chisels and punches
        13. Plumb bob
        14. Sockets and ratchets
      2. Safe use
      3. Maintenance
    14. Power Tool Use
      1. Selection
        1. Drills
          1. Electric
          2. Cordless
          3. Hammer
          4. Electro-magnetic
          5. Pneumatic
        2. Saws
          1. Circular
          2. Saber
          3. Reciprocating
          4. Band
          5. Jig
        3. Grinders and sanders
          1. Angle
          2. End
          3. Bench
        4. Miscellaneous
          1. Jackhammer
          2. Porta-power
          3. Powder actuated
      2. Safe use
      3. Maintenance
    15. Terms and Symbols
      1. Working drawings
      2. Site plan
      3. Plan views
      4. Elevation drawings
      5. Sectional drawings
      6. Detail drawings
      7. Auxiliary drawings
      8. Other
    16. Components
      1. Title block
      2. Design drawing area
      3. Legend
      4. Revision block
      5. Scale
    17. Measuring Tools
      1. Engineer’s scale
      2. Architect’s scale
      3. Metric scale
      4. Applications
    18. Line Types and Symbols
      1. Line types
        1. Property
        2. Boundary
        3. Main object
        4. Hidden
        5. Center
        6. Dimension and extension
        7. Break
        8. Reference
        9. Leader
        10. Other
      2. Symbols
        1. Building material
        2. Electrical
        3. Piping
        4. Door and window
    19. Abbreviations
      1. AGGR (aggregate)
      2. BM (bench mark)
      3. ELEV (elevation)
      4. MECH (mechanical)
      5. PWR (power)
      6. STR (structural)
      7. WDW (window)
      8. Other
    20. Grid Lines, Plan Locations, and Dimensions
      1. Grid lines
      2. Plan locations
      3. Dimensions
        1. Floor plans
        2. Elevations
        3. Sections and details
    21. Production Techniques
      1. Computer Aided Design (CAD)
      2. Care
      3. Procedures
    22. Blueprint Reading Parts and Locations
      1. Site plan
      2. Floor plan
      3. Elevation drawing
      4. Sectional drawing
      5. Detail drawing
      6. Electrical drawing
      7. HVAC plan
      8. Plumbing plan
      9. Door and window schedule


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019/20
  
  •  

    BCT 110 - OSHA 10 for the Construction Industry

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 10 concepts and applications. Includes worker rights and employer responsibilities, how to file a complaint, and how to identify, abate, avoid, and prevent job-related hazards. Also includes the four types of hazards commonly found on construction sites.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain worker rights under OSHA.
    2. Identify OSHA standards.
    3. Describe the four focus hazards for the construction industry.
    4. Identify general industry hazards.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to OSHA
      1. Why OSHA is important to workers
      2. Workers’ rights
        1. How to file a complaint
        2. Weekly fatality and catastrophe reports
        3. Material data safety sheet (MSDS)
        4. OSHA Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
      3. Employer responsibilities
    2. OSHA Standards
      1. Walking and working surfaces
      2. Exit Routes, emergency action plans, fire prevention plans, fire protection
      3. Electrical standards
      4. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
      5. Hazard communication
    3. Four Focus Hazards for Construction
      1. Falls
      2. Electrocution
      3. Struck-by hazards
      4. Caught-in or between hazards
    4. General Hazards
      1. Hazardous materials
      2. Materials handling
      3. Machine guarding
      4. Introduction to industrial hygiene
      5. Blood-borne pathogens
      6. Cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators, and conveyors
      7. Excavations
      8. Scaffolds
      9. Stairways and ladders
      10. Hand and power tools
      11. Ergonomics
      12. Safety and health programs


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2018
  
  •  

    BCT 111 - Basic Safety for the Building Trades

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Introduction to federal safety training standards. Includes employer responsibility-employee right to know, personal protective equipment, material handling, hand and power tools, electrical hazards, hazards communication standards, fire safety, scaffolds, fall protection, cranes, and stairways and ladders.

    Information: Successful completion of this course qualifies the student for the 10 hour safety training card.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the employer’s responsibility/employee right to know safety policies.
    2. Describe personal protective equipment needed for eye, hand, foot, head, skin, hearing, and fall protection.
    3. Describe material handling and hazardous material procedures.
    4. Describe safe and proper use of hand and power tools.
    5. Describe electrical hazard procedures such as lock-out/tag-out.
    6. Explain the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazards Communication Standard.
    7. Describe fire prevention in dealing with various specific flammable materials and fire safety guidelines.
    8. Describe the proper use of scaffolding.
    9. Describe fall protection training requirements, systems, and equipment.
    10. Describe operator hand signals, safety procedures and crane equipment failures.
    11. Describe the training requirements, ANSI guidelines, and the safe and proper use of stairways and ladders.

    Outline:
    1. Employer Responsibility-Employee Right to Know
      1. Unsafe conditions
      2. Regulations
      3. Hazards
      4. Exposure
      5. Accident prevention
    2. Personal Protective Equipment
      1. Eye protection
      2. Hand protection
      3. Foot protection
      4. Head protection
      5. Clothing
      6. Skin protection
      7. Breathing-respiratory
      8. Fall protection
      9. Hearing protection
    3. Material Handling
      1. Signaling
      2. Barricades
      3. Storage
      4. Housekeeping
      5. Rigging
      6. Hazardous materials
    4. Hand and Power Tools
      1. Hand tools
        1. Wrenches
        2. Saws
        3. Pliers
        4. Screw drivers
        5. Hammers
        6. Files
        7. Knives
      2. Power tools
        1. Electric power tools
        2. Pneumatic power tools
        3. Fuel powered tools
        4. Hydraulic power tools
        5. Powder-actuated tools
        6. Abrasive tools
        7. Woodworking tools
    5. Electrical Hazards
      1. Lock-out/tag-out
      2. Static and dynamic electricity
      3. Current and conducting
      4. Circuits
      5. Training
      6. Amperes
      7. Volts
      8. Resistance
      9. Electric shock
    6. Hazards Communication Standards (HAZCOM)
      1. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
      2. Worker responsibilities under HAZCOM
    7. Fire Safety
      1. Fire prevention guidelines
      2. How fires start
      3. Fire prevention
        1. Flammable and combustible liquids
        2. Flammable gasses
        3. Ordinary combustibles
        4. Other
      4. Fire fighting
        1. Classes of fires
        2. Other
    8. Scaffolds
      1. Erectors and dismantlers
      2. Capacity
      3. Scaffold platform construction
      4. Criteria for supported scaffolds
      5. Suspension scaffolds
      6. Access
      7. Fall protection (belts, lanyards, guard rails, toe boards)
      8. Cross bracing
      9. Midrails
    9. Fall Protection
      1. Training requirements
      2. Controlled access zones
      3. Safety monitoring systems
      4. Guidelines for fall arrest systems
      5. Guardrail/covers
      6. Connecting activity
      7. Positioning device systems
      8. Deceleration device
      9. Fall protection plan
      10. Protection from falling objects
      11. Safety net
    10. Cranes
      1. Operator error
      2. Site conditions
      3. Mechanical failure
      4. Structural failure
      5. Rigging failure
      6. Crane signal/radio communication failure
      7. Derricks
      8. Hand signals
      9. Wire rope
      10. Platform
      11. Transit
      12. Overhead hazards
    11. Stairways and ladders
      1. Risers
      2. Platform/landing
      3. Stair rails and handrails
      4. Midrails
      5. Ladder loads
      6. Rungs
      7. Cleats
      8. Spreaders
      9. Cages for fixed ladder
      10. Training requirements
      11. Ansi guidelines


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 112 - Construction Mathematics, Communication and Employability

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Introduction to basic mathematics concepts and employability in the construction industry. Includes whole numbers, measurements, fractions, decimals, conversion process, metric system, construction geometry, reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, employability in the construction business, critical thinking and computer skills, relationship skills, and workplace issues.

    Information: Mathematics assessment test is required before enrolling in this course.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Add, subtract, multiply and divide whole numbers, without a calculator.
    2. Use a standard ruler and a metric ruler to measure.
    3. Add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions.
    4. Add, subtract, multiply and divide decimals, with and without a calculator.
    5. Convert decimals to percentages and percentages to decimals, fractions to decimals, and decimals to fractions.
    6. Define the metric units of length, weight, volume, and temperature.
    7.  Apply basic geometry to measure the basic shapes used in the construction industry.
    8. Interpret information and instructions presented in both written and verbal form
    9. Describe how to communicate effectively in on-the-job situations using written and verbal skills.
    10. Explain entrepreneurship and entering the construction workforce.
    11. Solve problems in planning and scheduling for the construction industry.
    12. Explain computer systems and common uses of computers in the construction industry.
    13. Describe effective relationship skills with teammates and supervisors.
    14. Discuss workplace issues involving harassment, stress, and drugs and alcohol.

    Outline:
    1. Whole Numbers
      1. Parts of a whole number
      2. Adding whole numbers
      3. Subtracting whole numbers
      4. Multiplying simple whole numbers
      5. Dividing whole numbers
      6. Using the calculator to add, subtract. multiply, and divide whole numbers
    2. Measurements
      1. Using the standard ruler
      2. Architect’s scale
    3. Fractions
      1. Finding equivalent fractions
      2. Reducing fractions to their lowest term
      3. Comparing fractions and finding the lowest common denominator
      4. Adding fractions
      5. Subtracting fractions
      6. Multiplying fractions
      7. Dividing fractions
    4. Decimals
      1. Reading a machinist’s rule
      2. Comparing whole numbers with decimals
      3. Comparing decimals with decimals
      4. Adding and subtracting decimals
      5. Multiplying decimals
      6. Dividing with decimals
      7. Rounding with decimals
      8. Using the calculator to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals
    5. Conversion Process
      1. Converting decimals to percentages and percentages to decimals
      2. Converting fractions to decimals
      3. Converting decimals to fractions
      4. Converting inches to decimal equivalents in feet
    6. Metric System
      1. Units of weight, length, volume, and temperature
      2. Using the metric ruler
      3. Converting measurements
    7. Construction Geometry
      1. Angles
      2. Shapes
      3. Areas of shapes
      4. Volume of shapes
    8. Reading and Writing Skills
      1. Reading on the job
      2. Writing on the job
    9. Listening and Speaking Skills
      1. Active listening on the job
      2. Speaking on the job
    10. Employability in the Construction Business
      1. Entering the construction workforce
      2. Entrepreneurship
    11. Critical Thinking Skills
      1. Barriers to problem solving
      2. Solving problems using critical thinking skills
      3. Problems with planning and scheduling
    12. Computer Skills
      1. Computer terms
      2. Basic software packages
      3. Electronic mail (email)
      4. Computers in the construction industry
    13. Relationship Skills
      1. Self-presentation skills
      2. Conflict resolution
      3. Giving and receiving criticism
      4. Teamwork skills
      5. Leadership skills
    14. Workplace Issues
      1. Harassment
      2. Stress
      3. Drugs and alcohol abuse


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 113 - Hand and Power Tools

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Selection and safety procedures. Includes trades terms, hand tool, and power tool use to specific jobs in the construction industry.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. List and define trade terms related to hand and power tools.
    2. Describe basic safety procedures and the selection of appropriate safety equipment for use with specific hand tools.
    3. Describe basic safety procedures and maintenance procedures for specific power tools.
    4. Demonstrate the proper use of select tools and power tools.

    Outline:
    1. Trade Terms
      1. Hand tools
        1. Alloy
        2. Beveled
        3. Dropped-forged
        4. Kerf
        5. Plumb
        6. Other
      2. Power tools
        1. Ground fault protection
        2. Electric
        3. Hydraulic
        4. Pneumatic
        5. Powder (explosive)
        6. Revolutions per minute (RPM)
        7. Tempered
        8. Other
    2. Hand Tool Use
      1. Selection

    1.   Hammers

    a.   Claw

    b.   Ball peen

    2.   Screwdrivers

    a.   Slotted 

    b.   Phillips

    3.   Sledgehammers

    a.   Double face

    b.   Cross peen

    4.   Ripping bars and nail pullers

    5.   Wrenches

    a.   Adjustable

    b.   Nonadjustable

    6.   Pliers and wire cutters

    a.   Slip-joint

    b.   Long-nose

    c.   Lineman

    7.   Levels

    8.   Squares

    a.   Framing

    b.   Combination

    9.   Rulers and measuring tapes

    10. Vises and clamps

    a.   Bench vise

    b.   C-clamp

    11. Saws

    a.   Crosscut

    b.   Rip

    12. Files, chisels and punches

    13. Plumb bob

    14. Sockets and ratchets

    1. Safe use
    2. Maintenance
    1. Power Tool Use
      1. Selection

    1.   Drills

    a.   Electric

    b.   Cordless

    c.   Hammer

    d.   Electro-magnetic

    e.   Pneumatic

    2.   Saws

    a.   Circular

    b.   Saber

    c.   Reciprocating

    d.   Band

    e.   Jig

    3.   Grinders and sanders

    a.   Angle

    b.   End

    c.   Bench

    4.   Miscellaneous

    a.   Jackhammer

    b.   Porta-power

    c.   Powder actuated

    B.         Safe use

    C.        Maintenance


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2009

  
  •  

    BCT 114 - Blueprint Reading

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Basic concepts of blueprints. Including terms and symbols, components, measuring tools, line types and symbols, abbreviations, grid lines, plan locations, and dimensions, production techniques, and blueprint reading parts and locations.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify basic blueprint terms and symbols.
    2. List the components of a blueprint and explain specific scales.
    3. Identify types of measuring tools used to draw and/or measure lines on the blueprint and explain their applications.
    4. Describe basic line types and symbols used on construction drawings.
    5. Define standard abbreviations used in blueprint drawings.
    6. Describe the grid line systems used to identify plan locations and explain the purpose of dimensions used on drawings.
    7. Describe blueprint production techniques, care of blueprints and specific company procedures.
    8. Relate information on blueprints to specific parts and locations.

    Outline:
    1. Terms and Symbols
      1. Working drawings
      2. Site plan
      3. Plan views
      4. Elevation drawings
      5. Sectional drawings
      6. Detail drawings
      7. Auxiliary drawings
      8. Other
    2. Components
      1. Title block
      2. Design drawing area
      3. Legend
      4. Revision block
      5. Scale
    3. Measuring Tools
      1. Engineer’s scale
      2. Architect’s scale
      3. Metric scale
      4. Applications
    4. Line Types and Symbols
      1. Line types
        1. Property
        2. Boundary
        3. Main object
        4. Hidden
        5. Center
        6. Dimension and extension
        7. Break
        8. Reference
        9. Leader
        10. Other
      2. Symbols
        1. Building material
        2. Electrical
        3. Piping
        4. Door and window
    5. Abbreviations
      1. AGGR (aggregate)
      2. BM (bench mark)
      3. ELEV (elevation)
      4. MECH (mechanical)
      5. PWR (power)
      6. STR (structural)
      7. WDW (window)
      8. Other
    6. Grid Lines, Plan Locations, and Dimensions
      1. Grid lines
      2. Plan locations
      3. Dimensions
        1. Floor plans
        2. Elevations
        3. Sections and details
    7. Production Techniques
      1. Computer Aided Design (CAD)
      2. Care
      3. Procedures
    8. Blueprint Reading Parts and Locations
      1. Site plan
      2. Floor plan
      3. Elevation drawing
      4. Sectional drawing
      5. Detail drawing
      6. Electrical drawing
      7. HVAC plan
      8. Plumbing plan
      9. Door and window schedule


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 115 - Basic Rigging

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Rigging hardware and equipment. Includes safety, rigging equipment, inspection, crane hand signals, estimating an object, common rope knots, types of derricks and cranes, rigging and moving equipment use, and handling hazardous material.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain rigging safety rules and procedures.
    2. Identify the use of specific rigging equipment.
    3. Describe proper inspection procedures for rigging equipment.
    4. Demonstrate specific crane hand signals.
    5. Estimate size, weight and the center of gravity of specific objects.
    6. Identify and tie the common knots used for rigging operations.
    7. Identify and explain specific types of derricks.
    8. Identify and explain specific types of cranes.
    9. Describe safe procedures to rig and move materials and equipment.
    10. Discuss proper handling techniques for hazardous materials.

    Outline:
    1. Rigging Safety
      1. Rules
      2. Procedures
    2. Rigging Equipment
      1. Wire rope
      2. Eye splice
      3. Thimbles
      4. Shackles
      5. Sockets
      6. Wedge sockets
      7. Wire rope clips
      8. Wire rope slings
      9. Bridle slings
      10. Choker hitch slings
      11. Basket hitch slings
      12. Synthetic web slings
      13. Choker slings
      14. Basket slings
      15. Fiber ropes
    3. Inspection
      1. Wire ropes
      2. Synthetic web slings
      3. Hooks, shackles and sockets
      4. Equipment to be rigged
    1. Crane Hand Signals
      1. Crawler and telescoping boom cranes
        1. Raise load
        2. Raise load slowly
        3. Lower load
        4. Lower load slowly
        5. Raise boom
        6. Raise boom slowly
        7. Lower boom
        8. Lower boom slowly
        9. Raise boom, lower load
        10. Lower boom, raise load
        11. Raise boom, hold load
        12. Swing boom
        13. Stop
        14. Other
      2. Tower and Gantry Cranes
        1. Travel bridge
        2. Travel trolley
        3. Stop
        4. Emergency stop
        5. Select trolley
    2. Estimating an Object
      1. Size
      2. Weight
      3. Center of gravity
    3. Common Rope Knots
      1. Bowline
      2. Running bowline
      3. Timber hitch
      4. Half hitch
      5. Square
      6. Clove hitch
      7. Barrel hitch
    4. Types of Derricks
      1. A-Frame
      2. Gin Pole
      3. Guyed
      4. Stiff leg
      5. Chicago boom
    5. Types of Cranes
      1. Crawler
      2. Truck mounted
      3. Truck mounted hydraulic
      4. Gantry mounted
      5. Tower mounted
      6. Hammerhead
      7. Cherry picker
      8. Drott
    6. Rigging and Moving Equipment Use
      1. Safety rules
      2. Procedures
    7. Material Handling
      1. Hazards
      2. Safe Techniques and procedures
      3. Equipment


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 120 - Blueprint Reading for Construction

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Residential and light commercial blueprint reading. Includes blueprint symbols and terminology, construction materials, applications and specifications for commercial buildings, light frame and brick veneer construction, and appropriate mathematics.

    Recommendation: Completion of BCT 107  before enrolling in this course. If any recommended course is taken, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate.
    Information: BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Read architect’s and engineer’s scales.
    2. Interpret the architect’s terminology associated with advanced residential and light commercial applications, to include symbols, materials, scaling practices and abbreviations.
    3. Explain and apply specifications for electrical, HVAC, plumbing and masonry work.
    4. Explain and use basic trade blueprints applicable to electrical, HVAC, plumbing and masonry work.
    5. Work mathematical problems associated with quantities of materials for concrete slabs, foundations and general utilities.

    Outline:
    1. Architectural Terminology
      1. Dimensioning standards
      2. Abbreviations
      3. Construction materials
    2. Specifications
      1. Residential
      2. Light commercial
    3. Blueprints
      1. Commercial buildings
      2. Stores
      3. Apartments
      4. Light frame construction
    4. Site Plans
      1. Development
      2. Layout
      3. Utility layout


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017
  
  •  

    BCT 123 - Concrete/Masonry

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 4 lab periods

    Basic concepts and materials for concrete construction, finishing, and masonry work. Includes trade terminology, composition and characteristics of concrete, uses of concrete as a building material, effects of craftsmanship on finished concrete, concrete construction process, site operations and work set-up, history of masonry, and modern masonry materials and methods.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Define terms associated with concrete construction.
    2. Determine the composition and characteristics of concrete.
    3. Differentiate the uses of concrete as a building material.
    4. Identify the effects of craftsmanship on finished concrete.
    5. Explain the concrete construction process.
    6. Establish on site operations and work requirements.
    7. Review the history of masonry.
    8. Describe modern masonry materials and methods.

    Outline:
    1. Trade Terminology
      1. Admixtures
      2. Tools
      3. Cement
      4. Hydration
      5. Aggregates
      6. Plasticizing
      7. Working the concrete terms
      8. Pre-stressed
      9. Post-tensioned and pre-tensioned
    2. Composition and Characteristics of Concrete
      1. Cement, water, aggregates, admixtures
      2. Availability of raw materials
      3. Versatility
      4. Strength
      5. Hardening in the presence of water
      6. Durability
    3. Uses of Concrete as a Building Material
      1. Slabs on grade
      2. Elevated structural elements
      3. Pipes and culverts
      4. Examples of use of concrete:  locks, dams, bridges, docks, tunnels, traffic barriers, curbs, gutters, retaining walls, light poles, railroad cross ties, storm drains, roads, sidewalks, counter tops, and airport runways
    4. Effects of Craftsmanship on Finished Concrete
      1. Placing
      2. Consolidation
      3. Forms
      4. Screeding
      5. Bull floating
      6. Edging
      7. Jointing
      8. Troweling
      9. Brooming
    5. Concrete Construction Process
      1. Finishing
      2. Tamping
      3. Sealing
      4. Form removal
      5. Mixing
      6. Placing
      7. Curring
      8. Manpower requirements
      9. Installing reinforcement
      10. How to transport material
      11. How to use tools for each phase of placement and finishing
      12. Safety precautions
    6. Site Operations and Work Set-Up
      1. Dependability
      2. Responsibility
      3. Team player
      4. Recognize an unsafe situation
      5. Quality work
      6. Skills
      7. Initiative
    7. History of Masonry
      1. From prehistory to the industrial revolution
      2. Clay bricks
      3. Hand formed-sun dried bricks
      4. Kiln-fired
      5. Famous arches
      6. Rise of masons
      7. After the industrial revolution
    8. Modern Masonry Materials and Methods
      1. Clay products developed and improved
      2. Brick making process improved
      3. Hollow masonry units
      4. Architectural terra cotta
      5. Concrete products
      6. Developed block with air cells
      7. Blocks made with cinder
      8. Admixtures, color dyes
      9. Rafstra-altra lights
      10. Blocks made from recycled materials


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 130 - EPA Clean Air Act: Section 608

    1 Credits, 1 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 0 lab periods

    Freon certification preparation. Includes basics of refrigerant bearing equipment, ozone depletion and the new legislation, technician categories covered on the certification examination, and certification testing.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the basis of refrigerant bearing equipment.
    2. State details of ozone depletion, legislation and the rules for implementation.
    3. Describe specific technical details for the three technician categories.
    4. Identify correct answers on sample test questions and myths and realities about the EPA exam.

    Outline:
    1. Basics of Refrigerant Bearing Equipment
      1. Cooling circuit measurements
      2. Cooling circuit operation
      3. Compressor lubricants
      4. Leak detection
      5. Charging
      6. Refrigerant families and new refrigerants
    2. Ozone Depletion and New Legislation
      1. Rules for implementation
      2. Recovery, recycling, and reclaiming vapor and liquid
    3. Technician Categories Covered on Certification Examination
      1. Small appliances
      2. High pressure appliances
      3. Low pressure appliances
    4. Certification Testing
      1. Sample questions
      2. Myths and realities
      3. A new professionalism
      4. Focused study questions


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 132 - Residential and Industrial HVAC I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Introduction to materials and procedures for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC). Includes trade mathematics, copper and plastic piping practices, soldering and brazing, ferrous metal piping practices, basic electricity, introduction to cooling and heating, and air distribution systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107 .
    Information: BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115   substitute for BCT 105 . BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
      button image Prior Learning and link to PLA webpage

    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe what the Clean Air Act means to the HVAC trade and the technician.
    2. Identify and calculate various math values, equations, and figures used in the construction trades.
    3. Describe the installation procedures and requirements for pressure testing the system after installation.
    4. Describe the procedures for soldering and brazing copper tubing and fittings.                                 
    5. Describe the tools, installation and joining procedures for steel and grooved pipe runs.
    6. Make voltage, current, and resistance measurements using electrical test equipment.
    7. Describe the fundamentals, mechanical refrigeration system components, and control devices used in cooling systems and explain how each works.
    8. Identify the major components of gas and oil furnaces, and electric heating and describe how each works.
    9. Demonstrate the use and installation of insulation and vapor barriers used in duct systems.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to HVAC
      1. Heating
      2. Ventilation
      3. Air conditioning
      4. Blueprints, codes, and specifications
      5. Careers in HVAC
      6. Types of training programs
      7. HVAC technician and the environment
    2. Trade Mathematics
      1. Metric system
      2. Scientific notation
      3. Powers and roots
      4. Introduction to Algebra
      5. Introduction to Geometry
      6. Working with right triangles
      7. Converting decimal feet to feet and inches and visa versa
    3. Copper and Plastic Piping Practices
      1. Installation precautions
      2. Materials
      3. Copper tubing
      4. Plastic pipe
      5. Hangers and supports
      6. Insulating
      7. Pressure testing
      8. Piping codes
      9. Safety
    4. Soldering and Brazing
      1. Soldering
      2. Brazing copper fittings and tubing
    5. Ferrous Metal Piping Practices
      1. Steel pipe
      2. Tools, materials, and installation
      3. Joining procedures
      4. Grooved pipe
    6. Basic Electricity
      1. Electricity 
      2. AC and DC voltage
      3. Electrical circuit characteristics
      4. Electrical circuits
      5. Magnetism
      6. Electrical components
      7. Electrical safety
      8. Circuit diagrams
      9. Electronic controls
      10. Electric measuring instruments
    7. Introduction to Cooling
      1. Fundamentals
      2. Mechanical refrigeration system
      3. Refrigerants
      4. Compressors
      5. Condensers
      6. Evaporators
      7. Expansion (metering) devices
      8. Other components
      9. Controls
      10. Piping
    8. Introduction to Heating
      1. Heating fundamentals
      2. Forced – air furnaces
      3. Gas furnaces
      4. Oil furnaces
      5. Electric heating
    9. Air Distribution Systems
      1. Fans and blowers
      2. Air distribution duct systems
      3. Duct system components
      4. Temperature and humidity measurement instruments
      5. Air distribution system measurement instruments
      6. Air velocity measurement instruments


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 133 - Residential and Industrial HVAC II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 132 . Introduction to commercial airside systems. Includes chimneys, vents, flues, hydronic systems, air quality equipment, leak detection, evacuation, recovery, charging, alternating current, and basic electronics.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 132  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the typical range of capacities for a commercial airside system.
    2. Perform the adjustments necessary to achieve proper combustion in a gas furnace including components, venting, and controls.
    3. Select, calibrate, and properly use the tools and instruments needed to balance hydronic systems.
    4. Discuss accessories used such as energy conservation equipment, fire and smoke dampers, air purification systems, and the use of a manometer or differential pressure gauge to measure the friction loss of an air filter.
    5. Identify the service equipment used for leak detection, evacuation, and charging refrigerant into a system, and explain the use of each.  
    6. Use a volt/ohm meter, megger, capacitor analyzer, and chart recorder to test capacitors, transformers, and motors.
    7. Describe the operation, use, and testing of electronic components used in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.

    Outline:
    1. Commercial Airside Systems
      1. Zoning
      2. Typical all air systems
      3. Outdoor air and air systems
      4. Types of all air systems
      5. Duct systems
      6. Air terminals
      7. Air source equipment
      8. Air handlers
    2. Chimneys, Vents, and Flues
      1. Combustion
      2. Flue gases
      3. Furnace venting
      4. Vent system components
      5. Natural draft furnaces
      6. Induced draft gas furnaces
      7. Condensing gas furnaces
      8. Draft controls
    3. Introduction to Hydronic Systems
      1. Water system terms
      2. Hot water heating systems
      3. Hot water heating system components
      4. Steam systems
      5. Valves
      6. Heat exchangers and converters
      7. Terminals
      8. Steam system piping
      9. Condensate return and feedwater system components
      10. Flash tanks
      11. Boiler blowdown and skimming
      12. Boiler water treatment
      13. Chilled water cooling systems
      14. Chilled water system components
      15. Dual temperature water systems
      16. Water piping systems
      17. Water balance
      18. Water system balancing
    4. Air Quality Equipment
      1. Process and comfort air conditioning
      2. Humidity control
      3. Introduction to indoor air quality
      4. Air conditioning energy conservation equipment
      5. Fire and smoke dampers
      6. Ultraviolet light air purification systems
      7. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide monitors
    5. Leak Detection, Evacuation, Recovery and Charging
      1. Leak detection
      2. Refrigerant containment
      3. Evacuation
      4. Charging
      5. Using Zeotrope refrigerants
    6. Alternating Current
      1. Transformers
      2. Power generation
      3. Using alternating current (AC) power
      4. Induction motors
      5. Testing AC components
      6. Safety
      7. AC voltage on circuit diagrams
    7. Basic Electronics
      1. Theory of electronics
      2. Electronic components, circuits, and testing
      3. Printed circuit boards
      4. Introduction to computers


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 134 - Residential and Industrial HVAC III

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 133 . Introduction to the principles of heat transfer, humidity, filtering, and energy saving devices used in HVAC systems. Includes accessories and optional equipment, metering devices, compressors, heat pumps, leak detection, evacuation, recovery, and charging.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 133  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss accessories used such as energy conservation equipment, fire and smoke dampers, air purification systems, and the use of a manometer or differential pressure gauge to measure the friction loss of an air filter.
    2. Isolate and correct malfunctions in gas heating systems.
    3. Successfully troubleshoot selected problems in cooling equipment.
    4. Discuss heat pump classifications, operations, components, performance, installation, service, and analyze a heat pump control circuit.
    5. Identify steps in the handling of typical service call that will contribute to good customer relations.
    6. Demonstrate how to form, connect, and secure sheet metal duct.
    7. Demonstrate how to connect and secure flexible duct to rigid sheet metal duct.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Control Circuit Troubleshooting
      1. Thermostats
      2. HVAC control systems
      3. Control circuit sequence of operation
      4. Using an organized approach to electrical troubleshooting
      5. Safety
      6. HVAC system troubleshooting
      7. HVAC equipment input power, load and control circuits
      8. Electrical troubleshooting common to all HVAC equipment
      9. Motor and motor circuit troubleshooting
      10. Hydronic controls
      11. Pneumatic controls
      12. HVAC digital control systems
    2. Troubleshooting Gas Heating
      1. Control circuits
      2. Combustion systems
      3. Air system
    3. Troubleshooting Cooling
      1. Operation of the mechanical refrigeration (cooling) system
      2. Electrical control of mechanical cooling system operation
      3. Troubleshooting approach
      4. Electrical troubleshooting
      5. Mechanical refrigeration cycle troubleshooting
      6. Low charge or overcharge of refrigerant
      7. Evaporator and condenser airflow problems
      8. Compressor problems and causes
      9. Metering device troubleshooting
      10. Troubleshooting refrigerant lines and accessories
      11. Non-condensibles and contamination in a system
      12. Condensate water disposal problems
    4. Heat Pumps
      1. Heat pump classifications
      2. Heat pump operation
      3. Heat pump components
      4. Heat pump performance
      5. Balance point and supplementary heat
      6. Installation
      7. Service
      8. Heat pump controls
    5. Basic Installation and Maintenance Practices
      1. Mechanical fasteners
      2. Gaskets
      3. Packing
      4. Seals
      5. Bearings
      6. Lubrication
      7. Belts and belt drives
      8. Coupling and direct drives
      9. Basic maintenance procedures
      10. Documentation
      11. Customer relation
      12. Customer communication
    6. Sheet Metal Duct Systems
      1. Steel and other metals
      2. Seams (locks)
      3. Connectors
      4. Hangers and supports
      5. Installing registers, grilles, and diffusers
      6. Insulation
      7. Dampers and access doors
      8. Takeoffs
      9. Zoning accessories and coils
    7. Fiberglass and Flexible Duct Systems
      1. Types and standards
      2. Advantages of modular duct construction
      3. Extended plenum supply system
      4. Closure systems
      5. Fabricating and joining a duct module
      6. Connecting ductboard to sheet metal
      7. Flexible round duct connections
      8. Hanging and supporting
      9. Repairing damage


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 135 - National Electrical Code Residential Wiring Applications

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Electrical wiring and installation conforming to National Electrical Code requirements. Includes grounded systems, requirements for over-current protection of conductors, ampacity criteria, installing over-current protection of conductors, installing services, installing motors and transformers, remote control and signaling circuits, and installing structured wiring in homes and offices.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 172  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe grounded systems.
    2. Describe the requirements for overcurrent protection of conductors.
    3. Describe ampacity criteria.
    4. Perform the installation of overcurrent protection for conductors.
    5. Perform service installations.
    6. Perform motor and transformer installations.
    7. Perform remote control and signaling circuit installations.
    8. Describe the installation procedures for structured wiring in homes and offices.

    Outline:
    1. Grounded Systems
      1. Circuit and system grounding
      2. Grounding electrode systems
      3. Bonding service equipment
      4. Equipment Grounding
    2. Requirements for Overcurrent Protection of Conductors
      1. Short
      2. Ground fault
      3. Overload
    3. Ampacity criteria
      1. Cross sectional area
      2. Type of insulation
      3. Ambient temperature
    4. Installing Overcurrent Protection of Conductors
      1. Overcurrent devices
      2. Conductor ampacities and temperature ratings
      3. Protection of conductors
      4. Location of overcurrent devices
    5. Installing Devices
      1. Number of services and disconnects
      2. Services conductors
      3. Service entrance conductors
      4. Service equipment
    6. Installing Motors and Transformers
      1. Motor controllers and motor circuits
      2. Protection of motor circuits
      3. Installation requirements for transformers
    7. Remote Control and Signaling Circuits
      1. Terms and definitions
      2. Class one circuits
      3. Class two and class three circuits
      4. Installing class two and three, and programmable logic controller cables
    8. Installing Structured Wiring in Homes and Offices
      1. Wiring Installation
        1. Home television
        2. Telephone
        3. Low voltage signal systems
      2. Detectors, fire alarms, and security systems
        1. Types
        2. Installation


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 145 - Carpentry I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Theories and concepts for carpentry. Includes orientation to the trade, wood building materials, fasteners and adhesive, hand and power tools, floor systems, wall, ceiling, and roof framing, and windows and exterior doors.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115  substitute for BCT 105 , BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the history of the carpentry trade and the importance of safety in the construction industry.
    2. Explain the terms commonly used in discussing wood and lumber and the different types of fasteners and adhesives.
    3. Demonstrate the proper use of hand, portable power, and stationary power tools.
    4. Demonstrate how to layout and construct different types of framing systems and floor assemblies.
    5. Demonstrate how to construct wall and ceiling framing.
    6. Describe the terms associated and the various types of materials used with roof framing.
    7. Explain the procedures for installing the various types of fixed, sliding, and swinging windows and exterior doors.

    Outline:
    1. Orientation to the Trade
      1. History of the carpentry trade
      2. Modern carpentry
      3. Opportunities in the construction industry
      4. Human relations
      5. Safety in the construction industry
    2. Wood Building Materials, Fasteners, and Adhesives
      1. Lumber sources and uses
      2. Lumber defects and grading
      3. Plywood and building boards
      4. Engineered wood
      5. Nails, screws, anchors, and adhesives
    3. Hand and Power Tools
      1. Types of hand and portable power tools
      2. Types of stationary power tools
    4. Floor Systems
      1. Methods of framing houses
      2. Working drawings and specifications
      3. The floor system
      4. Laying out and constructing a floor assembly
      5. Installing joists and girders
    5. Wall and Ceiling Framing
      1. Components of a wall
      2. Laying out a wall
      3. Assembly and installation of a wall
      4. Ceiling lay out and framing
    6. Roof Framing
      1. Types of roofs
      2. Basic roof layout
      3. Laying out hips and valleys
      4. Rafter layout
      5. Truss construction
    7. Windows and Exterior Doors
      1. Types of windows
      2. Window construction
      3. Window installation
      4. Types of exterior doors
      5. Door sizes, thresholds, and weatherstripping


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 146 - Woodworking I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Concepts and procedures for working with hardwoods. Includes introduction to hardwoods, measuring hardwoods, use of hardwoods, pressure treated wood, hardwood preparation, ripping wood, miter cuts, cross cuts, job site safety, gluing and clamping, veneers, curves and circles, dados and rabbets, and smoothing wood.

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    Course Learning Outcomes

    1.      Discuss differences between hardwood and softwoods and their uses.

    2.      Demonstrate how to measure and prepare hardwoods.

    3.      Describe outdoor uses, applications, and safety procedures working with pressure-treated wood.

    4.      Demonstrate rip, miter and cross-cutting methods.

    5.      Discuss safety on the job.

    6.      Demonstrate gluing and clamping.

    7.      Demonstrate how to use veneers.

    8.      Demonstrate how to make dado and rabbits.

    9.      Demonstrate how to smooth wood.


    Outline:

    I.        Introduction to Hardwoods

    A.     Hardwoods and softwoods

    B.     Growth patterns

    C.     Kinds of wood defects

    II.       Measuring Hardwoods

    A.     Board feet

    B.     Standard length/thickness

    C.     Effects of moisture

    III.      Uses of Hardwoods

    A.     Logging hardwoods

    B.     Methods of cutting

    IV.     Pressure Treated Wood

    A.     Outdoor Uses

    B.     Applications

    C.     Safety precautions

    V.      Hardwood Preparation

    A.     Cutting

    B.     Machining

    C.     Finishing

    VI.     Ripping Wood

    A.     Using a rip blade

    B.     Using guides to cut straight lines

    C.     Using different saws

    VII.    Miter Cuts

    A.     Types of cuts

    B.     Types of blades

    C.     Types of angles

    VIII.   Cross Cuts

    A.     Determining grain of wood

    B.     Types of blades

    C.     Marking and scoring

    IX.     Job Site Safety

    A.     Working with wood

    B.     Proper protection

    C.     Proper procedures

    X.      Gluing and Clamping

    A.     Procedures

    B.     Expansion and contraction of wood

    C.     Moisture content

    XI.     Veneers

    A.     Identification

    B.     Uses

    C.     Cutting procedures

    XII.    Curves and Circles

    A.     Cutting procedures

    B.     Size

    C.     Saws

    D.     Relief cuts

    XIII.   Dados and Rabbets

    A.     Cutting procedures

    B.     Special blades

    C.     Router and shaper

    XIV.   Smoothing Wood

    A.     Fine saw blades

    B.     Hand planes

    C.     Sanders


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2019-2020
  
  •  

    BCT 147 - Woodworking II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    A continuation of BCT 146 . Advanced topics in woodworking. Includes safety practices; designing and planning; measuring and cutting; planing, chiseling, and sanding; butt, biscuit and dowel joints; rabbet joints; dado joints; lap joints; miter joints; mortise-and-tenon joint; veneers; using fasteners, dovetail joints and case casework; and applying stains and clear finishes.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 146  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: Prerequisite(s) may be waived with consent of instructor.
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    Course Learning Outcomes

    1.      Describe proper safety practices for the woodshop.

    2.      Discuss design and planning procedures for building furniture.

    3.      Use measuring and cutting techniques.

    4.      Demonstrate planing, chiseling, and sanding.

    5.      Demonstrate butt, biscuit, and dowel joints.

    6.      Construct rabbet joints, dado, mortise and tenon, and dovetail joints.

    7.      Demonstrate how to use veneers.

    8.      Demonstrate how to use the right fastener for the job at hand.

    9.      Apply stains and wood finishes.


    Outline:

    I.        Safety Practices

    A.     Common woodshop hazards

    B.     Personal protective equipment

    C.     Setting up a safe workshop

    II.       Designing and Planning

    A.     Design concepts in cabinetry

    B.     Drawings

    C.     Designing, planning, and building a project

    III.      Measuring and Cutting

    A.     Measuring and marking tools

    B.     Marking stock for cutting

    IV.      Planning, Chiseling, and Sanding

    A.     Hand and power planning

    B.     Proper chiseling technique

    C.     Tools and procedures for effective sanding

    V.      Butt, Biscuit, and Dowel Joints

    A.     Butt joints

    B.     Biscuit joints and jointers

    C.     Types of dowels for joinery

    VI.      Rabbet Joints

    A.     Laying out a rabbet joint

    B.     Methods of cutting the rabbet

    C.     Assembling the joint

    VII.     Dado Joints

    A.     Laying out a dado joint

    B.     Methods of cutting the dado

    C.     Assembling the joint

    VIII.    Lap Joints

    A.     Cross-lap joint

    B.     Half-lap joint

    C.     Full-lap joint

    IX.      Miter Joints

    A.     Importance of accuracy

    B.     Making a picture frame

    X.      Mortise-and–Tenon Joint

    A.     Designing the joint

    B.     Forming the parts

    C.     Assembling the joint

    XI.      Veneers

    A.     Identification

    B.     Uses

    C.     Cutting procedures

    XII.     Fasteners

    A.     Screws for woodworking

    B.     Predrilling holes

    C.     Countersinking for flathead screws

    D.     Plugging screw holes

    XIII.    Dovetail Joints and Casework

    A.     Dovetail joints

    B.     Casework

    C.     Building furniture

    XIV.   Stains and Clear Finishes

    A.     Surface preparation

    B.     Choosing and applying a stain

    C.     Choosing and applying a clear finish


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 148 - Cabinetmaking I

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Concepts and procedures for fine woodworking practices. Includes introduction to cabinetmaking, cabinetry styles, human factors, working drawings, lumber and millwork, manufactured panel products, veneers and plastic overlays, hardware, health and safety, measuring and laying out materials, stationary power machines, hand and portable power tools, surfacing and shaping, and building a basic cabinet.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 146  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the design and material decisions necessary to produce cabinetry.
    2. Describe the differences between traditional, provincial, and contemporary designs.
    3. Apply design elements and principles to create functional and attractive cabinets.
    4. List the parts of a working drawing.
    5. Describe the process of harvesting, drying, and ordering lumber.
    6. Explain the use of various panel products for cabinets and fine furniture.
    7. Match veneer sheets into pleasing patterns for inlaying or overlaying.
    8. Explain various methods of installing door and drawer hardware.
    9. Explain how to reduce or eliminate hazardous and unsafe conditions around machines and equipment.
    10. Demonstrate proper use of marking, measuring, and layout tools.
    11. Demonstrate proper operation of stationary power saws.
    12. Demonstrate proper use of hand and portable power tools.
    13. Demonstrate surfacing and shaping with the jointer, planer, and shaper.
    14. Produce a basic face frame style cabinet.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to Cabinetmaking
      1. Design decisions
      2. Material decisions
      3. Producing cabinetry
    2. Cabinetry Styles
      1. Traditional styles
      2. Provincial styles
      3. Contemporary styles
    3. Human Factors
      1. Standing dimensions
      2. Sitting dimensions
    4. Working Drawings
      1. Types of drawings
      2. Reading shop drawings
      3. Reading specifications
    5. Lumber and Millwork
      1. Harvesting
      2. Drying
      3. Ordering lumber
    6. Manufactured Panel Products
      1. Structural wood panels
      2. Appearance panels
      3. Working with panel products
    7. Veneers and Plastic Overlays
      1. Matching veneers
      2. Veneer inlays
      3. Plastic overlays
    8. Hardware
      1. Pulls and knobs
      2. Door hardware
      3. Drawer hardware
    9. Health and Safety
      1. Unsafe acts
      2. Hazardous conditions
      3. Personal protective equipment
    10. Measuring and Laying Out Materials
      1. Marking tools
      2. Measuring tools
      3. Layout practices
    11. Stationary Power Machines
      1. Table saw and radial arm saw
      2. Band saw and router
      3. Jig saw
    12. Hand and Portable Power Tools
      1. Handsaws
      2. Sawing by hand
      3. Portable power saws
      4. Maintaining hand and portable power saws
    13. Surfacing and Shaping
      1. Reading wood grain
      2. Jointing
      3. Planing
      4. Shaping
    14. Building a Basic Cabinet
      1. Planning and designing
      2. Material selection
      3. Producing a cabinet
      4. Finishing a cabinet


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 149 - Cabinetmaking II

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 148 . Includes turning, joint making, abrasives and sanding machines, gluing and clamping, bending and laminating wood, overlaying and inlaying veneer, installing plastic laminates, advanced case construction, doors, drawers, applying finishing materials, kitchen cabinets, industrial production cabinetmaking, and employment in cabinetmaking.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 148  
    Information: Prerequisite may be waived with appropriate carpentry/cabinetmaking skills. See an instructor or department chair for information.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Perform steps to turn cylinders, beads, coves, and grooves.
    2. Select appropriate joints based on the product and material.
    3. Operate various hand and portable and stationary power sanding equipment.
    4. Explain the proper procedure for assembling a product using adhesives and clamps.
    5. Describe the procedures for wet bending and laminating wood.
    6. Demonstrate inlaying bandings to create borders and geometric shapes.
    7. Describe steps taken to prepare a surface for plastic laminate.
    8. Identify the types of case construction.
    9. List the steps for making a hinged and a sliding door.
    10. Describe design and engineering factors that influence drawer construction.
    11. Demonstrate applying finish using brushing, spraying, and wiping techniques.
    12. Explain how to layout and install kitchen cabinets and countertops.
    13. Discuss custom and batch production in cabinetmaking.
    14. Describe the roll of an entrepreneur and the careers found in cabinetmaking.

    Outline:
    1. Turning
      1. Lathes
      2. Turning tools
      3. Between center and faceplate turnings
    2. Joint Making
      1. Mortise and tenon
      2. Pocket and plate joinery
      3. Dovetails, box joints, and finger joints
    3. Abrasives and Sanding Machines
      1. Hand and portable sanding
      2. Stationary power sanding machines
    4. Gluing and Clamping
      1. Selecting adhesives
      2. Types of clamps
      3. Clamping procedure
    5. Bending and Laminating Wood
      1. Wood bending
      2. Wood laminating
    6. Overlaying and Inlaying Veneer
      1. Materials, tools, and supplies
      2. Overlaying and inlaying
      3. Special practices for finishing veneered surfaces
    7. Installing Plastic Laminates
      1. Installing laminates on flat surfaces
      2. Forming curves
      3. Postforming
    8. Advanced Case Construction
      1. Types of case construction
      2. Case materials and components
      3. Introduction to 32 millimeter construction
    9. Doors
      1. Hinged doors
      2. Sliding doors
      3. Tambour door
    10. Drawers
      1. Design factors
      2. Components and assemblies
      3. Installing and adjusting drawers
    11. Applying Finishing Materials
      1. Brushing
      2. Spraying
      3. Wiping
    12. Kitchen Cabinets
      1. Planning and layout
      2. Installing modular kitchen cabinets
      3. Installing countertops
      4. Producing cabinets
    13. Industrial Production Cabinetmaking
      1. Custom production
      2. Batch production
    14. Employment in Cabinetmaking
      1. Levels of employment
      2. Finding employment
      3. Careers
      4. Self-employment


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 150 - Plumbing Basics

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Theories and concepts for plumbing and pipe fitting. Includes physics for plumbers, plumbing materials, water supplies, drainage, sewage disposal, pipe joint connections, pipe fittings, rough-in, valves and faucets, and fixtures.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 111  



    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the physical concepts and functions used in plumbing and pipe fitting.
    2. Identify plumbing materials and demonstrate their use for the appropriate job.
    3. Discuss the various sources of water purveyors.
    4. Calculate and install required drain lines.
    5. Describe sewer distribution and sewage disposal.
    6. Describe connections used on different types of pipe.
    7. Describe fittings used on different types of pipe.
    8. Demonstrate roughing-in of plumbing to blueprint specifications.
    9. Demonstrate installation and maintenance of valves, faucets, and cocks.
    10. Install fixtures with supply and waste connections and determine rough-in measurements.

    Outline:
    1. Physics for Plumbers and Pipe Fitters
      1. Measurements
      2. Mass and weight
      3. Heat and work
      4. Power
      5. Pressure
      6. Thermometers
      7. Steam
      8. Mechanical powers
      9. Pulley
      10. Hydraulics
      11. Flow of water in pipes
      12. Elementary pumps
    2. Plumbing Materials
      1. Cast iron pipe
      2. Malleable iron pipe
      3. Wrought iron pipe

     

    1. Steel pipe
    2. Copper pipe
    3. Brass pipe
    4. Lead
    5. Tin
    6. Antimony
    7. Babbit
    8. Red/White lead
    9. Plumber’s soil
    10. Plastic pipe
    1. Water Supplies
      1. Natural water sources
      2. City water sources
      3. Power pumps
    2. Drainage
      1. House sewers
      2. Traps
    3. Sewage Disposal
      1. Disposal system elements
      2. Septic tanks
      3. Grease traps
      4. Sewer distribution
      5. Siphon action
      6. Tank size calculations
      7. Septic tank maintenance
      8. Causes and removal of sewer obstructions
    4. Pipe Joint Connections
      1. Bell-and spigot joints
      2. Cutting soil pipe
      3. Wrought pipe
      4. Coated cast iron pipe
      5. Corrosive waste pipe
    5. Pipe Fittings
      1. Cast iron fittings
      2. Malleable iron fittings
      3. Brass fittings
      4. Steel fittings
      5. Drainage fittings
    6. Roughing-In
      1. Measurements
      2. Roughing-in layout
      3. Special fittings used in roughing-in
      4. Testing
    7. Valves and Faucets
      1. Valves
      2. Faucets
      3. Cocks
    8. Fixtures
      1. Lavatories
      2. Supply connections
      3. Waste connections
      4. Roughing-in measurements


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2011

  
  •  

    BCT 153 - Finishing Techniques in Cabinet and Furniture Making

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Wood finishing techniques for cabinet and furniture making. Includes safe and effective use of a variety of wood finishes and finishing equipment, reasons for finishing wood, tools for applying finishes, oil finishes, wood stains, pore fillers, introduction to film finishes, shellac, lacquer, varnish, water-based finishes, conversion finishes, choosing a finish, “finishing” the finish, caring for wood finishes, repairing finishes, finishing different woods, and strippers.

    Recommendation: Woodworking and cabinetmaking experience helpful. See a BCT faculty member for assistance.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the safe and effective use of finishes and finishing equipment.
    2. Discuss the reasons for using wood finishes.
    3. Use methods of preparing the wood surface for finishing.
    4. Use finishing tools and equipment.
    5. Demonstrate the proper application of oil finishes.
    6. Demonstrate the proper application of wood stains.
    7. Demonstrate the proper application of wood pore fillers.
    8. Describe the application of film finishes.
    9. Demonstrate the proper application of shellac.
    10. Demonstrate the proper application of lacquer.
    11. Demonstrate the proper application of varnish.
    12. Discuss the pros and cons of water-based finishes.
    13. Demonstrate the proper application of conversion finishes.
    14. Describe methods for choosing the appropriate finish for the job.
    15. Demonstrate how to “finish” a finish.
    16. Discuss methods for caring for different wood finishes.
    17. Describe techniques for repairing damaged finishes.
    18. Discuss choosing the right finish for a variety of different woods.
    19. Describe the proper use of strippers in wood refinishing.

    Outline:
    1. Safety and Use of Wood Finishing
      1. Importance of cross ventilation
      2. Personal protective equipment and respirators
      3. Variety of wood finishes
      4. Finishing equipment
    2. Reasons for Finishing Wood
      1. Sanitation
      2. Stabilization
      3. Decoration
    3. Preparing the Wood Surface for Finishing
      1. Sanding and smoothing
      2. Dents, gouges, and holes
      3. Wood putties
    4. Tools for Applying Finishes
      1. Rags and brushes
      2. Spray guns and equipment
      3. Common spraying problems
    5. Oil Finishes
      1. Types of oil finishes
      2. Choosing an oil finish
      3. Applying oil finishes
    6. Wood Stains
      1. Understanding stains
      2. How woods react to stains
      3. Applying stain
    7. Pore Fillers
      1. Using finish to fill the pores
      2. Using paste-wood filler to fill the pores
    8. Introduction to Film Finishes
      1. Sealers and sanding sealers
      2. Understanding how finishes cure
      3. Solvents and thinners
    9. Shellac
      1. How shellac performs
      2. Categories of shellac
      3. Applying shellac
    10. Lacquer
      1. Characteristics of lacquer
      2. Applying lacquer
      3. Common problems with lacquer
    11. Varnish
      1. Characteristics of varnish
      2. Applying varnish
      3. Common problems applying varnish
    12. Water-Based Finishes
      1. Understanding water-based finishes
      2. Characteristics of water-based finishes
      3. Applying water-based finishes
    13. Conversion Finishes
      1. Characteristics of conversion finishes
      2. Applying conversion finishes
    14. Choosing a Finish
      1. Appearance, protection, and durability
      2. Ease of application and safety
      3. How to choose the best finish for the job
    15. “Finishing” the Finish
      1. Factors in rubbing a finish
      2. Steel wool and synthetic steel wool
      3. Leveling and rubbing to a high gloss
    16. Caring for Wood Finishes
      1. Causes of finish deterioration
      2. Preventing finish deterioration
      3. How to choose the right finish maintenance product
    17. Repairing Finishes
      1. Repairing superficial damage
      2. Repairing color damage
      3. Repairing deep scratches and gouges
    18. Finishing Different Woods
      1. Pine, oak, walnut, and mahogany
      2. Hard maple, cherry, ash, elm, and chestnut
      3. Aromatic red cedar
      4. Birch
      5. Oily woods
    19. Strippers
      1. Stripping solvents and chemicals
      2. Choosing which stripper to use


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 159 - Furniture Design and Construction

    3 Credits, 5 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 3 lab periods

    Wood furniture-making techniques for hobbyists and professionals. Includes basic material; tools and equipment safety and use; basic techniques and joint construction; advanced areas of furniture construction; metal fittings/fasteners and their application; advanced techniques in furniture making; drafting and workshop geometry; furniture designs and construction details; and restoration, repairs, and wood finishing.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 147  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic materials used in furniture making.
    2. Demonstrate the safe use of tools and equipment for furniture making.
    3. Demonstrate basic techniques and joint construction for furniture.
    4. Demonstrate advanced areas of furniture construction.
    5. Discuss metal fittings/fasteners and their application in furniture making.
    6. Demonstrate advanced furniture making techniques.
    7. Demonstrate the use of drafting and workshop geometry.
    8. Demonstrate various furniture designs and construction details.
    9. Discuss restoration, repairs, and wood finishing techniques.

    Outline:
    1. Basic Materials
      1. Woods (hardwoods and softwoods)
      2. Veneers and manufactured boards
      3. Plastics, leathers, and metals
      4. Adhesives and abrasives
    2. Tools and Equipment Safety and Use
      1. Cabinet maker’s bench and accessories
      2. Hand tools
      3. Portable power tools and accessories
      4. Woodworking machinery
      5. Workshop layout and furnishings
    3. Basic  Techniques and Joint Construction
      1. Wood preparation
      2. Edge jointing, dadoes, and rabbets
      3. Mortise and tenon and dowel joints
      4. Dovetailing
      5. Miters, scribes, and scarf joints
    4. Advanced Areas of Furniture Construction
      1. Carcass construction
      2. Leg and frame construction
      3. Door, drawer, and tray construction
      4. Fall flaps, secretaries, cylinder falls, and tambours
    5. Metal Fittings/Fasteners and their Applications
      1. Screws, nails and pins
      2. Hinges and locks
      3. Stays, bookcase fittings and castors
      4. Catches, bolts and handles
      5. Knock-up and knock-down fittings
    6. Advanced Techniques in Furniture Making
      1. Veneering, marquetry and inlay
      2. Table Lining
      3. Mouldings and lippings/edgings
      4. Curved work
    7. Drafting and Workshop Geometry
      1. Drawing office
      2. Common projections
      3. Perspective drawing
      4. Useful Geometry for furniture building
    8. Furniture Designs and Construction Details
      1. Tables and desks
      2. Chests, cabinets and sideboards
      3. Bedroom furniture
      4. Seating and upholstery
      5. Furniture for religious worship
      6. Miscellaneous furniture
    9. Restoration, Repairs and Wood Finishing
      1. Structural repairs
      2. Surface damage
      3. Wood finishing basics


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 172 - Electrical I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Concepts and procedures for building and construction electrical training. Includes safety, conduit bending, electrical theory, test equipment, National Electric Code, aceways, boxes, and fittings, print reading, and wiring applications.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115  substitute for BCT 105 . BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe electrical safety procedures on the job site.
    2. Perform conduit bending requirements.
    3. Demonstrate the use of anchors and supports.
    4. Describe the use of electrical theory, including Ohm’s law series and parallel circuits for direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC).
    5. Demonstrate the use of electrical test equipment.
    6. Discuss the layout and types of information found in the National Electric Code (NEC).
    7. Explain raceways, boxes, and fittings.
    8. Describe the types and applications of conductors.
    9. Read electrical prints.
    10. Perform commercial and industrial wiring.
    11. Perform residential wiring.

    Outline:
    1. Electrical Safety
      1. Electrical hazards
      2. Job site setup
      3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements at a job site
      4. Mandated lockout and tagout procedures
    2. Conduit Bending
      1. Hand operated benders
      2. Step conduit benders
      3. Cutting conduit
      4. Reaming and threading conduit
    3. Anchors and Supports
      1. Hardware used by electricians
      2. Systems used to mount and support boxes
      3. Installation safety
      4. Practical installation of anchors and supports
    4. Electrical Theory
      1. Ohm’s law
      2. Electrical terms
      3. Atomic theory
      4. Electromotive force
      5. Resistance
      6. Electrical power equations
      7. Series circuits
      8. Parallel circuits
      9. Complex series and parallel circuits
      10. Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws
      11. Circuit analysis
    5. Electrical Test Equipment
      1. Selection
      2. Inspection
      3. Maintenance
      4. Proper test procedures
      5. Safety rules
      6. Practical use of test equipment
    6. National Electric Code
      1. Layout of the National Electric Code
      2. Types of information in the National Electric Code
      3. Problems using information in the National Electric Code handbook
    7. Raceways, Boxes, and Fittings
      1. Application of raceways
      2. Applications of wireways
      3. Applications of ducts
      4. National Electrical Code requirements
      5. Practical applications of installing raceways, boxes and fittings
    8. Conductors
      1. Types and applications of conductors
      2. Proper wiring techniques
      3. National Electric Code applications
    9. Electrical Print Reading
      1. Electrical prints
      2. Drawings and symbols
      3. Information found on prints
      4. One line print
      5. Wiring diagrams
    10. Electrical Wiring Commercial and Industrial
      1. Electrical devices
      2. Wiring techniques
        1. Construction
        2. Maintenance
      3. Mounting devices
      4. Making splices
      5. Installing receptacles
      6. National Electric Code applications
      7. Local electrical code applications
      8. Practical applications of commercial and industrial wiring installations
    11. Electrical Wiring Residential
      1. Electrical devices
      2. Wiring techniques
      3. Making service calculations
      4. National Electric Code applications
      5. Local code requirements


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 173 - Electrical II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 172 . Includes alternating current, motor installation, grounding of structures and equipment, conduit bending, electrical boxes and fittings, and conductor installations.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 172  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the applications of alternating current and calculations required in Ohm’s law.
    2. Discuss the application of Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) motors.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to properly ground electrical installations.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to bend conduit with hand, mechanical, and electrical benders.
    5. Demonstrate the use of electrical boxes and fittings.
    6. Describe the methods necessary to rig and transport wire conductors to the job site.

    Outline:
    1. Alternating Current
      1. Characteristics of Alternating Current (AC)
      2. Application of Ohm’s law to AC circuits
    2. Motor Installation
      1. Theory and application
      2. Direct Current (DC) motors
      3. Alternating Current (AC) motors
      4. Circuits and connections
    3. Grounding of Structures and Equipment
      1. Purpose of grounding
      2. Bonding and grounding procedures
      3. National Electric Code (NEC) bonding and grounding requirements
    4. Conduit Bending
      1. Types of bends in all type of conduits
      2. Mechanical bending
      3. Hydraulic benders
      4. Electric benders
    5. Electrical Boxes and Fittings
      1. Outlet boxes
      2. NEC application to use of boxes
      3. Pull boxes
      4. Junction boxes
      5. Conduit and fittings
    6. Conductor Installations
      1. Transportation of conductors
      2. Methods of rigging
      3. Cable pulls in raceways and cable trays


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2011
  
  •  

    BCT 174 - Electrical III

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 173 . Includes conductor installation, cable tray, conductor termination and splices, electric service installation, circuit breakers and fuses, contactors and relays, and electrical lighting.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 173  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proper electrical conductor installations.
    2. Describe the installation process of cable trays.
    3. Demonstrate ability to perform conductor splicing in accordance with the National Electrical

    Code 

    4. Calculate electrical service size using the National Electric Code and describe the installation

    of electrical services.

    5. Describe the critical information on circuit breakers and fuses and demonstrate installation.

    6. Discuss the application differences between relays and contactors.

    7. Discuss the different types of electric lighting as they apply to residential, commercial, and in

    industrial applications.


    Outline:
    1. Conductor Installation
      1. Current carrying ability
      2. Skin effect
      3. National Electric Code (NEC) applications
    2. Cable Tray
      1. Applications
      2. Installations
      3. Type of compartments in tray
      4. Installation of conductors in cable tray
    3. Conductor Termination and Splices
      1. Types of splices
      2. Types of terminations
      3. Taping of splices
      4. Equipment use to make splices
    4. Electric Service Installation
      1. Residential
      2. Commercial
      3. Calculation of service size
      4. Use of the National Electric Code in determining size
    5. Circuit Breakers and Fuses
      1. Ampacity
      2. Multi-pole breakers
      3. Split breakers
      4. Fuse sizing
      5. Type of fuse to use
      6. Ratings of a fuse
    6. Contactors and Relays
      1. Types of relays
      2. Types of contactors
      3. Motor controllers
      4. Star-Delta controllers
    7. Electrical Lighting
      1. Principles of illumination
      2. Light sources available
      3. Applications/installations
        1. Residential
        2. Commercial
        3. Industrial


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19

  
  •  

    BCT 181 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing I

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Introduction to common types of piping, their proper fitting, fixtures, and distribution systems. Includes introduction to the plumbing trade and drawings; plastic, copper, cast-iron, and carbon steel piping; fixtures and faucets; introduction to drainage, waste, and vent (DWV) systems; and water distribution systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115  substitute for BCT 105 , BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the concepts of the plumbing trade utilizing historic as well as modern technologies.
    2. Demonstrate the proper use of hand and power tools.
    3. Identify and read components of plumbing drawings.
    4. Demonstrate the basic safety precautions for the installation, operation, and maintenance of plastic tubing and fittings.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to properly measure, ream, cut, and join copper piping.
    6. Discuss the ability to properly measure, cut, and join cast-iron piping.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to properly measure, cut, and join carbon steel piping.
    8. Identify types of corrugated stainless steel tubing.
    9. Demonstrate installing bathroom faucets, a kitchen sink with garbage disposal, and a toilet.
    10. Identify types and parts of a trap; explain the importance of traps, and how traps lose their seals.
    11. Explain the relationships between components of a water distribution system.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to the Plumbing Profession
      1. History of plumbing
      2. Modern plumbing
        1. Water conservation
        2. Low flow fixtures
      3. Career opportunities in the construction industry
      4. Human relations
      5. Employer and employ safety obligations
    2. Introduction to Plumbing Tools and Math
      1. Select and use plumbing hand and power tools
      2. Review basic math concepts
    3. Introduction to Plumbing Drawing
      1. Components of construction drawings
      2. Reading plumbing drawings
      3. Types of drawings
    4. Plastic Pipe and Fittings
      1. Materials
      2. Common fittings
      3. Hangers and supports
      4. Measuring, cutting and joining
    5. Copper Pipe and Fittings
      1. Materials
      2. Common fittings and valves
      3. Hangers and pipe supports
      4. Measuring, cutting, reaming, bending, and joining
      5. Safety
    6. Cast-Iron Pipe and Fittings
      1. Materials
      2. Common fittings and valves
      3. Hangers and supports
      4. Measuring, cutting, joining, and assembling
    7. Carbon Steel Pipe and Fittings
      1. Materials
      2. Common fittings and valves
      3. Hangers and supports
      4. Measuring, cutting, joining, and assembling
    8. Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing
      1. Flexible plastic-coated tubing
      2. Piping system components
      3. Connections and installation options
    9. Fixtures and Faucets
      1. Materials used to make fixtures
      2. Basic types of fixtures
      3. Faucets
        1. Low flow
        2. No scalding
    10. Introduction to Drain, Waste, and Vent (DWV) Systems
      1. DWV systems
      2. Fixture drains
      3. Traps
      4. Vents
      5. Sizing drains and vents
      6. Fittings and their applications
      7. Grade
      8. Building drain
      9. Building sewer
      10. Sewer main
      11. Waste treatment
    11. Introduction to Water Distribution Systems
      1. Sources of water
        1. Public
        2. Private
        3. Roof
      2. Water treatment
      3. Supply and distribution
      4. Building supply
      5. Building distribution
      6. Fixtures and faucets


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 182 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Concepts and practices for plumbing. Includes offsets around obstructions, reading commercial drawings, installing and testing drainage, waste, and vent (DWV) piping system, installing roof, floor and area drains, and servicing various types of valves.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 181  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Calculate 45-degree offsets around obstructions.
    2. Do a material takeoff for drainage, waste, and vent (DWV) and water supply systems from information shown on drawings.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to test a DWV system.
    4. Install a roof, floor, and area drain.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to service various types of valves.

    Outline:
    1. Offsets Around Obstructions
      1. Applied math
      2. Rolling offsets
      3. Calculating rolling offsets with a framing square
      4. Calculating 45 – degree offsets around obstructions
    2. Reading Commercial Drawings
      1. Overview of commercial drawings
      2. Working with blueprints
      3. The worksheet drawings
    3. Installing and Testing DWV Piping
      1. Plans
      2. Basic framing for lavatories and sinks
      3. Determining the location of the stack
      4. Change of direction of the building drain
      5. Installing the main stack
      6. Plumbing in slab-on-grade construction
      7. Installing pipe hangers and supports
      8. Grade
      9. Modifying the structural members
      10. Testing and inspecting DWV piping
    4. Installing Roof, Floor, and Area Drains
      1. Basic parts of drains
      2. Special drains
      3. Determining requirements for floor drains
      4. Installing floor and area drains
      5. Installing roof drains
    5. Servicing Various Types of Valves
      1. How valves operate
      2. Types of valves
      3. Special valves
      4. Materials
      5. Valve ratings
      6. Types of stems
      7. Bonnets
      8. End connections
      9. Repairing valves


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 183 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing III

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 182 . Concepts and installation procedures for water service, fixtures, and appliances. Includes installing and testing water supply piping, fixtures, valves, and faucets; electrical applications; water heaters; fuel gas systems; and servicing of fixtures, valves, and faucets.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 182  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to safely size and install a water service line and provide for water hammer protection.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to install bathtubs, shower stalls, valves, faucets, water closets, urinals, lavatories, sinks, and pop-up drains.
    3. Demonstrate the use of proper electrical measuring equipment.
    4. Install an electric water and a gas heater.
    5. Design, size, purge, and test fuel gas systems.
    6. Identify the proper procedures for repairing and maintaining fixtures and faucets.

    Outline:
    1. Installing and Testing Water Supply Piping
      1. Plans
      2. Main to meter water service
      3. Water heater, softener, and hose bibbs
      4. Locating the fixtures
      5. Installing pipe hangers and supports
      6. Modifying the structural members
      7. Main supply lines
      8. Completing the installation
      9. Testing
    2. Installing Fixtures, Valves, and Faucets
      1. Before you install the fixtures
      2. Installing bathtubs and shower stalls
      3. Installing valves and faucets
      4. Installing valves for water closets and urinals
      5. Installing lavatories, sinks, and pop-up drains
      6. Installing water closets
      7. Installing urinals
    3. Introduction to Electricity
      1. Voltage
      2. Current
      3. Resistance
      4. Ohms Law
      5. Circuits
    4. Installing Water Heaters
      1. Basic operation of water heaters
      2. Types of water heaters
      3. Indirect water heaters
      4. Selecting water heaters
      5. Installing water heaters
    5. Fuel Gas Systems
      1. Types of oil and gas used as fuels
      2. Common factors in fuel systems
      3. Factors specific to gas, LPG, and fuel oil systems
    6. Servicing of Fixtures, Valves and Faucets
      1. Servicing of fixtures, valves and faucets
      2. Types of valves
      3. Problems caused by installation and water


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 184 - National Electrical Code I

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Requirements for the installation of electrical conductors, equipment, raceways, cables, and special occupancies. Includes introduction to the National Electrical Code, wiring and protection, wiring methods and materials, and equipment for general use.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 172  
    Information: BCT 184 and BCT 284  together provide preparation for the National Electrical Code certification exam.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the scope, arrangement, definitions, and installation requirements of the code.
    2. Discuss the procedures for installing and protecting electrical circuits.
    3. Describe the procedures for correctly sizing and installing the proper conductors, cables, boxes, raceways, and fittings.
    4. Discuss the general requirements, construction specifications, and installation of the various types of general equipment used in electrical circuits.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to the National Electrical Code
      1. Article 90 Introduction
      2. Article 100 Definitions
      3. Article 110 Requirements for electrical installations
    2. Wiring and Protection
      1. Article 200 Use and identification of grounded neutral conductor
      2. Article 210 Branch circuits   
      3. Article 215 Feeders
      4. Article 220 Branch-circuit, feeder, and service calculations
      5. Article 225 Outside wiring
      6. Article 230 Services
      7. Article 240 Overcurrent protection
      8. Article 250 Grounding and bonding
      9. Article 280 Surge arresters
      10. Article 285 Transient Voltage Surge Suppressors (TVSSs)
    3. Wiring Methods and Materials    
      1. Article 300 Wiring methods
      2. Article 310 Conductors for general wiring
      3. Article 312 Cabinets, cutout boxes, and meter socket enclosures
      4. Article 314 Outlet, device, pull and junction boxes, conduit bodies, and handhole enclosures
      5. Article 320 Armored Cable (Type AC)
      6. Article 330 Metal-clad Cable (Type MC)
      7. Article 334 Nonmetallic-sheathed Cable (Types NM and NMC)
      8. Article 336 Power and control Tray Cable (Type TC)
      9. Article 338 Service-Entrance cables (Type SE and USE)
      10. Article 340 Underground Feeder and branch-circuit cable (Type UF)
      11. Article 342 Intermediate Metal Conduit (Type IMC)
      12. Article 344 Rigid Metal Conduit (Type RMC)    
      13. Article 348 Flexible Metal Conduit (Type FMC)
      14. Article 350 Liquidtight Flexible Metal Conduit (Type LMFC)
      15. Article 352 Rigid Nonmetallic Conduit (Type RNC)
      16. Article 353 High-Density Polyethylene Conduit (Type HDPE)
      17. Article 354 Nonmetallic Underground Conduit with Conductors (Type NUCC)
      18. Article 356 Liquidtight Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit (Type LFNC)
      19. Article 358 Electric Metallic Tubing (Type EMT)
      20. Article 362 Electrical Nonmetallic Tubing (Type ENT)
      21. Article 376 Metal wireways
      22. Article 378 Nonmetallic wireways
      23. Article 380 Multioutlet assembly
      24. Article 384 Strut-type channel raceways
      25. Article 386 Surface metal raceways
      26. Article 388 Surface nonmetallic raceways
      27. Article 392 Cable trays
    4. Equipment for General Use
      1. Article 400 Flexible cords and flexible cables 
      2. Article 402 Fixture wires
      3. Article 404 Switches
      4. Article 408 Switchboards and panelboards
      5. Article 410 Luminaires, lampholders, and lamps
      6. Article 411 Lighting systems operating at 30V or less
      7. Article 422 Appliances
      8. Article 424 Fixed electric space-heating  
      9. Article 430 Motors, motor circuits, and controllers
      10. Article 440 Air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment
      11. Article 445 Generators
      12. Article 450 Transformers and transformer vaults
      13. Article 460 Capacitors


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2012
  
  •  

    BCT 190 - Fieldwork for Construction

    1-8 Credits, 5-40 Contact Hours
    0 lecture periods 5-40 lab periods

    Supervised fieldwork experience on a specific construction project at the project site.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 105  and BCT 107 .
    Information: May be taken two times for a maximum of sixteen credit hours. If this course is to be repeated, see a financial aid or Veteran’s Affairs advisor to determine funding eligibility as appropriate. BCT course work or field experience will be necessary for success in this course. See a BCT instructor or department chair for more information. BCT 100 , BCT 112 , and BCT 115  substitute for BCT 105 , BCT 111 , BCT 113 , and BCT 114  substitute for BCT 107 .
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Develop goals for the fieldwork experience.
    2. Identify project for approval by the instructor of record/department chair.
    3. Develop a plan for fieldwork training.

    Outline:

    To be determined by the student and instructor of record/department chair.


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017
  
  •  

    BCT 202 - Construction Business Management

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Overview of construction business and project management. Includes planning and organizing, risk management, project management, estimating, scheduling, environmental and safety laws, employer obligations, financial management, contract law, and Arizona state requirements for contractors.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Design, plan, organize and choose the form of business needed.
    2. Determine the risk involved in starting a business.
    3. Describe all the components of project management.
    4. Develop an estimate for a construction job.
    5. Develop a procedure for scheduling a construction job.
    6. Determine the environmental and safety considerations for construction work.
    7. Determine employer obligations for a construction company.
    8. Describe financial management plan for construction industry.
    9. Describe contract laws related to construction.
    10. Describe the state requirements for Arizona contractors.

    Outline:
    1. Planning and Organizing
      1. Business ownership
      2. How to choose the form of business wanted
        1. Sole proprietorship
        2. Corporation
        3. Other forms of organizations
        4. Business plan
        5. Establishing a business
    2. Risk Management
      1. Contracts and insurance protection against risk
      2. Bonding for liability protection
        1. Contracting risk
        2. Insurance
        3. Types of policies
        4. Bonding
        5. Warranties
    3. Project Management
      1. Efficient use of materials, labor, equipment, and subcontractors
      2. Project budget
      3. Schedule
      4. Pay reports
      5. Shop drawings and submittals
      6. Change orders
      7. Job records
        1. Project superintendent
        2. Reports and records
        3. Quality control
        4. Material control
        5. Schedules
        6. Budget control
    4. Estimating
      1. Cost determination
      2. Accounting
      3. Cost control
      4. Scheduling
      5. Purchasing
      6. Construction work
        1. Bidding
        2. Material takeoff
        3. Estimating labor cost
        4. Equipment needs
        5. Security
        6. Overhead
        7. Profit
        8. Control
    5. Scheduling
      1. Phase controls
      2. Resource requirements
        1. Benefits of scheduling
        2. Planning
        3. Scheduling
        4. Control function
    6. Environmental and Safety Laws
      1. Pollution control
      2. Statutes and laws
        1. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
        2. Design and site consideration
        3. Water quality
        4. Air quality
        5. Solid and hazardous waste
        6. Legal consequences
        7. Federal regulations
        8. Contractor obligations
    7. Employer Obligations
      1. Laws dealing directly with relationships between the employer and the employees
      2. Fair labor standard act
        1. Workers compensation
        2. Americans with disabilities
        3. Immigration and naturalization
        4. Unemployment compensation
        5. Child support enforcement
        6. Payment of taxes
        7. Payroll reports
        8. Personnel files
    8. Financial Management
      1. Financial plan for success in the construction industry
      2. Accounting procedures for the construction industry
        1. Accounting system
        2. Documents
        3. Journals
        4. Cash basis
        5. Accrual basis
        6. Contracts
        7. Balance statements
        8. Income statements
        9. Working capital
    9. Contract Law
      1. What is a contract?
      2. Contract types
      3. Breach of contract
      4. Acceptance  
      5. Oral vs. written
      6. General contracting terms
    10. Arizona State Requirements for Contractors
      1. Obtaining a contractor’s license
      2. Incorporating a business
      3. Arizona business taxes
      4. Arizona payroll requirements
      5. Arizona income taxes
      6. Lien laws
      7. Safety regulations
      8. Contractor laws
      9. Rule and regulations


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 231 - Residential and Industrial HVAC IV

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 134 . Includes refrigerants and oil, compressors, metering devices, retail refrigeration systems, commercial hydronic systems, and steam systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 134  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Perform a refrigerant leak detection procedure.
    2. Perform electrical troubleshooting checks on a single phase compressor.
    3. Identify various types of metering devices.
    4. Demonstrate the proper cleaning procedures for an ice machine.
    5. Explain the terms and concepts used when working with hot water heating and chilled water cooling systems.
    6. Describe the basic steam heating cycle.

    Outline:
    1. Refrigerants and Oils
      1. Refrigerant structure
      2. Refrigerant identification
      3. Refrigerant composition
      4. Refrigerant leaks
      5. Lubrication oils
      6. Oil and the refrigeration system
      7. Oil handling guidelines
      8. System conversion
    2. Compressors
      1. Role of compressors
      2. Open, hermetic, and semi hermetic compressors
      3. Types of compressors
      4. Capacity control of compressors
      5. Compressor electric drive motors
      6. Other compressor protection devices
      7. Reduced voltage motor starting
      8. Causes of compressor failure
      9. System checkout following compressor failure
      10. Compressor change out
    3. Metering Devices
      1. Basic operation
      2. Fixed metering devices
      3. Expansion valves
      4. Distributors
      5. TXV replacement
      6. Metering device problems
    4. Retail Refrigeration Systems
      1. Mechanical refrigeration systems
      2. Defrost systems
      3. Retail refrigeration equipment and fixtures
      4. Common refrigeration system controls
      5. Troubleshooting
    5. Commercial Hydronic Systems
      1. Water concept review
      2. Commercial hot water heating system components
      3. Chilled water cooling systems
      4. Chilled water system components
      5. Dual temperature water systems
      6. Commercial water piping systems
      7. Water system balancing
    6. Steam Systems
      1. Fundamentals and properties of water
      2. Steam cycle principles of operation
      3. Steam boilers, boiler controls, and accessories
      4. Valves
      5. Heat exchangers/converters
      6. Terminals
      7. Steam traps and strainers
      8. Troubleshooting steam traps
      9. Condensate return and feedwater system components

    J.         Flash tanks

    K.         Steam system piping

    L          Steam and condensate pipe sizing

    M.        Boiler blowdown and skimming

    N.         Boiler water treatment


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010
  
  •  

    BCT 232 - Residential and Industrial HVAC V

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 231 . Includes planned maintenance, water treatment, troubleshooting electronic controls, troubleshooting oil heating, troubleshooting heat pumps, and troubleshooting accessories.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 231  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe planned maintenance and service procedures required for selected HVAC equipment and components.
    2. Demonstrate how to test water using a water analysis test kit.
    3. Analyze circuit diagrams and other manufacturers’ literature to determine the operating sequence of microprocessor controlled systems.
    4. Describe the safety precautions that must be taken when servicing oil heating systems.
    5. Demonstrate how to isolate and correct malfunctions in a heat pump using the correct tools and instruments.
    6. Identify and properly use the service instruments needed to troubleshoot HVAC system accessories.

    Outline:
    1. Planned Maintenance
    1. Fossil fuel heating appliances
    2. Cooling units
    3. Heat pumps
    4. Accessories
    1. Water Treatment
      1. Water characteristics and analysis
      2. Problems caused by using untreated water
      3. Water treatment in open recirculating water systems
      4. Water treatment in closed recirculating water systems
      5. Water treatment in steam boilers and systems
      6. Mechanical water treatment equipment
      7. General water treatment procedures and guidelines
      8. Water treatment chemical safety precautions
    2. Troubleshooting Electronic Controls
      1. Microprocessor controls
      2. Troubleshooting microprocessor-controlled systems
      3. External causes of failure
      4. Electronic controls in heating systems
      5. Cooling systems and heat pumps
      6. Test instruments
      7. Standardization
    3. Troubleshooting Oil Heating
      1. Typical operation
      2. Oil burner troubleshooting
      3. Troubleshooting controls
      4. System troubleshooting
      5. Condensing oil furnaces
    4. Troubleshooting Heat Pumps    
    1. Heat pump operation
    2. Electrical operating sequence
    3. Troubleshooting
    1. Troubleshooting Accessories
    1. Troubleshooting approach
    2. Humidifiers
    3. Electronic air cleaners
    4. Ultraviolet lamps
    5. Economizers, zone control, and heat recovery ventilators


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 233 - Residential and Industrial HVAC VI

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 232 . Includes construction drawings and specifications, indoor air quality, energy conservation equipment, and building management systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 232  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Interpret shop drawings and apply them to the plans and specifications.
    2. Identify the causes and corrective actions used to remedy the more common indoor air problems.
    3. Identify selected energy conservation equipment and describe how they operate.
    4. Identify the major components of a building management system and describe how they fit together.

    Outline:
    1. Construction Drawings and Specifications
      1. Reading blueprints
      2. Request for information
      3. Specifications
      4. Shop drawings
      5. Submittals
      6. As-built drawings
      7. Takeoffs
    2. Indoor Air Quality
      1. Long-term and short-term effects of poor indoor air quality (IAQ)
      2. Good indoor air quality
      3. Sources of building contaminants
      4. Elements of a building IAQ inspection and survey
      5. Achieving acceptable indoor air quality
      6. IAQ and energy-efficient systems and equipment
      7. Gas detectors and analyzers
      8. Duct cleaning
      9. IAQ and forced-air duct systems
      10. HVAC contractor liability
    3. Energy Conservation Equipment
      1. Heat recovery and reclaim methods and equipment
      2. Economizers
      3. Heat recovery in steam systems
      4. Electric utility energy demand reduction systems
      5. Process system heat and energy recovery
    4. Building Management Systems
      1. Basic digital controller
      2. Direct digital control (DDC) network types
      3. Building management system architecture
      4. User interfaces
      5. Interoperability
      6. Interpreting front-end software
      7. Installation


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 234 - Residential and Industrial HVAC VII

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 233 . Includes water treatment, system startup and shutdown, heating and cooling system design, and commercial and industrial refrigeration systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 233  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the types of problems and related remedies associated with water problems that can occur in the different types of water and steam systems.
    2. Describe how to prepare, clean, start up, and shut down a steam boiler, hot-water boiler, reciprocating liquid chiller, centrifugal or screw liquid chiller, and an air handler and a forced-air distribution system, and demonstrate how to clean condenser tubes.
    3. Identify the steps in the system design process, the principles that affect the selection of equipment to satisfy the calculated heating and/or cooling load, and perform a load calculation of a residence.
    4. Identify the basic components, various accessories, control devices used, and perform an operational checkout of a commercial/industrial refrigeration system.

    Outline:
    1. Water Treatment
      1. Water characteristics and analysis
      2. Problems caused by using untreated water
      3. Water treatment in open recirculating water systems
      4. Water treatment in closed recirculating water systems
      5. Water treatment in steam boilers and systems
      6. Mechanical water treatment equipment
      7. General water treatment procedures and guidelines
      8. Water treatment chemical safety precautions
    2. System Startup and Shutdown
      1.  Steam/hot-water boilers and systems
      2.  Reciprocating chillers and water systems
      3.  Centrifugal chillers and water systems
      4.  Screw chillers and water systems
      5.  Cooling tower water systems
      6.  Air handling unit/air distribution system
      7.  Packaged year-round air-conditioning units
      8.  Post-shutdown maintenance
    3. Heating and Cooling System Design
      1.  Overview of the design process
      2.  Building evaluation/survey
      3.  Load estimating
      4.  Equipment selection
      5.  Air distribution system duct design
      6.  Support systems
      7.  Load estimating for commercial buildings

     

    IV. Commercial and Industrial Refrigeration Systems

    1.  Refrigeration and the preservation of food products
    2.  Refrigerated coolers and display equipment
    3.  Refrigerated transport units
    4.  Refrigeration systems and components
    5.  Refrigeration system control devices
    6.  Packaged ice making equipment
    7.  Refrigerants and refrigerant oils
    8.  Retrofit procedures guidelines
    9.  Ammonia systems
    10.  Secondary coolants


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19

  
  •  

    BCT 235 - National Electric Code Commercial Wiring Applications

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Commercial electrical wiring and installation practices conforming to the National Electric Code. Includes commercial building plans, specifications, and drawings, electrical loads and branch circuits, switches and receptacles, branch circuit installations, motor and appliance circuits, feeders, special systems and circuits, panelboard selection and installation, electric service equipment, lamps and luminaries, emergency and standby power systems, and overcurrent protection.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 135  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss the application of building plans, specifications, and working drawings.
    2. Determine the minimum lighting load for a given area and conductor selection.
    3. Demonstrate installation of various types of switches and receptacles.        
    4. Identify the installation requirements for a raceway, box, and fitting.
    5. Describe the appropriate method for installing electrical circuits and motors in appliances.
    6. Describe the minimum overcurrent protection device rating for feeders.
    7. Demonstrate how to select and install raceways and multioutlet assemblies.
    8. Demonstrate how to correctly place and number circuits in a panelboard.
    9. Describe the different service types.
    10. Identify the parts of the three most popular types of lamps.
    11. Describe an emergency power system.
    12. Demonstrate how to select and install overcurrent protection devices.

    Outline:
    1. Commercial Building Plans, Specifications, and Drawings
      1. Commercial building specifications
        1. General clauses and conditions
        2. Supplementary general conditions
      2. Working drawings
        1. Blueprints
        2. Electrical symbols
    2. Electrical Loads and Branch Circuits
      1. Lighting load calculations
        1. Lighting loads
        2. Other loads
      2. Conductor selection
        1. Type
        2. Size
        3. Components
    1. Switches and Receptacles
      1. Receptacles
        1. Hospital grade
        2. Ground fault circuit interrupters
      2. Snap switches
        1. Types
        2. Connections
    1. Branch Circuit Installations
      1. Raceways
        1. Types
        2. Installation
      2. Boxes and fittings
        1. Styles
        2. Sizing
    2. Motor and Appliance Circuits
      1. Appliance
        1. Over current protection
        2. Grounding
      2. Basics of motor circuits
        1. Disconnecting means
        2. Overload protection
    3. Feeders  
      1. Requirements
        1. Overcurrent protection
        2. Conductors
      2. Component selection
        1. Size
        2. Harmonics
    4. Special Systems and Circuits
      1. Surface metal raceways
      2. Multioutlet assemblies
        1. Loading allowances
        2. Receptacle wiring
      3. Communications systems
        1. Telephone
        2. Power
      4. Sump pump control
      5. Boiler control
    5. Panelboard Selection and Installation
      1. Construction
        1. Sizing
        2. Overcurrent protection
      2. Installation
    6. Electric Service Equipment
      1. Transformers
        1. Protection
        2. Connection
      2. Service entrance
        1. Metering
        2. Grounding
        3. Ground fault protection
    1. Lamps and Luminaries
      1. Lamps
        1. Types
        2. Application
        3. Characteristics
      2. Luminaries
        1. Types
        2. Select
        3. Install
    2. Emergency and Standby Power Systems
      1. Legal Requirements
      2. Sources of power
      3. Emergency generator source
    3. Overcurrent Protection
      1. Fuses and circuit breakers
        1. Type
        2. Class
        3. Rating
      2. Calculations           
      3. Conduction protection
        1. Withstand rating
        2. Heating


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 236 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing IV

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 183 . Concepts that apply to plumbing installations. Includes applied math, sizing water supply piping, potable water treatment, and backflow preventers.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 183  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify the weights and measures used in the English and metric systems.
    2. Demonstrate how to size pipe for different flow rates.
    3. Demonstrate how to install water-conditioning equipment.
    4. Describe the principles of backflow due to back siphonage or back pressure.

    Outline:
    1. Applied Math
      1. Weights and measures
      2. Measuring area and volume
      3. Temperature, pressure and force
      4. Simple machines
    2. Sizing Water Supply Piping
      1. Factors affecting water supply piping
      2. Laying out the water supply system
      3. Sizing water supply piping
    3. Potable Water Treatment
      1. Installation of water-conditioning equipment
      2. Disinfecting the water supply
      3. Filtering and softening the water supply
      4. Troubleshooting water supply problems
    4. Backflow Preventers
      1. Backflow and cross-connections
      2. Types of backflow preventers
      3. Specialty backflow preventers


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 237 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing V

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 236 . Includes types of venting; sizing DWV and storm systems; sewage pumps and sump pumps; corrosive resistant waste piping; and compressed air.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 236  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate how to construct a vent system.
    2. Calculate the size of building drains and sewer systems.
    3. Demonstrate how to disassemble, repair, and reassemble a sump pump.
    4. Demonstrate how to connect corrosive resistant piping together using the proper techniques and materials.
    5. Identify components of compressed air systems.

    Outline:
    1. Types of Venting
      1. How vents work
      2. Designing a vent installation
      3. Types of vents
    2. Sizing DWV and Storm Systems
      1. Sizing drain, waste, and vent systems
      2. Sizing storm drainage systems
    3. Sewage Pumps and Sump Pumps
      1. Sewage removal systems
      2. Storm water removal systems
      3. Troubleshooting and repairing sewage and storm water removal systems
    4. Corrosive Resistant Waste Piping
      1. Types of corrosive waste
      2. Pipe materials for corrosive wastes
      3. Installing corrosive resistant waste piping systems
      4. Hazard communications
    5. Compressed Air
      1. Working safely with compressed air
      2. Principles of compressed air systems
      3. Components of compressed air systems
      4. Installing compressed air systems


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 238 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing VI

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 237 . Includes concepts and practices essential to competitive and successful plumbing businesses. Also includes business principles for plumbers, introductory skills for the crew leader, water pressure booster and recirculation systems, indirect and special waste, and hydronic and solar heating systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 237  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe how components of cost relate to profit and loss in the plumbing business.
    2. Discuss current issues and organizational structure in the construction industry today.
    3. Explain the maintenance and basic troubleshooting processes for water pressure booster systems.
    4. Identity the components of a indirect waste system
    5. Describe the procedures for roughing-in and testing of the piping in hydronic or solar heating systems.

    Outline:
    I.          Business Principles for Plumbers

                A.         On-the-job task organization

                B.         Introductory Skills for the Crew Leader

               C.         Orientation to the job

    II.          Leadership Skills

    1.       Safety
    2.       Project Control

    III.         Water Pressure Booster and Recirculation Systems

                A.         Water pressure booster systems

                B.         Recirculation systems

    IV.        Indirect and Special Waste

                A.         Indirect systems

                B.         Special waste systems

    V.         Hydronic and Solar Heating

                A.         Principles of hydronic and solar heating systems

                B.         Types of hydronic and solar heating systems

                C.         Installing hydronic and solar heating systems


    Effective Term:
    Fall 2010

  
  •  

    BCT 239 - Residential and Industrial Plumbing VII

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 238 . Includes codes; servicing piping systems, fixtures, and appliances; private water supply well systems; private waste disposal systems; swimming pools and hot tubs; and plumbing for mobile homes and travel trailers.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 238  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT coursework or field experience will be necessary for success in this course. See a BCT instructor or department chair for more information.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the procedures for modifying plumbing codes.
    2. Describe different types of corrosion and their effects on pipes.
    3. Identify the qualities of a good well.
    4. Discuss the installation and maintenance of private waste disposal systems.
    5. Identify swimming pool, hot tub systems, and components. 
    6. State code issues and drainage, waste, and vent (DWV) systems specific to mobile home parks and travel trailer parks.

    Outline:
    1. Codes
      1. History of codes
      2. Model codes
      3. How codes work
      4. Typical chapters of a model code
      5. The worksheet
    2. Servicing Piping Systems, Fixtures, and Appliances
      1. General guidelines for service calls
      2. Servicing water supply systems
      3. Servicing DWV systems
      4. Pipe corrosion
      5. Servicing plumbing fixtures
      6. Installing additional fixtures and appliances
    3. Private Water Supply Well Systems
      1. Drilling wells
      2. Selecting and installing pumps
      3. Selecting and installing water supply lines
      4. Selecting and installing water storage tanks
    4. Private Waste Disposal Systems
      1. Types of private waste disposal systems
      2. Locating and sizing soil absorption systems
      3. Installing private waste disposal systems
      4. Cleaning and servicing septic and aeration tanks
    5. Swimming Pools and Hot Tubs
      1. Private swimming pools
      2. Hot tubs and spas
      3. The Worksheet
    6. Plumbing for Mobile Homes and Travel Trailers
      1. Plumbing for mobile homes and travel trailers
      2. Water supply and DWV systems for mobile home parks
      3. Water supply and DWV systems for travel trailer parks


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 245 - Carpentry II

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 145 . Includes techniques for reading construction drawings and specifications, site layout, measurement, and leveling, concrete materials and concrete reinforcement materials, construction of forms for footings and on-grade slabs, and concrete forms.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 145  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe techniques for reading and interpreting construction drawings.
    2. Describe principles, equipment, and methods used in site layout.
    3. Explain the properties of concrete and reinforcing materials.
    4. Construct forms for continuous, stepped continuous, pier, grade beam, and edge forms.
    5. Explain the applications and construction of concrete forms used for various types of job built forms, including wall, column, slab-and-beam, and stair forms.

    Outline:
    1. Techniques for Reading Construction Drawings and Specifications
      1. Read and interpret construction drawings
      2. Purpose of written specifications
        1. Symbols
        2. Lines
        3. Elevations
        4. Schedules
        5. Abbreviations
        6. Takeoffs
        7. Sections
    2. Site Layout, Measurement, and Leveling
      1. Principles and methods
      2. Equipment
        1. Builders Level
        2. Transit
      3. Layout responsibilities of surveyors, field engineers, and carpenters
      4. Site and plot plan drawings
        1. Convert measurements with equivalent measurements, feet to inches, decimal feet or fractions of feet or inches or vice versa
        2. Using taping and chaining equipment
        3. Pacing distances
        4. Builders level or transit and differential leveling procedures
        5. 3-4-5 rule for 90 degree angles
    3. Concrete Materials and Concrete Reinforcement Materials
      1. Properties, characteristics, and uses of various types of cement, aggregates, and other additives
      2. Procedures for concrete volume estimates and testing of freshly mixed concrete
      3. Reinforcement materials used in concrete
        1. Various types of cement and their uses
        2. Slump testing
        3. Aggregates
        4. Casting
        5. Reinforcement
    4. Construction of Forms for Footings and On-grade Slabs
      1. Forming terms and parts of forms
      2. Procedures for constructing basic footings and edge forms
        1. Various kinds of footings
        2. Parts of footings and their purpose
        3. Parts of pier forms and their purpose
        4. Lay out and construct selected footing forms
        5. Strip forms
        6. Screeds
        7. Edge forms
        8. Continuous and step continuous forms
        9. Grade beam forms
    5. Concrete Forms
      1. Components of each type of form
      2. Erect, plumb, and brace concrete forms
        1. Basic, wall form with walers, and strongbacks
        2. Ganged wall form
        3. Radius wall form
        4. Column form
        5. Beam form and shoring
        6. Stair form
        7. Slab and beam forms


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 265 - Sustainability for Building Trades

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Fundamentals of sustainable design. Includes green building practices and implementation. Also includes green building concepts, site and building planning and development, materials, strategies, cost benefit analysis, and practical applications in the current construction business environment.

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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Discuss current green building standards.
    2. Explore strategies for employing green building design and development.
    3. Examine environmental impacts of building or not building green.
    4. Investigate economic impacts of building or not building green.
    5. Identify and research historical perspectives of green building practices.
    6. Develop a vocabulary of technical terms related to environmental projects with the impact of sustainable design.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to understand the roll of the owner, contractor, civil engineer, architect, building official and the LEED Accredited Professional (AP).
    8. Evaluate cost implication of green building.
    9. Discuss site development, sustainable water usage onsite, and impacts and control of water runoff.
    10. Explain site selection strategies.
    11. Discuss building commissioning, startup, and use with identification of key players.

    Outline:
    1. Green Building Fundamentals and Sustainability in the Building Industry
      1. The bottom line
      2. Economic, social, and environmental imperatives          
    2. Sustainable Design and Green Building
      1. Sustainable design practices
      2. Reduction, reuse, and recycling of materials
      3. Green building practices
      4. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
    3. Evaluating Cost Implications of Green Building
      1. Soft and capital costs
      2. Life-cycle cost and long term investment considerations
    4. Site Development Considerations
      1. Site evaluation
      2. Site development
      3. Brownfield development strategies
      4. Encouraging alternative transportation
      5. Reducing site disturbance
      6. Reducing heat island effect
      7. Reducing pollution of site from building and lighting
      8. Building orientation          
    5. Managing Site Water Runoff
      1. Erosion and sedimentation
      2. Stormwater management
    6. Improving Water Use Efficiency
      1. Water efficient landscaping
      2. Water efficient buildings
      3. Recycling wastewater
      4. Rainwater reuse
    7. Improving a Buildings Energy Efficiency
      1. Heating and cooling systems
      2. Passive solar heating and cooling
      3. Maximizing energy performance
    8. Renewable Energy Sources    
      1. Wind, photovoltaic,
      2. solar thermal, geothermal,
      3. hydroelectric, biomass, and tidal systems
    9. Onsite Renewable Energy Sources
      1. Photovoltaic
      2. Biomass
      3. Geothermal
      4. Wind
      5. Hybrid systems
    10. Improving a Building’s Material Use
      1. Reusing existing building stock
      2. Selecting building materials
      3. Recycled materials
      4. Material transportation impacts
      5. Rapidly renewable resources
      6. Recycling construction waste
    11. Improving a Building’s Indoor Environmental Quality
      1. Ventilation systems
      2. Methods for improving indoor air quality during construction


    Effective Term:
    Summer 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 271 - Electrical IV

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 174 . Includes load calculations-branch and feeder circuits, conductor selection and calculations, practical applications of lighting, hazardous locations, and overcurrent protection.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 174  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Use load calculations to determine branch circuit conductor size.
    2. Select conductors for various temperature ranges and atmospheres.
    3. Identify the general lighting pattern produced by each type of fixture.
    4. Define the various classifications of hazardous locations.
    5. Select and size overcurrent protection for specific applications.

    Outline:
    1. Load Calculations-Branch and Feeder Circuits
      1. Services
      2. Feeders
      3. Branch circuits
      4. Single and multi-motor circuits
    2. Conductor Selection and Calculations
      1. Selection
      2. Insulation
      3. Current carrying ability
      4. Temperature rating
    3. Practical Applications of Lighting
      1. Types
      2. Lamps
      3. Ballast
      4. Troubleshooting
      5. Controls
    4. Hazardous Locations
      1. Classes of hazards
      2. Components
      3. Seals
      4. Approved equipment
    5. Over Current Protection
      1. Fuses
      2. Circuit breakers


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 272 - Electrical V

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 271 . Includes distribution equipment, transformers, commercial electrical services, motor calculations, voice, data, and video, and motor controls.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 271  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the purpose of switchgear.
    2. Explain the NEC requirements governing the installation of transformers.
    3. Identify the NEC requirements and purposes of service grounding.
    4. Size and select overcurrent protection devices for motors.
    5. Define the different categories for voice-data-video (VDV) cabling systems.
    6. Select and size contactors and relays for use in specific electrical motor control systems.

    Outline:
    1. Distribution Equipment
      1. One-line drawings
      2. Load size
      3. Ground fault circuitry
    2. Transformers
      1. Types
      2. Construction
      3. Connections
      4. Protection
      5. Grounding
    3. Commercial Electrical Services
      1. Components
      2. Installation considerations
      3. NEC requirements
    4. Motor Calculations
      1. Size conductors
      2. Grounding
      3. Wye and delta connections
      4. Capacitors
    5. Voice, Data, and Video
      1. Installation
      2. Termination
      3. Testing
    6. Motor Controls
      1. Cord and plug motor controllers
      2. Typical motor control circuits
      3. Electronic controls


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 273 - Electrical VI

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 272 . Includes load calculations-feeders and services, health care facilities, standby and emergency systems, basic electronic theory, fire alarm systems, and specialty transformers.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 272  or concurrent enrollment.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Calculate loads and ampacities for single-phase and three-phase feeders.
    2. Describe the categories and branch portions of the distributions circuits.
    3. Explain the difference between emergency systems, legally required standby systems, and optional standby systems.
    4. Identify electronic system components.
    5. Define the unique terminology associated with fire alarm systems.
    6. Identify various specialty transformer applications.

    Outline:
    1. Load Calculations-Feeders and Services
      1. Services
      2. Feeders
      3. Branch circuits
      4. Single and multi-motor circuits
    2. Health Care Facilities
      1. Installation of circuits
      2. Requirements for life safety
      3. Critical circuits
    3. Stand-by and Emergency Systems
      1. NEC requirements
      2. Electric generators
      3. Storage batteries
    4. Basic Electronic Theory
      1. Electronic motors
      2. Control circuits
    5. Fire Alarm Systems
      1. Security
      2. Fire
      3. Installation
    6. Specialty Transformers
      1. Potential
      2. Current
      3. Constant current
      4. Shielded
      5. Sizing
      6. Installation


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 274 - Electrical VII

    4 Credits, 6 Contact Hours
    2 lecture periods 4 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 273 . Includes advanced controls, signaling systems, specialty transformers, standby and emergency systems, welding machines, HVAC controls, and heat tracing and freeze protection.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 273  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the use of solid state controls.
    2. Demonstrate the proper installation procedures for security and fire systems.
    3. Discuss the installation of specialty transformers.
    4. Differentiate standby and emergency power systems.
    5. Discuss welding machines and their power requirements.
    6. Troubleshoot HVAC controls.
    7. Describe heat tracing and freeze protection.

    Outline:
    1. Advanced Controls
      1. Solid-state
      2. Motor breaking
      3. Safety interlocks
    2. Signaling Systems
      1. Security
      2. Fire
      3. Installation
    3. Specialty Transformers
      1. Potential
      2. Current
      3. Constant current
      4. Shielded
      5. Sizing
      6. Installation
    4. Standby and Emergency Systems
      1. Generators
      2. Batteries
    5. Welding Machines
      1. Types
      2. Method of operation
    6. HVAC Controls
      1. Internal controls
      2. Solid-state circuitry
      3. Safety controls
    7. Heat Tracing and Freeze Protection
      1. Installation techniques
      2. Resistance heating
      3. Impedance heating
      4. Skin effect heating


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2015
  
  •  

    BCT 284 - National Electrical Code II

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 184 . Includes introduction to the National Electrical Code, special occupancies, special equipment, special conditions, and communication systems.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 184  or concurrent enrollment.
    Information: BCT 184  and BCT 284 together provide preparation for the National Electrical Code certification exam.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the scope, arrangement, definitions, and installation requirements of the code.
    2. Discuss the hazards of the different types of environments, facilities, buildings, and installations.
    3. Describe the requirements for electrical equipment, lighting accessories, and wiring systems for relocatable wired partitions.
    4. Determine the requirements for emergency and standby power systems, interconnected power sources, and low-voltage, low-power wiring.
    5. Describe the wiring requirements for communications systems.

    Outline:
    1. Introduction to the National Electrical Code
      1. Article 90 Introduction
      2. Article 100 Definitions
      3. Article 110 Requirements for electrical installations
    2. Special Occupancies
      1. Article 500 Hazardous (classified) locations
      2. Article 510 Class I hazardous (classified) locations
      3. Article 502 Class II hazardous (classified) locations
      4. Article 503 Class III hazardous (classified) locations
      5. Article 504 Intrinsically safe systems
      6. Article 511 Commercial garages, repair, and storage
      7. Article 513 Aircraft hangers
      8. Article 514 Motor fuel dispensing facilities
      9. Article 517 Health care facilities
      10. Article 518 Assembly operations
      11. Article 525 Carnivals, circuses, fairs, and similar events
      12. Article 547 Agricultural buildings
      13. Article 550 Mobile homes, manufactured homes, and mobile home parks
      14. Article 551 Recreational vehicles and recreational vehicle parks
      15. Article 555 Marinas and boatyards
      16. Article 590 Temporary installations     
    3. Special Equipment
      1. Article 600 Electrical signs and outline lighting
      2. Article 604 Manufactured wiring systems   
      3. Article 605 Office furnishings (wired partitions)
      4. Article 620 Elevators, escalators, and moving walks
      5. Article 625 Electric vehicle charging systems
      6. Article 630 Electric welders
      7. Article 640 Audio signal processing, amplification, and reproduction equipment
      8. Article 645 Information technology equipment
      9. Article 647 Sensitive electronic equipment
      10. Article 680 Swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, fountains, and similar installations
      11. Article 690 Solar photovoltaic systems
      12. Article 692 Fuel cell systems
      13. Article 695 Fire pumps
    4. Special Conditions    
      1. Article 700 Emergency power systems
      2. Article 701 Legally required standby power systems
      3. Article 702 Optional standby power systems
      4. Article 720 Circuits and equipment operating at less than 50 volts
      5. Article 725 Class 1, class 2, and class 3 remote-control, signaling, and power-limited circuits
      6. Article 760 Fire alarm systems
      7. Article 770 Optical fiber cables and raceways
    5. Communication Systems
      1. Article 800 Communication circuits 
      2. Article 810 Radio and television equipment
      3. Article 820 Community Antenna Television (CATV) and radio distribution systems
      4. Article 830 Network-powered broadband communication systems


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19
  
  •  

    BCT 286 - International Residential Code (IRC) I

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Requirements of the major systems of residential building construction (other than commercial). Includes administration, definitions, building planning, foundations, floors, wall construction, wall covering, roof-ceiling construction, roof assemblies, chimneys and fireplaces.

    Recommendation: Completion of general construction field experience before enrolling in this course.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the administrative purpose of the code and the issuance of permits.
    2. Discuss the trade terms and definitions.
    3. Describe the building and planning criteria.
    4. Determine the foundation requirements.
    5. Determine the floor requirements.
    6. Determine the wall construction requirements.
    7. Determine the wall covering requirements.
    8. Determine the ceiling roof-construction requirements.
    9. Determine the roof assemblies requirements.
    10. Determine the chimneys and fireplace requirements.

    Outline:
    1. Administration
      1. Purpose of code
      2. Issuance of permits
    2. Definitions
      1. General
      2. Definitions
    3. Building and Planning
      1. Building design criteria
      2. Detail elements of consideration
    4. Foundations
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    5. Floors
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    6. Wall construction
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    7. Wall Covering
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    8. Ceiling Roof-Construction
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    9. Roof Assemblies
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    10. Chimneys and Fireplaces
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2017
  
  •  

    BCT 287 - International Residential Code (IRC) II

    3 Credits, 3 Contact Hours
    3 lecture periods 0 lab periods

    Continuation of BCT 286 . Includes energy efficiency, mechanical systems, plumbing systems, electrical systems, and referenced standards.

    Prerequisite(s): BCT 286  
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the energy-efficiency related requirements.
    2. Determine mechanical system requirements.
    3. Determine plumbing System requirements.
    4. Determine electrical system requirements.
    5. Discuss how to access the referenced standards.

    Outline:
    1. Energy-Efficiency
      1. Scope
      2. Compliance
    2. Mechanical Systems
      1. General requirements
      2. Provisions
    3. Plumbing Systems
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    4. Electrical Systems
      1. General requirements
      2. Materials
    5. Referenced Standards
      1. Agency
      2. Application


    Effective Term:
    Spring 2013
  
  •  

    BCT 290 - Building and Construction Technologies Capstone

    4 Credits, 10 Contact Hours
    1 lecture period 9 lab periods

    Supervised workplace placement in the building construction trades field. Includes the application of building construction concepts and techniques. Also includes critical thinking, problem solving, personnel management, leadership, oral and written communication skills.

    Information: Student must be working toward an AAS in Applied Technology . Satisfactory completion of pathway for three semesters or instructor approval. The students’ work experience is coordinated by a member of the College’s faculty or professional staff or by staff of the contracted/contracting agency; the primary supervision is from the employer or other individual contracted to provide the experience. Contingent on the agreement between the student and the employer, students may or may not receive remuneration for workplace learning experiences. Note: This definition applies to all experiences in which the student applies concepts and practices learned previously or concurrently to facilitated observation and/or practical work situations within an occupational field. BCT course work or field experience will be necessary for success in this course. See the BCT Department Head or Discipline Coordinator for more information.
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    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply technical skills as identified by recognized industry certification.
    2. Test theory to workplace application in the building construction trades.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a team.
    4. Evaluate career opportunities in the construction field.
    5. Demonstrate the following skills: critical thinking, problem solving, personnel management, leadership, oral and written communication.

    Outline:
    The following work experience plan and location is to be determined by the student and Department Head or Discipline Coordinator.

     

    1. Building Construction Technologies Plan
      1. Establish workplace placement
      2. Identify certification requirements
      3. Develop a workplace plan for internship, externship, practicum
    2. Building Construction Trades Application
      1. Determine concepts applied to learning
      2. Apply the concepts to the workplace environment
    3. Teamwork
      1. Identify teamwork concepts
      2. Apply the teamwork concepts to the plan
    4. Investigate Career Opportunities
      1. Identify short-term career opportunities
      2. Identify long-term career opportunities
    5. Demonstrate Critical-Thinking Skills Applied to the Plan
      1. Problem solving
      2. Personnel management
      3. Leadership
      4. Oral communication
      5. Written communication


    Effective Term:
    Full Academic Year 2018/19